Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 45
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    COVID-19 herd immunity in the Brazilian Amazon

    Authors: Lewis F Buss; Carlos Augusto Prete Jr.; Claudia MM Abrahim; Alfredo Mendrone Jr.; Tassila Salomon; Cesar de Almeida-Neto; Rafael FO França; Maria C Belotti; Maria PSS Carvalho; Allyson G Costa; Myuki AE Crispim; Suzete C Ferreira; Nelson A Fraiji; Susie Gurzenda; Charles Whittaker; Leonardo T Kamaura; Pedro L Takecian; Márcio K Moikawa; Anna S Nishiya; Vanderson Rocha; Nanci A Salles; Andreza A de Souza Santos; Martirene A da Silva; Brian Custer; Manoel Barral-Netto; Moritz Kraemer; Rafael HM Pererira; Oliver G Pybus; Michael P Busch; Márcia C Castro; Christopher Dye; Vitor H Nascimento; Nuno R Faria; Ester C Sabino

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20194787 Date: 2020-09-21 Source: medRxiv

    The herd immunity threshold is the proportion of a population that must be immune to an infectious disease MESHD, either by natural infection MESHD or vaccination such that, in the absence of additional preventative measures, new cases decline and the effective reproduction number TRANS falls HP below unity. This fundamental epidemiological parameter is still unknown for the recently-emerged COVID-19, and mathematical models have predicted very divergent results. Population studies using antibody testing SERO to infer total cumulative infections can provide empirical evidence of the level of population immunity in severely affected areas. Here we show that the transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44% of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52%, after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test SERO. The seroprevalence SERO fell HP in July and August due to antibody SERO waning. After correcting for this, we estimate a final epidemic size of 66%. Although non-pharmaceutical interventions, plus a change in population behavior, may have helped to limit SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS in Manaus, the unusually high infection rate suggests that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic.

    An ELISA SERO protocol with resolution at high sample concentration reveals reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in unexposed individuals

    Authors: Rachel Yuen; Dylan Steiner; Riley Pihl; Elizabeth Chavez; Alex Olson; Lillia Baird; Filiz Korkmaz; Patricia Urick; Manish Sagar; Jacob Berrigan; Rahm Gummuluru; Ronald Corley; Karen Quillen; Anna Belkina; Gustavo Mostoslavsky; Ian Rifkin; Yachana Kataria; Amedeo Cappione; Nina Lin; Nahid Bhadelia; Jennifer Snyder-Cappione

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20192765 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted work, economy, and way of life. The SARS-CoV-2 virus displays unique features including widely varying symptoms and outcomes between infected individuals. Sensitive measurement of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies SERO would provide new insight into virus transmission TRANS dynamics, pre-existing cross-reactive immunity, and the nuances of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. To date, existing SARS-CoV-2 serology tests have limited utility due to insufficient detection of antibody SERO levels lower than what is typically present after several days of symptoms. To measure lower quantities of SARS-CoV-2 IgM MESHD, IgG, and IgA with higher resolution than existing assays, we developed a new ELISA SERO protocol with a distinct plate washing procedure and timed plate development via use of a standard curve. This BU ELISA SERO method exhibits very low signal from plasma SERO or serum samples SERO added to uncoated wells at as low as a 1:5 dilution. Use of this method revealed circulating SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) reactive antibodies SERO from blood SERO samples drawn prior to May 2019. Of our pre-pandemic cohort, no SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive IgG antibodies SERO were detected in subjects over 70 years of age TRANS, and SARS-CoV-2 NP-reactive antibodies SERO were present at similar levels to infected subjects in some individuals and very low in others. Also, samples drawn in May 2020 from two individuals with no symptoms or no known virus exposure contained SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive antibodies SERO at intermediate amounts compared with other subject groups (higher than pre-pandemic and lower than confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD). The one asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 convalescent subject in our study possessed comparable amounts of SARS-CoV-2 NP-specific IgM and IgG but drastically lower IgA than the symptomatic counterparts. Also, our assay detected positive signal from samples that gave negative results in a commercially available Lateral Flow Device (LFD) and the EUA approved Abbott IgG chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO detection. We propose that this improved ELISA SERO protocol, which is straightforward to perform, low cost, and uses readily available commercial reagents, is a useful tool to elucidate new information about SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and has promising implications for improved detection of all analytes measurable by this platform.

    Serial SARS-CoV-2 Seropravelence Studies in Delhi July-August 2020: Indications of Pre-existing Cross-reactive Antibodies SERO and Implications for Disease Progression

    Authors: Smarajit Dey

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-80259/v1 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: ResearchSquare

    Two seropravelence studies were undertaken in Delhi, the city-state capital of India, in July-August 2020, exactly one month apart, to test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Virus-tested (mostly RT-PCR) caseloads corresponding to these surveys, as of 13 days earlier to ensure antibody SERO generation, were compared. The survey conducted June 26-July 10 (sample size 21387) showed 23.48% seropravelence, (extrapolated to 4.48 mn of Delhi population of 19.1 mn), which was 79-times higher than corresponding virus-tested positives totaling 56746. Survey conducted August 1-7 (15311 samples) showed 29.1% antibody SERO-positive (5.56 mn population), and was 44x of virus-tested positive total of 125096. Pointing out that all serological surveys world-over have shown antibody SERO-positives to be higher than virus-test positives by multiples 7x to 80x, this study seeks to examine why the multiple should decline so drastically in one month, from 79x to 44x. Statistical adjustments were performed for Sampling Error and Sensitivity SERO/Specificity of the diagnostic kits. Indigenously developed COVID KAVACH ELISA SERO tests for IgG antibodies SERO to the SARS-CoV-2 virus were used for the surveys. Significantly, statistical adjustments were also done to account for the Testing Volumes and (Spot) Positivity rates at the two different times. [Spot Positivity is defined in the study and is the closest estimate of current or fresh positivity.] After all statistical revisions, the antibody SERO-positive to virus-test positive multiples stood at 53x and 37x for the two surveys. Calculating across the two sets of data, and other sensitivity SERO analysis, the study indicates that there is a significant proportion of pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies SERO (possibly to the HCoV viruses), that are seropositive in SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests, to the extent of 16%-19% of the population. The study also infers that there is an Amplification Factor of 15 in the Delhi serostudies: ie, each virus-test positive represents 14 more who are possibly asymptomatic TRANS and untested. The study forecasts a seropravelence 31%-34% for the 3rd serial serosurvey scheduled in September, whose results expected 22nd September. Limitations of the study are discussed, notably the absence of any research paper on the survey techniques, antibody testing SERO controversies, and the statistical adjustment for Testing Volumes. The study discusses how Chain-of-Transmission TRANS protocols and Decreasing Susceptible Population work in unison to slow down a pandemic, and analyses the disease progression graph of Delhi in that context. The implications of 16%-19% pre-existing antibodies SERO on disease progression in Delhi are discussed. 

    COVID-19 and human milk: SARS-CoV-2, antibodies, and neutralizing SERO capacity

    Authors: Ryan M Pace; Janet E Williams; Kirsi M Järvinen; Mandy B Belfort; Christina DW Pace; Kimberly A Lackey; Alexandra C Gogel; Phuong Nguyen-Contant; Preshetha Kanagaiah; Theresa Fitzgerald; Rita Ferri; Bridget Young; Casey Rosen-Carole; Nichole Diaz; Courtney Meehan; Beatrice Caffe; Mark Y Sangster; David J Topham; Mark A McGuire; Antti Seppo; Michelle K McGuire; Margaret E Ackerman; Lisa M Schilling; Vignesh Subbian; David Vizcaya; Lin Zhang; Ying Zhang; Hong Zhu; Li Liu; Peter Rijnbeek; George Hripcsak; Jennifer C.E Lane; Edward Burn; Christian Reich; Marc A Suchard; Talita Duarte-Salles; Krisitn Kosta; Patrick B Ryan; DANIEL PRIETO-ALHAMBRA; Christoph Lange; Georg Laue; Clemes Lier; Matthias Lindner; Georgios Marinos; Robert Markewitz; Jacob Nattermann; Rainer Noth; Peter Pickkers; Klaus F. Rabe; Alina Renz; Christoph Roecken; Jan Rupp; Annika Schaffarzyk; Alexander Scheffold; Jonas Schulte-Schrepping; Domagoj Schunck; Dirk Skowasch; Thomas Ulas; Klaus-Peter Wandinger; Michael Wittig; Johannes Zimmermann; Hauke Busch; Bimba F. Hoyer; Christoph Kaleta; Jan Heyckendorf; Matthijs Kox; Jan Rybniker; Stefan Schreiber; Joachim Schultze; Philip Rosenstiel; - HCA Lung Biological Network; - Deutsche COVID-19 Omics Initiative (DeCOI)

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20196071 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: It is not known whether SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted from mother to infant during breastfeeding, and if so whether the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk. This study was designed to evaluate 1) if SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected in milk and on the breast of infected MESHD women, 2) concentrations of milk-borne anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, and 3) the capacity of milk to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 infectivity MESHD. Methods: We collected 37 milk samples and 70 breast swabs (before and after breast washing) from 18 women recently diagnosed with COVID-19. Samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-qPCR. Milk was also analyzed for IgA and IgG specific for the nucleocapsid protein, receptor binding domain (RBD), S2 subunit of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, as well as 2 seasonal coronaviruses using ELISA SERO; and for its ability to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Results: We did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in any milk sample. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected on several breast swabs, although only one was considered conclusive. All milk contained SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA and IgG, and levels of anti-RBD IgA correlated with SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Strong correlations between levels of IgA and IgG to SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal coronaviruses were noted. Conclusions: Our data do not support maternal-to- child TRANS transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 via milk; however, risk of transmission TRANS via breast skin MESHD should be further evaluated. Importantly, milk produced by infected mothers is a source of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 activity. These results support recommendations to continue breastfeeding during mild-to-moderate maternal COVID-19 illness.

    A dual antigen ELISA SERO allows the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in a low transmission TRANS setting

    Authors: Sarah Hicks; Kai Pohl; Teresa Neeman; Hayley McNamara; Kate Parsons; Jin-Shu He; Sidra Ali; Samina Nazir; Louise Rowntree; Thi Nguyen; Katherine Kedzierska; Denise Doolan; Carola Vinuesa; Matthew Cook; Nicholas Coatsworth; Paul Myles; Florian Kurth; Leif Sander; Russell Gruen; Graham Mann; Amee George; Elizabeth Gardiner; Ian Cockburn; Bala Pesala; Debojyoti Chakraborty; Souvik Maiti

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191031 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Estimates of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been hampered by inadequate assay sensitivity SERO and specificity. Using an ELISA SERO-based approach to that combines data about IgG responses to both the Nucleocapsid and Spike-receptor binding domain antigens, we show that near-optimal sensitivity SERO and specificity can be achieved. We used this assay to assess the frequency of virus-specific antibodies SERO in a cohort of elective surgery patients in Australia and estimated seroprevalence SERO in Australia to be 0.28% (0 to 0.72%). These data confirm the low level of transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in Australia before July 2020 and validate the specificity of our assay.

    Retrospective study of COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors at the onset of the outbreak before implementation of strict lockdown measures in France

    Authors: Nicolas Germain; Stephanie Herwegh; Anne Sophie Hatzfeld; Laurence Bocket; Brigitte Prevost; Pierre Marie Danze; Philippe Marchetti; Rachael Dodd; Brooke Nickel; Kristen Pickles; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Kirsten J McCaffery; Aboubacar Sidiki Magassouba; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.20192518 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has altered organ and tissue donations as well as transplantation practices. SARS-CoV-2 serological tests SERO could help in the selection of donors. We assessed COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO in a population of tissue donors, at the onset of the outbreak in France, before systematic screening of donors for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Methods: 235 tissue donors at the Lille Tissue bank between November 1, 2019 and March 16, 2020 were included. Archived serum SERO samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using two FDA-approved kits. Results: Most donors were at higher risks for severe COVID-19 illness including age TRANS over 65 years (142/235) and/or presence of co-morbidities (141/235). According to the COVID-19 risk assessment of transmission TRANS, 183 out of 235 tissue donors presented with a low risk level and 52 donors with an intermediate risk level of donor derived infection MESHD. Four out of the 235 (1.7%) tested specimens were positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO: 2 donors with anti-N protein IgG and 2 other donors with anti-S protein total Ig. None of them had both type of antibodies SERO. Conclusion: Regarding the seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors, we concluded that the transmission TRANS probability to recipient via tissue products was very low at the beginning of the outbreak.

    Insights into the practical effectiveness of RT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 from serologic data, a cohort study

    Authors: Zhen Zhang; Qifang Bi; Shisong Fang; Lan Wei; Xin Wang; Jianfan He; Yongsheng Wu; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20182469 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Virologic detection of SARS-CoV-2 through Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) has limitations for surveillance. Serologic tests SERO can be an important complementary approach. Objective: Assess the practical performance SERO of RT-PCR based surveillance protocols, and the extent of undetected SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS in Shenzhen, China. Design: Cohort study nested in a public health response. Setting: Shenzhen, China; January-May 2020. Participants: 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS of confirmed COVID-19 cases and 400 residents without known exposure (main analysis). Fifty-seven PCR-positive case contacts (timing analysis). Measurements: Virological testing by RT-PCR. Measurement of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in PCR-negative contacts 2-15 weeks after initial testing using total Ab ELISA SERO. Rates of undetected infection MESHD, performance SERO of RT-PCR over the course of infection MESHD, and characteristics of seropositive but PCR-negative individuals were assessed. Results: The adjusted seropositivity rate for total Ab among 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS was 4.1% (95%CI, 2.9% to 5.7%), significantly higher than among residents without known exposure to cases (0.0%, 95%CI, 0.0% to 1.0%). PCR-positive cases were 8.0 times (RR; 95% CI, 5.3 to 12.7) more likely to report symptoms than the PCR-negative individuals who were seropositive, but otherwise similar. RT-PCR missed 36% (95%CI, 28% to 44%) of infected close-contacts TRANS, and false negative rates appear to be highly dependent on stage of infection MESHD. Limitations: No serological data were available on PCR-positive cases. Sample size was limited, and only 20% of PCR-negative contacts met inclusion criteria. Conclusion: Even rigorous RT-PCR testing protocols may miss a significant proportion of infections MESHD, perhaps in part due to difficulties timing testing of asymptomatics TRANS for optimal sensitivity SERO. Surveillance and control protocols relying on RT-PCR were, nevertheless, able to contain community spread in Shenzhen.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    Establishment of murine hybridoma cells producing antibodies SERO against spike protein of SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Nadezhda V Antipova; Tatyana D Larionova; Michail I Shakhparonov; Marat S Pavlyukov; Yong Kyu Lee; Arthur Feltrin; Joyce van de Leemput; Pasquale Di Carlo; Tomoyo Sawada; Kynon J. Benjamin; Helena Brentani; Joel E Kleinman; Thomas M Hyde; Daniel A Weinberger; Gianluca Ursini; Ronald McKay; Apua C.M. Paquola; Joo Heon Shin; Jennifer A Erwin; Rujiao Li; Jingyao Zeng; Lili Hao; Shuai Jiang; Hua Chen; Dali Han; Jingfa Xiao; Zhang Zhang; Wenming Zhao; Yongbiao Xue; Yiming Bao; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.29.272963 Date: 2020-08-29 Source: bioRxiv

    In 2020 the world faced the pandemic of COVID-19 - severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by a new type of coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2. To stop the spread of the disease TRANS, it is crucial to create molecular tools allowing to investigate, diagnose and treat COVID-19. One of such tools are monoclonal antibodies SERO (mAbs). In this study we describe the development of hybridoma cells that can produce mouse mAbs against receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein. These mAbs are able to specifically detect native and denaturized S protein in all tested applications including immunoblotting, immunofluorescence staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO. In addition, we showed that the obtained mAbs decreased infection rate of human cells by SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus particles in in vitro experiments. Finally, we determined the amino acid sequence of light and heavy chains of the mAbs. This information will allow to use the corresponding peptides to establish genetically engineered therapeutic antibodies SERO. To date multiple mAbs against SARS-CoV-2 proteins have been established, however due to the restrictions caused by pandemic, it is imperative to have a local source of the antibodies SERO suitable for researches and diagnostics of COVID-19. Moreover, as each mAb has a unique binding sequence, bigger sets of various antibodies SERO will allow to detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins even if the virus acquires novel mutations.

    Evaluation of commercially available immuno-magnetic agglutination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays SERO for rapid point-of-care diagnostics of COVID-19

    Authors: Maria Engel Moeller; Jeppe Fock; Pearlyn Pah; Antia De La Campa Veras; Melanie Bade; Marco Donolato; Simone Bastrup Israelsen; Jesper Eugen-Olsen; Thomas Benfield; Frederik Neess Engsig; Justin Manalac; Ana R Otrelo-Cardoso; Tho D Pham; Arjun Rustagi; Angela J Rogers; Nigam H Shah; Catherine A Blish; Jennifer R Cochran; Kari C Nadeau; Theodore S Jardetzky; James L Zehnder; Taia T Wang; Peter S Kim; Saurabh Gombar; Robert Tibshirani; Benjamin A Pinsky; Scott D Boyd

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.15.20172080 Date: 2020-08-17 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction: Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Fast, accurate and simple blood SERO-based assays for quantification of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO are urgently needed to identify infected individuals and keep track of the spread of disease TRANS. Methods: The study included 35 plasma SERO samples from 22 individuals with confirmed COVID-19 by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and 40 non COVID-19 plasma SERO samples. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM/IgA or IgG antibodies SERO were detected by a microfluidic quantitative immunomagnetic assay (IMA)(ViroTrack Sero COVID IgM+IgA/IgG Ab, Blusense Diagnostics, Denmark) and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO (( ELISA SERO) (EuroImmun Medizinische Labordiagnostika, Germany). Results: Of the 35 plasma SERO samples from the COVID-19 patients, 29 (82.9%) were positive for IgA/IgM or IgG by IMA and 29 samples (82.9%) were positive by ELISA SERO. Sensitivity SERO for only one sample per patient was 68% for IgA+IgM and 73% IgG by IMA and 73% by ELISA SERO. For samples collected 14 days after symptom onset TRANS, the sensitivity SERO of both IMA and ELISA SERO was around 90%. Specificity of the IMA reached 100% compared to 95% for ELISA IgA SERO and 97.5% for ELISA IgG SERO. Conclusion: IMA for COVID-19 is a rapid simple-to-use point of care test with sensitivity SERO and specificity similar to a commercial ELISA SERO.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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