Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 46
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    Development, clinical translation, and utility of a COVID-19 antibody test SERO with qualitative and quantitative readouts

    Authors: Robert H. Bortz III; Catalina Florez; Ethan Laudermilch; Ariel S Wirchnianski; Gorka Lasso; Ryan J Malonis; George I Georgiev; Olivia Vergnolle; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20192187 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) continues to place an immense burden on societies and healthcare systems. A key component of COVID-19 control efforts is serologic testing SERO to determine the community prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 exposure and quantify individual immune responses to prior infection MESHD or vaccination. Here, we describe a laboratory-developed antibody test SERO that uses readily available research-grade reagents to detect SARS-CoV-2 exposure in patient blood SERO samples with high sensitivity SERO and specificity. We further show that this test affords the estimation of viral spike-specific IgG titers from a single sample measurement, thereby providing a simple and scalable method to measure the strength of an individual's immune response. The accuracy, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of this test makes it an excellent option for clinical deployment in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    Antibody SERO Responses to SARS-CoV-2 in Coronavirus Diseases MESHD 2019 Patients with Different Severity

    Authors: Ekasit Kowitdamrong; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Watsamon Jantarabenjakul; Eakachai Prompetchara; Pintip Suchartlikitwong; Opass Putcharoen; Nattiya Hirankarn; Ke Lan; Yu Chen; Huabin Zhao

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.06.20189480 Date: 2020-09-08 Source: medRxiv

    Background: More understanding of antibody SERO responses in the SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD population is useful for vaccine development. Aim: To investigate SARS-CoV-2 IgA MESHD and IgG among COVID-19 Thai patients with different severity. Methods: We used plasma SERO from 118 adult TRANS patients who have confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 49 patients under investigation without infection MESHD, 20 patients with other respiratory infections MESHD, and 102 healthy controls. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO from Euroimmun. The optical density ratio cut off for positive test was 1.1 for IgA and 0.8 for IgG. The association of antibody SERO response with the severity of diseases and the day of symptoms was performed. Results: From Mar 10 to May 31, 2020, 289 participants were enrolled, and 384 samples were analyzed. Patients were categorized by clinical manifestations to mild (n=59), moderate (n=27) and severe (n=32). The overall sensitivity SERO of IgA and IgG from samples collected after day 7 is 87.9% (95% CI 79.8-93.6) and 84.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.3), respectively. The severe group had a significantly higher level of specific IgA and IgG to S1 antigen compared to the mild group. All moderate to severe patients have specific IgG while 20% of the mild group did not have any IgG detected after two weeks. Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 IgG level was significantly higher in males TRANS compared to females TRANS among the severe group (p=0.003). Conclusion: The serologic test SERO for SARS-CoV-2 has high sensitivity SERO after the second week after onset of illness. Serological response differs among patients with different severity and different sex.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J Abu-Raddad; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184705 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Methods: An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions. Results: The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak. Conclusions: Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    74 Days Dynamic Changes of Chest CT Images of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) in Hebei Province, China

    Authors: jianqin Liang; Guizeng Liu; Shuzhuang Yu; Yang Yang; Yanchun Li; Hongli Tian; Zhe Chen

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-70721/v1 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Since December 2019, the COVID-19 infection broke MESHD out in many parts of the world with confirmed and death MESHD cases rapidly increasing, which posed a great threat to human life and health. Current nucleic acid detection and antibody testing SERO for the SARS-CoV-2 were the main methods for diagnosis of COVID-19, but not so sensitive, with high false negative rate and missed diagnosis rate. Imaging changes of COVID-19 not only precede symptomatic changes, but also have different imaging characteristics in different periods. We conducted 74 days of dynamic chest CT imaging observation on COVID-19 patients in Hebei province, aiming to understand the dynamic characteristics of the chest CT changes of COVID-19, so as to find the source of infection early, take early intervention measures, and judge the prognosis. Methods Chest CT examinations at intervals 1 to 4 days were conducted for 11 patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19. On the 74th day after onset, chest CT was reexamined to analyze the characteristics of chest CT in each stage. Results Of the 11 cases, 1 case was imported from Wuhan, 10 cases were infected for family clustering after close contact TRANS with confirmed COVID-19 cases. There were 3 ordinary cases, 3 severe cases and 5 critical cases. Among them, 2 critical cases died for old age TRANS and complications of underlying diseases MESHD, while 9 cases were cured by April 7, 2020. The changes of chest CT imaging in 1 child TRANS appeared prior to the clinical symptoms. 1–4 days after onset of the initial symptom were the early stages: Chest CT was mainly characterized by single lung quasi-circular ground glass shadow and fine mesh shadow. 5–10 days were the progressive stages: The lesion spread along the axial interstitium of the bronchi and gradually diffused to the whole lung, and reach the peak on day 6 to 9, which was characterized by consolidation, paving stone sign, halo sign, reversed halo sign, and even ‘white lung’ for the critical patients. The recovery stages began on day 11 after onset: The fiber cord, ground glass and consolidation shadow were gradually absorbed. After 74 days of follow-up, no serious permanent lung injury MESHD was found. Conclusion Chest CT could determine the different stages of COVID-19. Dynamic follow-up chest CT showed a good prognosis of COVID-19 in Hebei Province, China

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J. Abu-Raddad

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-70006/v1 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics.Methods An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions.Results The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak.Conclusions Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Bronchoscopy on Intubated COVID-19 Patients is Associated with Low Infectious Risk to Operators at a High-Volume Center Using an Aerosol-minimizing Protocol

    Authors: Catherine A. Gao; Joseph Isaac Bailey; James M. Walter; John M. Coleman III; Elizabeth S. Malsin; A. Christine Argento; Michelle H. Prickett; - NU COVID Investigators; Richard G. Wunderink; Sean B. Smith; Samira Mubareka; Allison McGeer; Adrienne K Chan; Anne-Claude Gingras; Tania H Watts; Mario Ostrowski; Elisabet Leiva; Albert Ariza-Sole; Paolo D Dallaglio; Maria Quero; Antonio Soriano; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20177543 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic raised concern for exposure to healthcare providers through aerosol generating procedures, such as bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Current society guidelines recommended limiting use of BAL to reduce operators' risk for infection TRANS risk for infection TRANS infection MESHD, yet data on the infection rate for providers after BAL is sparse. Since March 2020, our institution used a modified protocol to perform over 450 BALs on intubated COVID-19 patients. We therefore sought to describe the subsequent infectious risks to providers associated with BAL. Methods: Fifty-two pulmonary and critical care providers (faculty and fellows) at our tertiary-care, urban medical center were surveyed. Survey participants were asked to provide the number of BALs on COVID-19 patients they performed, the number of weeks they cared for intensive care unit (ICU) patients with COVID-19, and the results of any SARS-CoV-2 testing that they received. Participants were asked to assess the difficulty of BAL on intubated COVID-19 patients as compared to routine ICU BAL using a numeric perceived difficulty score ranging from 1 (easier) to 10 (harder). Results: We received forty-seven responses from fifty-two surveyed (90% response rate), with 2 declining to participate. Many respondents (19/45, 42%) spent >5 weeks on an ICU service with COVID-19 patients. The number of BALs performed by providers ranged from 0 to >60. Sixteen of the 35 providers (46%) who performed BALs underwent at least one nasopharyngeal (NP) swab to test for SARS-CoV-2, but none were positive. Twenty-seven of the 35 providers (77%) who performed BALs underwent SARS-CoV-2 serology testing, and only one (3.7%) was positive. Respondents indicated occasionally not being able to follow aerosol-minimizing steps but overall felt BALs in COVID-19 patients was only slightly more difficult than routine ICU BAL. Discussion: At a high-volume center having performed >450 BALs on intubated COVID-19 patients with aerosol-limiting precautions, our survey of bronchoscopists found no positive NP SARS-CoV-2 tests and only one positive antibody test SERO result. While the optimal role for COVID-19 BAL remains to be determined, these data suggest that BAL can be safely performed in intubated COVID-19 patients if experienced providers take precautions to limit aerosol generation and wear personal protective equipment.

    Multi-species ELISA SERO for the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in animals

    Authors: Kerstin Wernike; Andrea Aebischer; Anna Michelitsch; Donata Hoffmann; Conrad Freuling; Anne Balkema-Buschmann; Annika Graaf; Thomas Mueller; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Melanie Rissmann; Dennis Rubbenstroth; Jacob Schoen; Claudia Schulz; Jakob Trimpert; Lorenz Ulrich; Asisa Volz; Thomas Mettenleiter; Martin Beer; Thamar Loser; Susanne Mangold; Christel Herzog; Dieter Schiegg; Christian Reichen; Filip Radom; Andreas Bosshart; Andreas Lehmann; Micha A. Haeuptle; Alexander Zuercher; Toni Vagt; Gabriel Sigrist; Marcel Straumann; Karl Proba; Niina Veitonmaki; Keith M. Dawson; Christof Zitt; Jennifer Mayor; Sarah Ryter; Heyrhyoung Lyoo; Chunyan Wang; Wentao Li; Ieva Drulyte; H. Kaspar Binz; Leon de Waal; Koert J. Stittelaar; Seth Lewis; Daniel Steiner; Frank J.M. van Kuppeveld; Olivier Engler; Berend-Jan Bosch; Michael T. Stumpp; Patrick Amstutz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.26.266825 Date: 2020-08-26 Source: bioRxiv

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic with millions of infected humans and hundreds of thousands of fatalities. As the novel disease - referred to as COVID-19 - unfolded, occasional anthropozoonotic infections of animals by owners or caretakers were reported in dogs, felid species and farmed mink. Further species were shown to be susceptible under experimental conditions. The extent of natural infections of animals, however, is still largely unknown. Serological methods will be useful tools for tracing TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in animals once test systems are validated for use in different species. Here, we developed an indirect multi-species ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. The newly established ELISA SERO was validated using 59 sera of infected MESHD or vaccinated animals including ferrets, raccoon dogs, hamsters, rabbits, chickens, cattle and a cat, and a total of 220 antibody SERO-negative sera of the same animal species. Overall, a diagnostic specificity of 100.0% and sensitivity SERO of 98.31% was achieved, and the functionality with every species included in this study could be demonstrated. Hence, a versatile and reliable ELISA SERO protocol was established that enables high-throughput antibody SERO detection in a broad range of animal species, which may be used for outbreak investigations, to assess the seroprevalence SERO in susceptible species or to screen for reservoir or intermediate hosts.

    Genetic testing and serological SERO screening for SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in a COVID-19 outbreak in a nursing facility in Japan

    Authors: Yong Chong; Naoki Tani; Hideyuki Ikematsu; Nobuto Terazawa; Hitoshi Nakashima; Nobuyuki Shimono; Koichi Akashi; Yosuke Tanaka

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-64266/v1 Date: 2020-08-23 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: The Pandemic of coronavirus disease MESHD (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2), has critically impacted the spread of infection within nursing facilities. We evaluated the usefulness of genetic and serological tests SERO conducted during a COVID-19 outbreak in a nursing facility in Japan.Methods: After the first identification of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, a comprehensive, facility- and/or unit-wide PCR testing from nasopharyngeal swabs was repeatedly performed in a three-unit facility including 99 residents with dementia HP dementia MESHD and 53 healthcare personnel. Additionally, PCR testing was conducted separately for residents and staff with fever HP fever MESHD of ≥37.5 oC. Facility-wide serological testing SERO, including rapid kit testing and quantitative assay, was conducted twice over 1 month apart.Results: A total of 322 PCR and 257 antibody tests SERO were performed. 37 (24.3%) of the 152 individuals (25/99 residents, 25.3%; 12/53 staff, 22.6%) were identified as PCR-positive. Seven residents died with a mortality of 7.1% (7/99). Among the 37 individuals, 10 (27.0%) were asymptomatic TRANS at the time of testing. PCR positivity was concentrated on one unit (Unit 1) (20/30 residents, 66.7%; 9/14 staff, 64.3%). The other units showed a limited spread of infection MESHD. In unit-wide and separate tests, PCR positivity detection was highly prevalent (22.9% and 44.4%, respectively) in Unit 1, compared with that in the other units. Serological testing SERO identified two additional infected residents with a negative PCR result and showed that no staff was newly identified as infected.Conclusions: Thorough PCR testing, in combination with comprehensive and separate tests, is critical for managing COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing facilities, particularly, in units considered an epicenter. Serological testing SERO is also beneficial for tracing contacts TRANS, confirming the number of infected individuals, and authorizing the termination of the outbreak.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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