Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 32
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    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    Disease burden and clinical severity of the first pandemic wave of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China

    Authors: Juan Yang; Xinhua Chen; Xiaowei Deng; Zhiyuan Chen; Hui Gong; Han Yan; Qianhui Wu; Huilin Shi; Shengjie Lai; Marco Ajelli; Cecile Viboud; Hongjie Yu; Lars I Eriksson; Anna Norrby-Teglund; Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren; Niklas K Bjorkstrom; Soo Aleman; Marcus Buggert; Jonas Klingstrom; Kristoffer Stralin; Johan K. Sandberg

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.27.20183228 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    The pandemic of novel coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) began in Wuhan, China, where a first wave of intense community transmission TRANS was cut short by interventions. Using multiple data source, we estimated the disease burden and clinical severity of COVID-19 by age TRANS in Wuhan from December 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020. We adjusted estimates for sensitivity SERO of laboratory assays and accounted for prospective community screenings and healthcare seeking behaviors. Rates of symptomatic cases, medical consultations, hospitalizations and deaths were estimated at 796 (95%CI: 703-977), 489 (472-509), 370 (358-384), and 36.2 (35.0-37.3) per 100,000 persons, respectively. The COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan had higher burden than the 2009 influenza pandemic or seasonal influenza, and that clinical severity was similar to that of the 1918 influenza pandemic. Our comparison puts the COVID-19 pandemic into context and could be helpful to guide intervention strategies and preparedness for the potential resurgence of COVID-19.

    A novel approach for evaluating contact patterns and risk mitigation strategies for COVID-19 in English Primary Schools with application of Structured Expert Judgement

    Authors: Stephen RJ Sparks; William P Aspinall; Ellen Brooks-Pollock; Leon Danon; Roger Cooke; Jenni Barclay; Jane Scarrow

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.13.20170068 Date: 2020-08-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background Contact patterns are the drivers of close-contacts TRANS infections, such as COVID-19. In an effort to control COVID-19 transmission TRANS in the UK, schools were closed on 23 March 2020. With social distancing in place, Primary Schools were partially re-opened on 1 June 2020, with plans to fully re-open in September 2020. The impact of social distancing and risk mitigation measures on childrens contact patterns is not known. Methods We conducted a structured expert elicitation of a sample of Primary Headteachers to quantify contact patterns within schools in pre-COVID-19 times and how these patterns were expected to change upon re-opening. Point estimates with uncertainty were determined by a formal performance SERO-based algorithm. Additionally, we surveyed school Headteachers about risk mitigation strategies and their anticipated effectiveness. Results Expert elicitation provides estimates of contact patterns that are consistent with contact surveys. We report mean number of contacts per day for four cohorts within schools along with a range at 90% confidence for the variations of contacts among individuals. Prior to lockdown, we estimate that, mean numbers per day, younger children TRANS (Reception and Year 1) made 15 contacts [range 8..35] within school, older children TRANS (Year 6) 18 contacts [range 5..55], teaching staff 25 contacts [range 4..55) and non-classroom staff 11 contacts [range 2..27]. Compared to pre-COVID times, after schools re-opened the mean number of contacts were reduced by about 53% for young children TRANS, about 62% for older children TRANS, about 60% for classroom staff and about 64% for other staff. Contacts between teaching and non-teaching staff reduced by 80%, which is consistent with other independent estimates. The distributions of contacts per person are asymmetric indicating a heavy tail of individuals with high contact numbers. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in childrens contacts as a consequence of efforts to reduce mixing with interventions such as forming groups of children TRANS (bubbles) who are organized to learn together to limit contacts. Distributions of contacts for children TRANS and adults TRANS can be used to inform COVID-19 transmission TRANS modelling. Our findings suggest that while official DfE guidelines form the basis for risk mitigation in schools, individual schools have adopted their own bespoke strategies, often going beyond the guidelines.

    Antibody SERO prevalence SERO for SARS-CoV-2 in England following first peak of the pandemic: REACT2 study in 100,000 adults TRANS

    Authors: Helen Ward; Christina J Atchison; Matthew Whitaker; Kylie E. C. Ainslie; Joshua Elliott; Lucy C Okell; Rozlyn Redd; Deborah Ashby; Christl A. Donnelly; Wendy Barclay; Ara Darzi; Graham Cooke; Steven Riley; Paul Elliott; Rachel Vreeman; Joseph Masci; Nick A Maskell; Shaney Barratt

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.12.20173690 Date: 2020-08-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background England, UK has experienced a large outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. As in USA and elsewhere, disadvantaged communities have been disproportionately affected. Methods National REal-time Assessment of Community Transmission TRANS-2 (REACT-2) seroprevalence SERO study using self-administered lateral flow immunoassay SERO (LFIA) test for IgG among a random population sample of 100,000 adults TRANS over 18 years in England, 20 June to 13 July 2020. Results Completed questionnaires were available for 109,076 participants, yielding 5,544 IgG positive results and adjusted (for test performance SERO), re-weighted (for sampling) prevalence SERO of 6.0% (95% CI: 5.8, 6.1). Highest prevalence SERO was in London (13.0% [12.3, 13.6]), among people of Black or Asian (mainly South Asian) ethnicity (17.3% [15.8, 19.1] and 11.9% [11.0, 12.8] respectively) and those aged TRANS 18-24 years (7.9% [7.3, 8.5]). Care home workers with client-facing roles had adjusted odds ratio of 3.1 (2.5, 3.8) compared with non-essential workers. One third (32.2%, [31.0-33.4]) of antibody SERO positive individuals reported no symptoms. Among symptomatic cases, the majority (78.8%) reported symptoms during the peak of the epidemic in England in March (31.3%) and April (47.5%) 2020. We estimate that 3.36 million (3.21, 3.51) people have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 in England to end June 2020, with an overall infection MESHD fatality ratio of 0.90% (0.86, 0.94). Conclusion The pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in England disproportionately affected ethnic minority groups and health and care home workers. The higher risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD in these groups may explain, at least in part, their increased risk of hospitalisation and mortality from COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO survey among 18,000 healthcare and administrative personnel at hospitals, pre-hospital services, and specialist practitioners in the Central Denmark Region

    Authors: Sanne Jespersen; Susan Mikkelsen; Thomas Greve; Kathrine Agergaard Kaspersen; Martin Tolstrup; Jens Kjaergaard Boldsen; Jacob Dvinge Redder; Kent Nielsen; Anders Moensted Abildgaard; Henrik Albert Kolstad; Lars Oestergaard; Marianne Kragh Thomsen; Holger Jon Moeller; Christian Erikstrup

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171850 Date: 2020-08-12 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to perform a large seroprevalence SERO survey on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) among Danish healthcare workers to identify high risk groups. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: All healthcare workers and administrative personnel at the seven hospitals, pre-hospital services and specialist practitioner clinics in the Central Denmark Region were invited by e-mail to be tested for antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 by a commercial SARS-CoV-2 total antibody SERO enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO, Wantai Biological Pharmacy Enterprise Co., Ltd., Beijing, China). Participants: A total of 25,950 participants were invited. Of these, 17,987 (69%) showed up for blood SERO sampling, and 17,971 had samples available for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO testing. Main outcome measures: 1) Prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO; 2) Risk factors for seropositivity; 3) Association of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and antibodies SERO. Results: After adjustment for assay sensitivity SERO and specificity, the overall seroprevalence SERO was 3.4% (CI: 2.5%-3.8%). The seroprevalence SERO was higher in the western part of the region than in the eastern part (11.9% vs 1.2%, difference: 10.7 percentage points, CI: 9.5-12.2). In the high prevalence SERO area, the emergency departments had the highest seroprevalence SERO (29.7%) while departments without patients or with limited patient contact had the lowest seroprevalence SERO (2.2%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis with age TRANS, sex, and profession as the predictors showed that nursing staff, medical doctors, and biomedical laboratory scientists had a higher risk than medical secretaries, who served as reference (OR = 7.3, CI: 3.5-14.9; OR = 4., CI: 1.8-8.9; and OR = 5.0, CI: 2.1-11.6, respectively). Among the total 668 seropositive participants, 433 (64.8%) had previously been tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, and 50.0% had a positive RT-PCR result. A total of 98% of individuals who had a previous positive viral RNA test were also found to be seropositive. Conclusions: We found large differences in the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in staff working in the healthcare sector within a small geographical area of Denmark and signs of in-hospital transmission TRANS. Half of all seropositive staff had been tested positive by PCR prior to this survey. This study raises awareness of precautions which should be taken to avoid in-hospital transmission TRANS. Additionally, regular testing of healthcare workers for SARS-CoV-2 should be considered to identify areas with increased transmission TRANS. Trial registration: The study is approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (1-16-02-207-20).

    Management Strategies for People Experiencing Sheltered Homelessness during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Clinical Outcomes and Costs

    Authors: Kenneth A. Freedberg; Travis P. Baggett; Justine A. Scott; Mylinh H. Le; Fatma M. Shebl; Christopher Panella; Elena Losina; Clare Flanagan; Jessie Gaeta; Anne M. Neilan; Emily P. Hyle; Amir M. Mohareb; Krishna P. Reddy; Mark P. Siedner; Guy Harling; Milton C. Weinstein; Andrea Ciaranello; Pooyan Kazemian; Bruno Bezerril Andrade; Fabiano P da Silva; Helder I Nakaya; Marcos C Borges; Benedito AL Fonseca; Valdes R Bollela; Cristina M Del-Ben; Fernando Q Cunha Sr.; Dario S Zamboni; Rodrigo C Santana; Fernando C Vilar; Paulo Louzada-Junior; Rene D R Oliveira

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.20170498 Date: 2020-08-11 Source: medRxiv

    ABSTRACT Importance: Approximately 356,000 people stay in homeless shelters nightly in the US. These individuals are at high risk for COVID-19. Objective: To assess clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of strategies for COVID-19 prevention and management among sheltered homeless adults TRANS. Design: We developed a dynamic microsimulation model of COVID-19. We modeled sheltered homeless adults TRANS in Boston, Massachusetts, using cohort characteristics and costs from Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program. Disease progression, transmission TRANS, and clinical outcomes data were from published literature and national databases. We examined surging, growing, and slowing epidemics (effective reproduction numbers TRANS [Re] 2.6, 1.3, and 0.9). Costs were from a health care sector perspective; time horizon was 4 months. Setting & Participants: Simulated cohort of 2,258 adults TRANS residing in homeless shelters in Boston. Interventions: We assessed combinations of daily symptom screening with same-day polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of screen-positive individuals, universal PCR testing every 2 weeks, hospital-based COVID-19 care, alternate care sites [ACSs] for mild/moderate COVID-19 management, and moving people from shelters to temporary housing, compared to no intervention. Main Outcomes: Infections, hospital-days, costs, and cost-effectiveness. Results: Compared to no intervention, daily symptom screening with ACSs for those with pending tests or confirmed COVID-19 and mild/moderate disease leads to 37% fewer infections MESHD and 46% lower costs when Re=2.6, 75% fewer infections MESHD and 72% lower costs when Re=1.3, and 51% fewer infections MESHD and 51% lower costs when Re=0.9. Adding universal PCR testing every 2 weeks further decreases infections in all epidemic scenarios, with incremental cost per case prevented of $1,000 (Re=2.6), $27,000 (Re=1.3), and $71,000 (Re=0.9). In all scenarios, moving shelter residents to temporary housing with universal PCR testing every 2 weeks is most effective but substantially more costly than other options. Results are most sensitive to the cost and sensitivity SERO of PCR testing and the efficacy of ACSs in preventing transmission TRANS. Conclusions & Relevance: Daily symptom screening and ACSs for sheltered homeless adults TRANS will substantially decrease COVID-19 cases and reduce costs compared to no intervention. In a surging epidemic, adding universal PCR testing every 2 weeks further decreases cases at modest incremental cost and should be considered. Keywords: Homelessness, COVID-19, cost-effectiveness analysis, simulation model

    CRISPR-based and RT-qPCR surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 in asymptomatic TRANS individuals uncovers a shift in viral prevalence SERO among a university population

    Authors: Jennifer N Rauch; Eric Valois; Jose Carlos Ponce-Rojas; Zach Aralis; Ryan L Lach; Francesca Zappa; Morgane Audouard; Sabrina C Solley; Chinmay Vaidya; Michael Costello; Holly Smith; Ali Javanbakht; Betsy Malear; Laura Polito; Stewart Comer; Katherine Arn; Kenneth S Kosik; Diego Acosta-Alvear; Maxwell Z Wilson; Lynn Fitzgibbons; Carolina Arias

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.06.20169771 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The progress of the COVID-19 pandemic profoundly impacts the health of communities around the world, with unique impacts on colleges and universities. Transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 by asymptomatic TRANS people is thought to be the underlying cause of a large proportion of new infections. However, the local prevalence SERO of asymptomatic TRANS and pre-symptomatic carriers TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 is influenced by local public health restrictions and the community setting. Objectives: This study has three main objectives. First, we looked to establish the prevalence SERO of asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD on a university campus in California. Second, we sought to assess the changes in viral prevalence SERO associated with the shifting community conditions related to non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). Third, we aimed to compare the performance SERO of CRISPR- and PCR-based assays for large-scale virus surveillance sampling in COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS persons. Methods: We enrolled 1,808 asymptomatic TRANS persons for self-collection of oropharyngeal (OP) samples to undergo SARS-CoV-2 testing. We compared viral prevalence SERO in samples obtained in two time periods: May 28th-June 11th; June 23rd-July 2nd. We detected viral genomes in these samples using two assays: CREST, a CRISPR-based method recently developed at UCSB, and the RT-qPCR test recommended by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results: Of the 1,808 participants, 1,805 were affiliates of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and 1,306 were students. None of the tests performed on the 732 samples collected between late May to early June were positive. In contrast, tests performed on the 1076 samples collected between late June to early July, revealed nine positive cases. This change in prevalence SERO met statistical significance, p = 0.013. One sample was positive by RT-qPCR at the threshold of detection, but negative by both CREST and CLIA-confirmation testing. With this single exception, there was perfect concordance in both positive and negative results obtained by RT-qPCR and CREST. The estimated prevalence SERO of the virus, calculated using the confirmed cases TRANS, was 0.74%. The average age TRANS of our sample population was 28.33 (18-75) years, and the average age TRANS of the positive cases was 21.7 years (19-30). Conclusions: Our study revealed that there were no COVID-19 cases in our study population in May/June. Using the same methods, we demonstrated a substantial shift in prevalence SERO approximately one month later, which coincided with changes in community restrictions and public interactions. This increase in prevalence SERO, in a young and asymptomatic TRANS population which would not have otherwise accessed COVID-19 testing, indicated the leading wave of a local outbreak, and coincided with rising case counts in the surrounding county and the state of California. Our results substantiate that large, population-level asymptomatic TRANS screening using self-collection may be a feasible and instructive aspect of the public health approach within large campus communities, and the almost perfect concordance between CRISPR- and PCR-based assays indicate expanded options for surveillance testing

    Transient dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 as England exited national lockdown

    Authors: Steven Riley; Kylie E. C. Ainslie; Oliver Eales; Caroline E Walters; Haowei Wang; Christina J Atchison; Peter Diggle; Deborah Ashby; Christl A. Donnelly; Graham Cooke; Wendy Barclay; Helen Ward; Ara Darzi; Paul Elliott

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.05.20169078 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Control of the COVID-19 pandemic requires a detailed understanding of prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the population. Case-based surveillance is necessarily biased towards symptomatic individuals and sensitive to varying patterns of reporting in space and time. The real-time assessment of community transmission TRANS antigen study (REACT-1) is designed to overcome these limitations by obtaining prevalence SERO data based on a nose and throat swab RT-PCR test among a representative community-based sample in England, including asymptomatic TRANS individuals. Here, we describe results comparing rounds 1 and 2 carried out during May and mid June / early July 2020 respectively across 315 lower tier local authority areas. In round 1 we found 159 positive samples from 120,620 tested swabs while round 2 there were 123 positive samples from 159,199 tested swabs, indicating a downwards trend in prevalence SERO from 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11%, 0.15%) to 0.077% (0.065%, 0.092%), a halving time of 38 (28, 58) days, and an R of 0.89 (0.86, 0.93). The proportion of swab-positive participants who were asymptomatic TRANS at the time of sampling increased from 69% (61%, 76%) in round 1 to 81% (73%, 87%) in round 2. Although health care and care home workers were infected far more frequently than other workers in round 1, the odds were markedly reduced in round 2. Age TRANS patterns of infection MESHD changed between rounds, with a reduction by a factor of five in prevalence SERO in 18 to 24 year olds. Our data were suggestive of increased risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD in Black and Asian (mainly South Asian) ethnicities. Using regional and detailed case location data, we detected increased infection intensity in and near London. Under multiple sensitivity SERO analyses, our results were robust to the possibility of false positives. At the end of the initial lockdown in England, we found continued decline in prevalence SERO and a shift in the pattern of infection by age TRANS and occupation. Community-based sampling, including asymptomatic TRANS individuals, is necessary to fully understand the nature of ongoing transmission TRANS.

    TClustVID: A Novel Machine Learning Classification MESHD Model to Investigate Topics and Sentiment inCOVID-19 Tweets

    Authors: Md. Shahriare Satu; Md. Imran Khan; Mufti Mahmud; Shahadat Uddin; Matthew A Summers; Julian M. W. Quinn; Mohammad Ali Moni

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20167973 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    COVID-19, caused by the SARS-Cov2, varies greatly in its severity but represent serious respiratory symptoms with vascular and other complications, particularly in older adults TRANS. The disease can be spread TRANS by both symptomatic and asymptomatic TRANS infected individuals, and remains uncertainty over key aspects of its infectivity, no effective remedy yet exists and this disease causes severe economic effects globally. For these reasons, COVID-19 is the subject of intense and widespread discussion on social media platforms including Facebook and Twitter. These public forums substantially impact on public opinions in some cases and exacerbate widespread panic and misinformation spread during the crisis. Thus, this work aimed to design an intelligent clustering-based classification and topics extracting model (named TClustVID) that analyze COVID-19-related public tweets to extract significant sentiments with high accuracy. We gathered COVID-19 Twitter datasets from the IEEE Dataport repository and employed a range of data preprocessing methods to clean the raw data, then applied tokenization and produced a word-to-index dictionary. Thereafter, different classifications were employed to Twitter datasets which enabled exploration of the performance SERO of traditional and TClustVID classification methods. TClustVID showed higher performance SERO compared to the traditional classifiers determined by clustering criteria. Finally, we extracted significant topic clusters from TClustVID, split them into positive, neutral and negative clusters and implemented latent dirichlet allocation for extraction of popular COVID-19 topics. This approach identified common prevailing public opinions and concerns related to COVID-19, as well as attitudes to infection MESHD prevention strategies held by people from different countries concerning the current pandemic situation.

    Incidence and outcomes of healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections: significance of delayed diagnosis and correlation with staff absence

    Authors: Kirstin Khonyongwa; Surabhi K Taori; Ana Soares; Nergish Desai; Malur Sudhanva; William Bernal; Silke Schelenz; Lisa A Curran

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.24.20148262 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The sudden increase in COVID-19 admissions in hospitals during the SARS-CoV2 pandemic of 2020 has led to onward transmissions TRANS among vulnerable inpatients. Aims: This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence SERO and clinical outcomes of Healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections (HA-COVID-19) during the 2020 epidemic and study factors which may promote or correlate with its incidence and transmission TRANS in a London Teaching Hospital Trust. Methods: Electronic laboratory, patient and staff self-reported sickness records were interrogated for the period 1st March to 18th April 2020. HA-COVID-19 was defined as symptom onset TRANS >14d of admission. Test performance SERO of a single combined throat and nose swab (CTNS) for patient placement and the effect of delayed RNA positivity (DRP, defined as >48h delay) on patient outcomes was evaluated. The incidence of staff self-reported COVID-19 sickness absence, hospital bed occupancy, community incidence and DRP was compared HA-COVID-19. The incidence of other significant hospital-acquired bacterial infections MESHD (OHAI) was compared to previous years. Results: 58 HA-COVID-19 (7.1%) cases were identified. As compared to community-acquired cases, significant differences were observed in age TRANS (p=0.018), ethnicity (p<0.001) and comorbidity burden (p<0.001) but not in 30d mortality. CTNS negative predictive value SERO was 60.3%. DRP was associated with greater mortality (p=0.034) and 34.5% HA-COVID-19 cases could be traced TRANS to delayed diagnosis in CA-COVID-19. Incidence of HA-COVID-19 correlated positively with DRP (R=0.7108) and staff sickness absence (R=0.7815). OHAI rates were similar to previous 2 years. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and isolation of COVID-19 would help reduce transmission TRANS. A single CTNS has limited value in segregating patients into positive and negative pathways.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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