Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Clinical Course and Risk Factors for severe Disease MESHD and Death of Adult Critically MESHD Adult TRANS Critically Ill Inpatients with COVID-19 in Toulouse, France: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Authors: William Buffières; Benjamine Sarton; Charline Zadro; Fanny Vardon Bounes; Vincent Minville; Bernard Georges; Thierry Seguin; Jean Marie Conil; Stephanie Ruiz; Samia Collot; Guillaume Ducos; Marie Virtos; Diane Osinski; David Rousset; Thomas Geeraerts; Thomas Filleron; Benoit Bataille; Jacques Izopet; Jean Ruiz; Veronique Ramonda; Olivier Fourcade; Beatrice Riu; Damien Guinault; Stein Silva

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-66770/v1 Date: 2020-08-27 Source: ResearchSquare

    BackgroundTo explore risk factors for unfavorable outcome ( death MESHD or requiring invasive mechanical ventilation at 28 days from ICU admission) of critically ill COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the Toulouse regionMethodsRetrospective cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients sequentially admitted to 12 ICUs in Toulouse region (March 9, 2020, to April 8, 2020). All patients had laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and required invasive mechanical ventilation. Baseline characteristics, pathophysiological respiratory data, clinical outcomes, viral shredding, and chest CT scan were collected.ResultsA total of 150 patients were included (median age TRANS, 68 years (interquartile range, (IQR), 58-72; 81% male TRANS). The most common comorbidities were hypertension HP (77, 51%) and obesity HP (42, 28%). At ICU admission, the median PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 138 (IQR,112-178). During hospitalization, the rate of ventilator-acquired pneumonia HP (VAP) was 61% and 51 (34%) patients had acute kidney injury HP (AKI) with a Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) score > 1. The 28-day mortality was 15.3%, and 50 (33%) patients had unfavorable outcome. We found that VAP (5.91; 2.10-10.03; p value = 0.002) and AKI with a KDIGO score > 1 (4.71; 1.69-14.41; p value = 0.004) were associated with increased odds of unfavorable outcome. Neither, chest CT scan data on admission, nor pathophysiological respiratory data during ICU stay were associated to patient’s outcome.ConclusionThe potential risk factors of AKI and VAP could help clinicians to identify patients with poor prognosis at an early stage. Targeted care of these factors might have a significant impact on COVID-19 patient’s outcome.

    Number of Pre-Existing Comorbidities and Prognosis of COVID-19: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Authors: Danrong Jing; Juan Su; Lin Ye; Yan Zhang; Yanhui Cui; Hong Liu; Minxue Shen; Pinhua Pan; Xiang Chen

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-61563/v1 Date: 2020-08-18 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Though many studies have described the association of COVID-19 and different kinds of noncommunicable chronic diseases, information with the combine effects of comorbidities to COVID-19 patients have not been well characterized yet. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of numbers of comorbidities with critical type and death of COVID-19.Methods: This was a single-centered retrospective study among patients with COVID-19. All patients with COVID-19 enrolled in this study were diagnosed according to World Health Organization interim guidance. Six different kinds of noncommunicable chronic diseases were included in this study. The logistic regression model was used to estimate the fixed effect of numbers of comorbidities on critical type or death MESHD, adjusting for potential confounders.Results: In total, 475 COVID-19 patients were enrolled in our study, included 234 females TRANS and 241 males TRANS. Hypertension HP Hypertension MESHD was the most frequent type (162 [34.1%] of 475 patients). Patients with two or more comorbidities have higher risk of critical type (OR 3.072, 95% CI [1.581, 5.970], p=0.001) and death MESHD (OR 5.538, 95% CI [1.577, 19.451], p=0.008) compared to patients without comorbidities. And the results were similar after adjusting for age TRANS and gender TRANS in critical type (OR 2.021, 95% CI [1.002–4.077], p=0.049) and death MESHD (OR 3.653, 95% CI [0.989, 13.494], p=0.052).Conclusions: The number of comorbidities was an independent risk factor for critical type and death in COVID-19 patients.

    Trends in Covid-19 risk-adjusted mortality rates in a single health system

    Authors: Leora Horwitz; Simon A. Jones; Robert J. Cerfolio; Fritz Francois; Joseph Greco; Bret Rudy; Christopher M Petrilli; Ishan Paranjpe; Jessica K De Freitas; Tingyi Wanyan; Kipp W Johnson; Mesude Bicak; Eyal Klang; Young Joon Kwon; Anthony Costa; Shan Zhao; Riccardo Miotto; Alexander W Charney; Erwin Böttinger; Zahi A Fayad; Girish N Nadkarni; Fei Wang; Benjamin S Glicksberg; Laura J. Scott; Karen L. Mohlke; Kerrin S. Small

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.11.20172775 Date: 2020-08-14 Source: medRxiv

    Early reports showed high mortality from Covid-19; by contrast, the current outbreaks in the southern and western United States are associated with fewer deaths, raising hope that treatments have improved. However, in Texas for instance, 63% of diagnosed cases are currently under 50, compared to only 52% nationally in March-April. Current demographics in Arizona and Florida are similar. Therefore, whether decreasing Covid-19 mortality rates are a reflection of changing demographics or represent improvements in clinical care is unknown. We assessed outcomes over time in a single health system, accounting for changes in demographics and clinical factors. Methods We analyzed biweekly mortality rates for admissions between March 1 and June 20, 2020 in a single health system in New York City. Outcomes were obtained as of July 14, 2020. We included all hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19 disease. Patients with multiple hospitalizations (N=157, 3.3%) were included repeatedly if they continued to have laboratory-confirmed disease. Mortality was defined as in-hospital death MESHD or discharge to hospice care. Based on prior literature, we constructed a multivariable logistic regression model to generate expected risk of death MESHD, adjusting for age TRANS; sex; self-reported race and ethnicity; body mass index; smoking history; presence of hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, heart failure MESHD, hyperlipidemia HP hyperlipidemia MESHD, coronary artery disease MESHD, diabetes MESHD, cancer MESHD, chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD, or pulmonary disease MESHD individually as dummy variables; and admission oxygen saturation, D-dimer, C reactive protein, ferritin, and cycle threshold for RNA detection. All data were obtained from the electronic health record. We then calculated the sum of observed and expected deaths in each two-week period and multiplied each period's observed/expected (O/E) risk by the overall average crude mortality to generate biweekly adjusted rates. We calculated Poisson control limits and indicated points outside the control limits as significantly different, following statistical process control standards. The NYU institutional review board approved the study and granted a waiver of consent. Results We included 4,689 hospitalizations, of which 4,661 (99.4%) had died or been discharged. The median age TRANS, and the proportion male TRANS or with any comorbidity decreased over time; median real-time PCR cycle threshold increased (indicating relatively less concentration of virus) (Table). For instance, median age TRANS decreased from 67 years in the first two weeks to 49 in the last two. Peak hospitalizations were during the fifth and sixth study weeks, which accounted for 40% of the hospitalizations. Median length of stay for patients who died or were discharged to hospice was 8 days (interquartile range, 4-16). Unadjusted mortality dropped each period, from 30.2% in the first two weeks to 3% in the last two weeks, with the last eight weeks being lower than the 95% control limits. Risk adjustment partially attenuated the mortality decline, but adjusted mortality rates in the second-to-last two weeks remained outside the control limits (Figure, Table). The O/E risk of mortality decreased from 1.07 (0.64-1.67) in the first two weeks to 0.39 (0.08-1.12) in the last two weeks. Discussion In this 16-week study of Covid-19 mortality at a single health system, we found that changes in demographics and severity of illness at presentation account for some, but not all, of the decrease in unadjusted mortality. Even after risk adjustment for a variety of clinical and demographic factors, mortality was significantly lower towards the end of the study period. Incremental improvements in outcomes are likely a combination of increasing clinical experience, decreasing hospital volume, growing use of new pharmacologic treatments (such as corticosteroids, remdesivir and anti-cytokine treatments), non-pharmacologic treatments (such as proning), earlier intervention, community awareness, and lower viral load exposure from increasing mask wearing and social distancing. It is also possible that earlier periods had a more virulent circulating strain. In summary, data from one health system suggest that Covid-19 remains a serious disease for high risk patients, but that outcomes may be improving.

    Observational Study on Clinical Features, Treatment and Outcome of COVID 19 in a tertiary care Centre in India- a retrospective case series

    Authors: Raja Bhattacharya; Rohini Ghosh; Manish Kulshrestha; Sampurna Chowdhury; Rishav Mukherjee; Indranil Ray; Lionel Tim Ee Cheng; Lynette Lin Ean Oon; Min Han Tan; Kian Sing Chan; Li Yang Hsu; Ramgyan Yadav; Ashish Timalsina; Chetan Nidhi Wagle; Brij Kumar Das; Ramesh Kunwar; Binaya Chalise; Deepak Raj Bhatta; Mukesh Adhikari; Michael Gale; Daniel J Campbell; David Rawlings; Marion Pepper

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.12.20170282 Date: 2020-08-14 Source: medRxiv

    ABSTRACT Objective: This study will attempt to explore the demographic profile and outcome in the patients receiving multidisciplinary, personalised approach including use of Broad Spectrum Antivirals - Ivermectin, anti-inflammatory and antioxidants roles of Statins and N-acetyl-cysteine along with Standard of Care (SOC) in hospitalised COVID19 patients in a tertiary care centre. Setting: Inpatient department Participants: 191 COVID-19 patients with laboratory confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections MESHD in the year 2020 between June 14- 28, 2020 Main outcome measures: The outcome of Interests are : Studying the demographic profile of COVID 19 cases Study the treatment outcomes in terms of death MESHD or discharge in patients receiving Ivermectin+N-acetyl-cysteine+Statin along with Standard of care. Results: 148 patients were included in the study. All of them had confirmed COVID19 infection MESHD by the rtPCR method. Average age TRANS of the patients was 57.57 years ( Range = 17 - 88), 49% were male TRANS, 51% female TRANS. 81% of the patients had at least one or more comorbidities. Most common comorbidities included diabetes MESHD( 32%), Hypertension HP Hypertension MESHD (27%), Ischaemic Heart Disease MESHD (8%). More comorbidities. The in hospital, Case Fatality Rate was therefore, 1.35 %. The remaining 144 were discharged from the facility after an average 12 days duration of stay. Conclusions: Triple therapy with ivermectin + atorvastatin + N-acetylcysteine can be an useful adjunct to standard of care. Keywords: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, outpatients, treatment, zinc, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin

    Diabetic MESHD Patients with Comorbidities had Worse Outcomes When Suffered with COVID-19 and Acarbose might have Protective Effects

    Authors: Weihua Hu, MD; Shunkui Luo; Zhanjin Lu, MD; Chang Li; Qijian Chen; Yameng Fan; Zaishu Chen; Longlong Wu; Jianfang Ye; Shiyan Chen; Junlu Tong; Lingling Wang; Jin Mei; Hongyun Lu

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-57456/v1 Date: 2020-08-11 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Previous studies showed that diabetes MESHD was a common comorbidity of COVID-19, but the effects of diabetes MESHD or anti- diabetic MESHD drugs on the mortality of COVID-19 have not been well described. To investigate the outcome of different status (with or without comorbidity) and anti- diabetic MESHD medication before admission of diabetic MESHD patients after SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD, we collected clinical data of COVID-19 patients from Hubei Province and compared between diabetes MESHD and non-diabetes MESHD.Methods: In this multicenter and retrospective study, we enrolled 1,422 cases of consecutive hospitalized patients from January 21, 2020 to March 25, 2020 at six hospitals in Hubei Province, China. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality.Results: Diabetes MESHD patients were 10-years older than non-diabetes MESHD (p<0.001), had higher prevalence SERO of comorbidities such as hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (p<0.001), coronary heart disease MESHD (p<0.001), cerebrovascular disease MESHD ( CVD MESHD) (p<0.001), chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD ( CKD MESHD) (p=0.007). The incidence of mortality (p=0.003) were more prevalent among the diabetes MESHD group. Further analysis revealed that diabetes MESHD patients who took alpha-glucosidase inhibitor ( AGI MESHD) had lower mortality rate(p<0.01). Multivariable Cox regression showed that male TRANS sex, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, CKD MESHD, CVD MESHD, age TRANS were risk factors for the mortality of COVID-19. Survival curve revealed that, compared with diabetes MESHD only group, the mortality was increased in diabetes MESHD with comorbidities (p=0.009), but had no significant difference in the non-comorbidity group, p=0.59).Conclusions: Patients with diabetes MESHD had worse outcome when suffered with COVID-19, however, it was not associated with diabetes MESHD itself but the comorbidities. Furthermore, the administration of AGI could reduce the risk of death MESHD in patients with diabetes MESHD.

    Clinical Determinants of the Severity of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Authors: Yanling Wu; Hu Li; Shengjin Li

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-56852/v1 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging pathogen, and coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) has been declared a global pandemic. We aim to summarize current evidence regarding the risk of death MESHD and the severity of COVID-19 as well as risk factors for severe COVID-19.Methods: The PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases as well as some Chinese databases were searched for clinical and epidemiological studies on COVID-19. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine COVID-19-related death MESHD and risk factors for the severity of COVID-19.Results: A total of 55 studies fulfilled the criteria for this review. The case fatality risk ranged from 0 to 61.5%, with a pooled estimate of 3.3%. The risks of ICU admission, acute respiratory distress syndrome MESHD respiratory distress HP syndrome ( ARDS MESHD)and severe COVID-19 were 24.9%, 20.9% and 26.6%, respectively. Factors related to the risk of severe COVID-19 were older age TRANS (MD=10.09, 95% CI:7.03, 13.16), male TRANS sex (OR=1.62, 95% CI:1.32, 1.99), hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (OR=2.34, 95% CI:1.47, 3.73), diabetes MESHD (OR=2.25, 95% CI:1.68, 3.03), chronic renal disease MESHD (OR=3.60, 95% CI:1.53, 8.46), heart disease MESHD (OR=2.76, 95% CI:1.78, 4.30), respiratory disease MESHD (OR=3.74, 95% CI:2.15, 6.49), cerebrovascular disease MESHD (OR=2.21, 95% CI:1.23, 3.98), higher D-dimer levels (SMD=0.62, 95% CI:0.28, 0.96), and higher IL-6 levels (SMD=2.21, 95% CI:0.11, 4.31). However, liver disease MESHD (OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.36, 1.10) was found to be a nonsignificant predictor of the severity of COVID-19.Conclusions: The case fatality risk of COVID-19 and the risk of severe manifestations were not very high, and variances in the study designs and regions led to high heterogeneity among the studies. Male TRANS sex, older age TRANS, comorbidities such as hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, diabetes MESHD, cardiovascular disease MESHD, respiratory disease MESHD and cerebrovascular disease MESHD could increase the risk of developing a severe case of COVID-19. Laboratory parameters, such as D-dimer and IL-6 levels, could affect the prognosis of COVID-19.

    Sex-specificity of mortality risk factors among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in New York City: prospective cohort study

    Authors: Tomi Jun; Sharon Nirenberg; Patricia Kovatch; Kuan-lin Huang

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164640 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: To identify sex-specific effects of risk factors for in-hospital mortality among COVID-19 patients admitted to a hospital system in New York City. Design: Prospective observational cohort study with in-hospital mortality as the primary outcome. Setting: Five acute care hospitals within a single academic medical system in New York City. Participants: 3,086 hospital inpatients with COVID-19 admitted on or before April 13, 2020 and followed through June 2, 2020. Follow-up till discharge or death MESHD was complete for 99.3% of the cohort. Results: The majority of the cohort was male TRANS (59.6%). Men were younger (median 64 vs. 70, p<0.001) and less likely to have comorbidities such as hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (32.5% vs. 39.9%, p<0.001), diabetes MESHD (22.6% vs. 26%, p=0.03), and obesity HP obesity MESHD (6.9% vs. 9.8%, p=0.004) compared to women. Women had lower median values of laboratory markers associated with inflammation MESHD compared to men: white blood SERO cells (5.95 vs. 6.8 K/uL, p<0.001), procalcitonin (0.14 vs 0.21 ng/mL, p<0.001), lactate dehydrogenase (375 vs. 428 U/L, p<0.001), C-reactive protein (87.7 vs. 123.2 mg/L, p<0.001). Unadjusted mortality was similar between men and women (28.8% vs. 28.5%, p=0.84), but more men required intensive care than women (25.2% vs. 19%, p<0.001). Male TRANS sex was an independent risk factor for mortality (OR 1.26, 95% 1.04-1.51) after adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and baseline hypoxia MESHD. There were significant interactions between sex and coronary artery disease MESHD (p=0.038), obesity HP obesity MESHD (p=0.01), baseline hypoxia MESHD (p<0.001), ferritin (p=0.002), lactate dehydrogenase (p=0.003), and procalcitonin (p=0.03). Except for procalcitonin, which had the opposite association, each of these factors was associated with disproportionately higher mortality among women. Conclusions: Male TRANS sex was an independent predictor of mortality, consistent with prior studies. Notably, there were significant sex-specific interactions which indicated a disproportionate increase in mortality among women with coronary artery disease MESHD, obesity HP obesity MESHD, and hypoxia MESHD. These new findings highlight patient subgroups for further study and help explain the recognized sex differences in COVID-19 outcomes.

    Patient characteristics and predictors of mortality in 470 adults TRANS admitted to a district general hospital in England with Covid-19

    Authors: Joseph V Thompson; Nevan Meghani; Bethan M Powell; Ian Newell; Roanna Craven; Gemma Skilton; Lydia J Bagg; Irha Yaqoob; Michael J Dixon; Eleanor J Evans; Belina Kambele; Asif Rehman; Georges Ng Man Kwong

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.21.20153650 Date: 2020-07-27 Source: medRxiv

    Background Understanding risk factors for death MESHD in Covid 19 is key to providing good quality clinical care. Due to a paucity of robust evidence, we sought to assess the presenting characteristics of patients with Covid 19 and investigate factors associated with death MESHD. Methods Retrospective analysis of adults TRANS admitted with Covid 19 to Royal Oldham Hospital, UK. Logistic regression modelling was utilised to explore factors predicting death. Results 470 patients were admitted, of whom 169 (36%) died. The median age TRANS was 71 years (IQR 57 to 82), and 255 (54.3%) were men. The most common comorbidities were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (n=218, 46.4%), diabetes MESHD (n=143, 30.4%) and chronic neurological disease MESHD (n=123, 26.1%). The most frequent complications were acute kidney injury HP acute kidney injury MESHD (n=157, 33.4%) and myocardial injury MESHD (n=21, 4.5%). Forty three (9.1%) patients required intubation and ventilation, and 39 (8.3%) received non-invasive ventilation Independent risk factors for death MESHD were increasing age TRANS (OR per 10 year increase above 40 years 1.87, 95% CI 1.57 to 2.27), hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (OR 1.72, 1.10 to 2.70), cancer MESHD (OR 2.20, 1.27 to 3.81), platelets <150x103/microlitre (OR 1.93, 1.13 to 3.30), C-reactive protein >100 micrograms/mL (OR 1.68, 1.05 to 2.68), >50% chest radiograph infiltrates, (OR 2.09, 1.16 to 3.77) and acute kidney injury HP acute kidney injury MESHD (OR 2.60, 1.64 to 4.13). There was no independent association between death MESHD and gender TRANS, ethnicity, deprivation level, fever HP fever MESHD, SpO2/FiO2 (oxygen saturation index), lymphopenia HP lymphopenia MESHD or other comorbidities. Conclusions We characterised the first wave of patients with Covid 19 in one of Englands highest incidence areas, determining which factors predict death. These findings will inform clinical and shared decision making, including the use of respiratory support and therapeutic agents.

    The impact of previous history of bariatric surgery on outcome of Covid-19: A nationwide medico-administrative French study.

    Authors: Antonio Iannelli; Samir Bouam; Anne-Sophie Schneck; Sébastien Frey; Jean Gugenheim; Marco Alifano

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-48313/v1 Date: 2020-07-24 Source: ResearchSquare

    Purpose: To determine the risk of invasive mechanical ventilation and death MESHD in obese MESHD individuals with history of bariatric surgery compared to standard ones admitted for Covid-19 infection MESHD.Methods: Nationwide retrospective observational study based on electronic health data. 4 248 253 individuals aged TRANS 15 to 75 years with a diagnosis of obesity HP obesity MESHD were included. All obese MESHD inpatients, undergoing bariatric surgery or not, recorded during a hospital stay by the French National Health Insurance were followed, during a mean observation time of 5.43 ± 2.93 years. This exposition was bariatric surgery (n=389,671) including adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass versus no bariatric surgery (n=3,858,582). The primary outcome was Covid-19 related death MESHD and the secondary outcome was the need for invasive mechanical ventilation.Results: 8 286 (0.2%) obese MESHD individuals were admitted for Covid-19 infection between January 1st and May 15th 2020 with a diagnosis of Covid-19 infection MESHD. 541 (0.14%) had a history of bariatric surgery and 7,745 (0.2%) did not. Invasive mechanical ventilation was necessary in 14.54% of patients and death MESHD occurred in 13.58% of cases. The need for an invasive mechanical ventilation and death MESHD occurred in 7% and 3.5% in the bariatric surgery group versus 15% and 14.2% in the non-bariatric surgery group, respectively (both p<0.0001). After a logistic regression, the risk of invasive mechanical ventilation significantly increased with age TRANS being higher in the age TRANS class 61-75, male TRANS gender TRANS, and hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, whereas bariatric surgery showed an independent protective effect. Mortality was independently associated with increasing age TRANS, male TRANS gender TRANS, known history of heart failure MESHD, cancer MESHD, and diabetes MESHD, whereas BS was in favor with a protective effect. Conclusion: This nationwide administrative study showed that bariatric surgery is independently associated with a reduced risk of death MESHD and invasive mechanical ventilation in obese MESHD individuals with Covid-19 infection MESHD.

    Clinical Characteristics and Predictive Value of low CD4+T Count in Patients with Moderate and Severe COVID-19: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    Authors: Xue-song Wen; Lei Gao; Dan Jiang; Xiao-cheng Cheng; Bin He; Yue Chen; Peng Lei; Wei-xiao Tan; Shu Qin; Guo-qiang Cai; dongying zhang

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-46009/v1 Date: 2020-07-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background In December 2019, coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, Hubei, China. And, it has become a global pandemic. Describe the patient's clinical symptoms in detail, finding markers that predict the prognosis of patients with COVID-19 are of great value.MethodsIn this multicenter, retrospective study, 476 patients with COVID-19 were recruited from a consecutive series. After screening, a total of 395 patients were included in this study. All-cause death MESHD was the primary endpoint. All patients were followed up from admission till discharge or death MESHD.ResultsThe dominant symptoms observed in the study included fever HP fever MESHD on admission, cough HP, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD and shortness of breath MESHD. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD and diabetes MESHD. Compared with patients with higher CD4+T cells level, patients with lower CD4+T cells level were older and were more frequently male TRANS. In terms of laboratory findings, lymphocyte count, CD4+T cell count, CD8+T cell count were significantly lower in low group than in higher group. The case in-hospital death rate was significant higher in patients with lower CD4+T level. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, CD4+T count below the lower limit of normal showed independent prognostic value for all-cause in-hospital death MESHD in patients with COVID-19. Conclusions: Reductions in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets are common in COVID-19 patients, especially in severe cases. It is the CD8+T count, not the CD4+T count, that reflected the severity of the patient’s disease. Lower CD4+T count is independently associated with an increased rate of in-hospital death. Trial registration: Prognostic Factors of Patients With COVID-19, NCT04292964. Registered 03 March 2020. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04292964.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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