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MeSH Disease

HGNC Genes

SARS-CoV-2 proteins

ComplexRdRp (5)

ProteinS (5)

ORF3a (4)

ProteinN (3)

NSP2 (3)


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    Different mutations in SARS-CoV-2 associate with severe and mild outcome

    Authors: Adam Nagy; Sandor Pongor; Balazs Gyorffy

    doi:10.1101/2020.10.16.20213710 Date: 2020-10-20 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction. Genomic alterations in a viral genome can lead to either better or worse outcome and identifying these mutations is of utmost importance. Here, we correlated protein-level mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 virus to clinical outcome. Methods. Mutations in viral sequences from the GISAID virus repository were evaluated by using hCoV-19/Wuhan/WIV04/2019 as the reference. Patient outcomes were classified as mild disease, hospitalization and severe disease ( death MESHD or documented treatment in an intensive-care unit). Chi-square test was applied to examine the association between each mutation and patient outcome. False discovery rate was computed to correct for multiple hypothesis testing and results passing a FDR cutoff of 5% were accepted as significant. Results. Mutations were mapped to amino acid changes for 2,120 non-silent mutations. Mutations correlated to mild outcome were located in the ORF8 PROTEIN, NSP6 PROTEIN, ORF3a PROTEIN, NSP4 PROTEIN NSP4 HGNC, and in the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein N. Mutations associated with inferior outcome were located in the surface ( S) glycoprotein PROTEIN, in the RNA dependent RNA polymerase PROTEIN, in the 3'-to5' exonuclease, in ORF3a PROTEIN, NSP2 HGNC NSP2 PROTEIN and N. Mutations leading to severe outcome with low prevalence were found in the surface ( S) glycoprotein PROTEIN and in NSP7 PROTEIN. Five out of 17 of the most significant mutations mapped onto a 10 amino acid long phosphorylated stretch of N indicating that in spite of obvious sampling restrictions the approach can find functionally relevant sites in the viral genome. Conclusions. We demonstrate that mutations in the viral genes may have a direct correlation to clinical outcome. Our results help to quickly identify SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD harboring mutations related to severe outcome.

    Temporal landscape of mutation accumulation in SARS-CoV-2 genomes from Bangladesh: possible implications from the ongoing outbreak in Bangladesh

    Authors: Otun Saha; Rokaiya Nurani Shatadru; Nadira Naznin Rakhi; Israt Islam; Md. Shahadat Hossain; Md. Mizanur Rahaman; Leo C James; Madeline A Lancaster; Zhu Shu; Zhiming Yuan; Lei Tong; Han Xia; Jingzhe Pan; Natalie Garton; Manish Pareek; Michael Barer; Craig J Smith; Stuart M Allan; Michelle M. Lister; Hannah C. Howson-Wells; Edward C Holmes; Matthew W. Loose; Jonathan K. Ball; C. Patrick McClure; - The COVID-19 Genomics UK consortium study group; Shi Chen

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.20.259721 Date: 2020-08-21 Source: bioRxiv

    Along with intrinsic evolution, adaptation to selective pressure in new environments might have resulted in the circulatory SARS-CoV-2 strains in response to the geoenvironmental conditions of a country and the demographic profile of its population. Thus the analysis of genomic mutations of these circulatory strains may give an insight into the molecular basis of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and evolution favoring the development of effective treatment and containment strategies. With this target, the current study traced the evolutionary route and mutational frequency of 198 Bangladesh originated SARS-CoV-2 genomic sequences available in the GISAID platform over a period of 13 weeks as of 14 July 2020. The analyses were performed using MEGA 7, Swiss Model Repository, Virus Pathogen Resource and Jalview visualization. Our analysis identified that majority of the circulating strains in the country belong to B and/or L type among cluster A to Z and strikingly differ from both the reference genome and the first sequenced genome from Bangladesh. Mutations in Nonspecific protein 2 ( NSP2 PROTEIN NSP2 HGNC), NSP3 PROTEIN NSP3 HGNC, RNA dependent RNA polymerase PROTEIN ( RdRp PROTEIN), Helicase HGNC, Spike, ORF3a PROTEIN, and Nucleocapsid (N) protein PROTEIN were common in the circulating strains with varying degrees and the most unique mutations(UM) were found in NSP3 HGNC NSP3 PROTEIN (UM-18). But no or limited changes were observed in NSP9 PROTEIN, NSP11 PROTEIN, E (Envelope), NSP7a, ORF 6, and ORF 7b suggesting the possible conserved functions of those proteins in SARS-CoV-2 propagation. However, along with D614G mutation, more than 20 different mutations in the Spike protein PROTEIN were detected basically in the S2 domain. Besides, mutations in SR-rich region of N protein PROTEIN and P323L in RDRP PROTEIN were also present. However, the mutation accumulation showed an association with sex and age of the COVID-19 MESHD positive cases. So, identification of these mutational accumulation patterns may greatly facilitate drug/ vaccine development deciphering the age and the sex dependent differential susceptibility to COVID-19 MESHD.

    Comprehensive analysis of genomic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 in different geographic regions of India: An endeavour to classify Indian SARS-CoV-2 strains on the basis of co-existing mutations

    Authors: Rakesh Sarkar; Suvrotoa Mitra; Pritam Chandra; Priyanka Saha; Anindita Banerjee; Shanta Dutta; Mamta Chawla-Sarkar

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.14.203463 Date: 2020-07-15 Source: bioRxiv

    Accumulation of mutations within the genome is the primary driving force for viral evolution within an endemic setting. This inherent feature often leads to altered virulence, infectivity and transmissibility as well as antigenic shift to escape host immunity, which might compromise the efficacy of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Therefore, we aimed at genome-wide analyses of circulating SARS-CoV-2 viruses for the emergence of novel co-existing mutations and trace their spatial distribution within India. Comprehensive analysis of whole genome sequences of 441 Indian SARS-CoV-2 strains revealed the occurrence of 33 different mutations, 21 being distinctive to India. Emergence of novel mutations were observed in S glycoprotein PROTEIN (7/33), NSP3 HGNC NSP3 PROTEIN (6/33), RdRp PROTEIN/ NSP12 PROTEIN (4/33), NSP2 PROTEIN NSP2 HGNC (2/33) and N (2/33). Non-synonymous mutations were found to be 3.4 times more prevalent than synonymous mutations. We classified the Indian isolates into 22 groups based on the co-existing mutations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that representative strain of each group divided themselves into various sub-clades within their respective clades, based on the presence of unique co-existing mutations. India was dominated by A2a clade (55.60%) followed by A3 (37.38%) and B (7%), but exhibited heterogeneous distribution among various geographical regions. The A2a clade mostly predominated in East India, Western India and Central India, whereas A3 clade prevailed in South and North India. In conclusion, this study highlights the divergent evolution of SARS-CoV-2 strains and co-circulation of multiple clades in India. Monitoring of the emerging mutations would pave ways for vaccine formulation and designing of antiviral drugs.

    Genomic diversity and hotspot mutations in 30,983 SARS-CoV-2 genomes: moving toward a universal vaccine for the "confined virus"?

    Authors: Tarek Alouane; Meriem Laamarti; Abdelomunim Essabbar; Mohammed Hakmi; El Mehdi Bouricha; M.W. Chemao-Elfihri; Souad Kartti; Nasma Boumajdi; Houda Bendani; Rokia Laamarti; Fatima Ghrifi; Loubna Allam; Tarik Aanniz; Mouna Ouadghiri; Naima El Hafidi; Rachid El Jaoudi; Houda Benrahma; Jalil El Attar; Rachid Mentag; Laila Sbabou; Chakib Nejjari; Saaid Amzazi; Lahcen Belyamani; Azeddine Ibrahimi

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.20.163188 Date: 2020-06-21 Source: bioRxiv

    The COVID-19 MESHD COVID-19 MESHD pandemic has been ongoing since its onset in late November 2019 in Wuhan, China. Understanding and monitoring the genetic evolution of the virus, its geographical characteristics, and its stability are particularly important for controlling the spread of the disease and especially for the development of a universal vaccine covering all circulating strains. From this perspective, we analyzed 30,983 complete SARS-CoV-2 genomes from 79 countries located in the six continents and collected from December 24, 2019, to May 13, 2020, according to the GISAID database. Our analysis revealed the presence of 3,206 variant sites, with a uniform distribution of mutation types in different geographic areas. Remarkably, a low frequency of recurrent mutations has been observed; only 169 mutations (5.27%) had a prevalence greater than 1% of genomes. Nevertheless, fourteen non-synonymous hotspot mutations (> 10%) have been identified at different locations along the viral genome; eight in ORF1ab PROTEIN polyprotein (in nsp2 HGNC, nsp3 HGNC, transmembrane domain, RdRp PROTEIN, helicase, exonuclease, and endoribonuclease), three in nucleocapsid protein PROTEIN and one in each of three proteins: spike PROTEIN, ORF3a PROTEIN, and ORF8 PROTEIN. Moreover, 36 non-synonymous mutations were identified in the RBD of the spike protein PROTEIN with a low prevalence (<1%) across all genomes, of which only four could potentially enhance the binding of the SARS-CoV-2 spike PROTEIN protein to the human ACE2 HGNC receptor. These results along with mutational frequency dissimilarity and intra-genomic divergence of SARS-CoV-2 could indicate that the SARS-CoV-2 is not yet adapted to its host. Unlike the influenza virus or HIV viruses, the low mutation rate of SARS-CoV-2 makes the development of an effective global vaccine very likely.

    Comparative Genomic Analysis of Rapidly Evolving SARS CoV-2 Viruses Reveal Mosaic Pattern of Phylogeographical Distribution

    Authors: Roshan Kumar; Helianthous Verma; Nirjara Singhvi; Utkarsh Sood; Vipin Gupta; Mona Singh; Rashmi Sharma; Princy Hira; Shekhar Nagar; Chandni Talwar; Namita Nayyar; Shailly Anand; Charu Dogra Rawat; Mansi Verma; Ram Kishan Negi; Yogendra Singh; Rup Lal

    doi:10.1101/2020.03.25.006213 Date: 2020-03-30 Source: bioRxiv

    The Coronavirus Disease-2019 ( COVID-19 MESHD) that started in Wuhan, China in December 2019 has spread worldwide emerging as a global pandemic. The severe respiratory pneumonia MESHD caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 has so far claimed more than 60,000 lives and has impacted human lives worldwide. However, as the novel SARS-CoV-2 displays high transmission rates, their underlying genomic severity is required to be fully understood. We studied the complete genomes of 95 SARS-CoV-2 strains from different geographical regions worldwide to uncover the pattern of the spread of the virus. We show that there is no direct transmission pattern of the virus among neighboring countries suggesting that the outbreak is a result of travel of infected humans to different countries. We revealed unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nsp13-16 (ORF1b polyprotein) and S-Protein PROTEIN within 10 viral isolates from the USA. These viral proteins are involved in RNA replication, indicating highly evolved viral strains circulating in the population of USA than other countries. Furthermore, we found an amino acid addition in nsp16 (mRNA cap-1 methyltransferase) of the USA isolate (MT188341) leading to shift in amino acid frame from position 2540 onwards. Through the construction of SARS-CoV-2-human interactome, we further revealed that multiple host proteins (PHB, PPP1CA HGNC, TGF-{beta} HGNC, SOCS3 HGNC, STAT3 HGNC, JAK1/2, SMAD3 HGNC, BCL2 HGNC, CAV1 HGNC & SPECC1 HGNC) are manipulated by the viral proteins ( nsp2 HGNC, PL-PRO, N-protein PROTEIN, ORF7a PROTEIN, M-S- ORF3a PROTEIN complex, nsp7-nsp8-nsp9- RdRp complex PROTEIN) for mediating host immune evasion. Thus, the replicative machinery of SARS-CoV-2 is fast evolving to evade host challenges which need to be considered for developing effective treatment strategies.

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MeSH Disease
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SARS-CoV-2 Proteins


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