Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (10)

Pneumonia (6)

Cough (5)

Dyspnea (4)

Anxiety (4)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 71
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    Development, clinical translation, and utility of a COVID-19 antibody test SERO with qualitative and quantitative readouts

    Authors: Robert H. Bortz III; Catalina Florez; Ethan Laudermilch; Ariel S Wirchnianski; Gorka Lasso; Ryan J Malonis; George I Georgiev; Olivia Vergnolle; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20192187 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) continues to place an immense burden on societies and healthcare systems. A key component of COVID-19 control efforts is serologic testing SERO to determine the community prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 exposure and quantify individual immune responses to prior infection MESHD or vaccination. Here, we describe a laboratory-developed antibody test SERO that uses readily available research-grade reagents to detect SARS-CoV-2 exposure in patient blood SERO samples with high sensitivity SERO and specificity. We further show that this test affords the estimation of viral spike-specific IgG titers from a single sample measurement, thereby providing a simple and scalable method to measure the strength of an individual's immune response. The accuracy, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of this test makes it an excellent option for clinical deployment in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    On Cancer, COVID-19 and CT Scan: A Monocentric Retrospective Study

    Authors: Francesca Martini; Andrea D'Alessio; Federico Bracchi; Daniela Di Mauro; Anna Fargnoli; Marco Motta; Cristina Giussani; Marco Meazza Prina; Giovanni Gobbin; Monica Taverna

    id:10.20944/preprints202009.0075.v1 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: Preprints.org

    Background The acknowledgment of computed tomography (CT) defined diagnosis in high prevalence SERO northern Italy may identify more patients with Coronavirus Disease MESHD-2019 (COVID 19) infection MESHD, than RT-PCR alone. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 chest CT scans of oncological patients who were referred to the Radiological Unit of Policlinico S. Marco from 1st of February 2020 to 30th of April 2020, during the Covid-19 outbreak in Bergamo area. Therefore, we analyzed RT-PCR tests of these 148 patients. Results Among 32 patients with diagnosis of COVID-19 infection MESHD: 17 patients were asymptomatic TRANS or had mild symptoms (53.1%), while 15 developed severe disease (46.8%). The incidence of COVID-19 infection MESHD is 22.9%, the mortality rate is 18.8%. Severe COVID-19 disease is associated with higher median age TRANS. We did not find any correlation between disease severity and sex, smoke or cardiovascular comorbidities. Remarkably, patients who were on treatment developed milder disease MESHD than cancer MESHD patients who were not on treatment. Conclusions The acceptance of CT-defined diagnosis in high prevalence SERO area like Bergamo highlighted a larger number of COVID-19 oncological population than RT-PCR alone, in particular asymptomatic TRANS and mild symptomatic patients. We observed that actively treated patients had milder disease, according to previous studies that suggested a protective role of immunosuppression.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J Abu-Raddad; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184705 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Methods: An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions. Results: The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak. Conclusions: Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 Infections MESHD in a Pediatric Orthopedic Hospital

    Authors: Ghalib Bardai; Jean A Ouellet; Thomas Engelhardt; Gianluca Bertolizio; Zenghui Wu; Frank Rauch; Reinaldo E Fernandez; Owen R Baker; Morgan Keruly; Charles S Kirby; Ethan Klock; Kirsten Littlefield; Jernelle Miller; Haley A Schmidt; Philip Sullivan; Estelle Piwowar-Manning; Ruchee Shrestha; Andrew D Redd; Richard Eric Rothman; David J Sullivan; Shmuel Shoham; Arturo Casadevall; Thomas C. Quinn; Andrew Pekosz; Aaron AR Tobian; Oliver Laeyendecker; William Damsky; David van Dijk; Alfred Ian Lee; Hyung Chun; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20183533 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    This project assessed the prevalence SERO of active and past infection with severe HP infection with severe MESHD acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) in a specialized pediatric institution that did not provide care for coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (Covid-19). The study was performed in Montreal, the city with the highest number of Covid-19 cases in Canada during the early phase of the pandemic. Testing for SARS-CoV-2 RNA in 199 individuals (39 children TRANS, 61 accompanying persons, 99 hospital employees) did not reveal active infection in any of the study participants. However, 22 (11%) of study participants had SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, indicating prior infection MESHD. Ten of these participants did not report symptoms compatible with Covid-19 in the 6 months prior to the study. Thus, although no evidence for active infection MESHD was found within the institution, consideration should be given to regular staff testing to detect asymptomatic TRANS spreading of SARS-CoV-2. In addition, it could be useful to test accompanying persons in children TRANS presenting for surgical procedures.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    Asymptomatic TRANS cases and limited transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in residents and healthcare workers in three Dutch nursing homes

    Authors: Laura W van Buul; Judith Henriette van den Besselaar; Fleur M.H.P.H. Koene; Bianca M. Buurman; Cees M.P.M. Hertogh; Kamalini Lokuge; Ali H Mokdad; Peter J. Hotez; Robin B. Gasser; Parveen Bahel; Kent Owusu; Yu Yamamoto; Tanima Arora; Deepak S. Atri; Amisha Patel; Rana Gbyli; Jennifer Kwan; Christine H. Won; Charles Dela Cruz; Christina Price; Jonathan Koff; Brett A. King; Henry M. Rinder; F. Perry Wilson; John Hwa; Stephanie Halene; William Damsky; David van Dijk; Alfred Ian Lee; Hyung Chun; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20185033 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Purpose Many nursing homes worldwide have been hit by outbreaks of the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2). We aimed to assess the contribution of a- and presymptomatic residents and healthcare workers in transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in three nursing homes. Methods Two serial point- prevalence SERO surveys, 1 week apart, among residents and healthcare workers of three Dutch nursing homes with recent SARS-CoV-2 introduction MESHD. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal testing for SARS-CoV-2, including reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) was conducted with reporting of cycle threshold (Ct). Participants were categorized as symptomatic, presymptomatic or asymptomatic TRANS with standardized symptom assessment. Results In total, 297 residents and 542 healthcare workers participated in the study. At the first point- prevalence SERO survey, 15 residents tested positive of which one was presymptomatic (Ct value>35) and three remained asymptomatic TRANS (Ct value of 23, 30 and 32). At the second point- prevalence SERO survey one resident and one healthcare worker tested SARS-CoV-2 positive (Ct value >35 and 24, respectively) and both remained asymptomatic TRANS. Conclusion This study confirms a- and presymptomatic occurrence of Covid-19 among residents and health care workers. Ct values below 25 suggested that these cases have the potential to contribute to viral spread. However, very limited transmission TRANS impeded the ability to answer the research question. We describe factors that may contribute to the prevention of transmission TRANS and argue that the necessity of large-scale preemptive testing in nursing homes may be dependent of the local situation regarding prevalence SERO of cases in the surrounding community and infection MESHD control opportunities.

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J. Abu-Raddad

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-70006/v1 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics.Methods An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions.Results The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak.Conclusions Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Multi-species ELISA SERO for the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in animals

    Authors: Kerstin Wernike; Andrea Aebischer; Anna Michelitsch; Donata Hoffmann; Conrad Freuling; Anne Balkema-Buschmann; Annika Graaf; Thomas Mueller; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Melanie Rissmann; Dennis Rubbenstroth; Jacob Schoen; Claudia Schulz; Jakob Trimpert; Lorenz Ulrich; Asisa Volz; Thomas Mettenleiter; Martin Beer; Thamar Loser; Susanne Mangold; Christel Herzog; Dieter Schiegg; Christian Reichen; Filip Radom; Andreas Bosshart; Andreas Lehmann; Micha A. Haeuptle; Alexander Zuercher; Toni Vagt; Gabriel Sigrist; Marcel Straumann; Karl Proba; Niina Veitonmaki; Keith M. Dawson; Christof Zitt; Jennifer Mayor; Sarah Ryter; Heyrhyoung Lyoo; Chunyan Wang; Wentao Li; Ieva Drulyte; H. Kaspar Binz; Leon de Waal; Koert J. Stittelaar; Seth Lewis; Daniel Steiner; Frank J.M. van Kuppeveld; Olivier Engler; Berend-Jan Bosch; Michael T. Stumpp; Patrick Amstutz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.26.266825 Date: 2020-08-26 Source: bioRxiv

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic with millions of infected humans and hundreds of thousands of fatalities. As the novel disease - referred to as COVID-19 - unfolded, occasional anthropozoonotic infections of animals by owners or caretakers were reported in dogs, felid species and farmed mink. Further species were shown to be susceptible under experimental conditions. The extent of natural infections of animals, however, is still largely unknown. Serological methods will be useful tools for tracing TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in animals once test systems are validated for use in different species. Here, we developed an indirect multi-species ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. The newly established ELISA SERO was validated using 59 sera of infected MESHD or vaccinated animals including ferrets, raccoon dogs, hamsters, rabbits, chickens, cattle and a cat, and a total of 220 antibody SERO-negative sera of the same animal species. Overall, a diagnostic specificity of 100.0% and sensitivity SERO of 98.31% was achieved, and the functionality with every species included in this study could be demonstrated. Hence, a versatile and reliable ELISA SERO protocol was established that enables high-throughput antibody SERO detection in a broad range of animal species, which may be used for outbreak investigations, to assess the seroprevalence SERO in susceptible species or to screen for reservoir or intermediate hosts.

    Epidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of COVID-19 Patients with Cancers MESHD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Global Data

    Authors: Xiangy Kong; Yihang Qi; Junjie Huang; Yang Zhao; Yongle Zhan; Xuzhen Qin; Zhihong Qi; Adejare (Jay) Atanda; Lei Zhang; Jing Wang; Yi Fang; Peng Jia; Asieh Golozar; Lin Zhang; Yu Jiang; Wegene Borena; Michael Meyer-Hermann; Dorothee von Laer; David Wyllie

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.20.20177311 Date: 2020-08-22 Source: medRxiv

    Background Data on the prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD in coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19)-infected patients and the severe illness incidence and mortality of COVID-19 patients with cancers MESHD remains unclear. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science, from database inception to July 15, 2020, for studies of patients with COVID-19 infection MESHD that had available comorbidity information on cancer MESHD. The primary endpoint was the pooled prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD in COVID-19 patients and the secondary endpoint was the outcomes of COVID-19-infected cancer MESHD patients with incidence of severe illness and death MESHD rate. We calculated the pooled prevalence SERO and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using a random-effects model, and performed meta-regression analyses to explore heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on continent, country, age TRANS, sample size and study design. Findings A total of 107 eligible global studies were included in the systematic review. 90 studies with 94,845 COVID-19 patients in which 4,106 patients with cancer MESHD morbidity were included in the meta-analysis for prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD morbidity among COVID-19 patients. 21 studies with 70,969 COVID-19 patients in which 3,351 patients with cancer MESHD morbidity who had severe illness MESHD or death MESHD during the studies. The overall prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD among the COVID-19 patients was 0.07 (95% CI 0.05~0.09). The cancer MESHD prevalence SERO in COVID-19 patients of Europe (0.22, 95% CI 0.17~0.28) was higher than that in Asia Pacific (0.04, 95% CI 0.03~0.06) and North America (0.05, 95% CI 0.04~0.06). The prevalence SERO of COVID-19-infected cancer MESHD patients over 60 years old was 0.10 (95% CI 0.07~0.14), higher than that of patients equal and less than 60 years old (0.05, 95% CI 0.03~0.06). The pooled prevalence SERO of severe illness among COVID-19 patients with cancers MESHD was 0.35 (95% CI 0.27~0.43) and the pooled death rate of COVID-19 patients with cancers MESHD was 0.18 (95% CI 0.14~0.18). The pooled incidence of severe illness of COVID-19 patients with cancers MESHD from Asia Pacific, Europe, and North America were 0.38(0.24, 0.52), 0.36(0.17, 0.55), and 0.26(0.20, 0.31), respectively; and the pooled death rate from Asia Pacific, Europe, and North America were 0.17(0.10, 0.24), 0.26(0.13, 0.39), and 0.19(0.13, 0.25), respectively. Interpretation To our knowledge, this study is the most comprehensive and up-to-date meta-analysis assessing the prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD among COVID-19 patients, severe illness incidence and mortality rate. The prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD varied significantly in geographical continents and ages TRANS. The COVID-19 patients with cancer MESHD were at-risk for severe illness MESHD and a high death rate. The European COVID-19 patients had the highest cancer MESHD prevalence SERO among the three continents examined and were also the most likely to progress to severe illness and death MESHD. Although the Asia Pacific COVID-19 patients had the lowest cancer MESHD prevalence SERO, their severe illness rate was similar to that of European.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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