Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Dynamic Change of COVID-19 Seroprevalence SERO among Asymptomatic TRANS Population in Tokyo during the Second Wave

    Authors: Sawako Hibino; Kazutaka Hayashida; Andrew C Ahn; Yasutaka Hayashida; Julia Bielicki; Tim Roloff; Roland Bingisser; Christian Nickel; Nina Khanna; Sarah Tschudin; Andreas Widmer; Katharina Rentsch; Hans Pargger; Martin Siegemund; Daiana Stolz; Michael Tamm; Stefano Bassetti; Michael Osthoff; Manuel Battegay; Adrian Egli; Hans H Hirsch; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.21.20198796 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Fatality rates related to COVID-19 in Japan have been low compared to Western Countries and have decreased despite the absence of lockdown. Serological tests SERO monitored across the course of the second wave can provide insights into the population-level prevalence SERO and dynamic patterns of COVID-19 infection MESHD. Objective: To assess changes in COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among asymptomatic TRANS employees working in Tokyo during the second wave. Design: We conducted an observational cohort study. Healthy volunteers working for a Japanese company in Tokyo were enrolled from disparate locations to determine seropositivity against COVID19 from May 26 to August 25, 2020. COVID-19 IgM and IgG antibodies SERO were determined by a rapid COVID19 IgM/IgG test kit using fingertip blood SERO. Across the company, tests were performed and acquired weekly. For each participant, serology tests were offered twice, separated by approximately a month, to provide self-reference of test results and to assess for seroconversion and seroreversion. Setting: Workplace setting within a large company. Participants: Healthy volunteers from 1877 employees of a large Japanese company were recruited to the study from 11 disparate locations across Tokyo. Participants having fever HP fever MESHD, cough HP cough MESHD, or shortness of breath MESHD at the time of testing were excluded. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): Seropositivity rate (SPR) was calculated by pooled data from each two-weeks window across the cohort. Either IgM or IgG positivity was defined as seropositive. Changes in immunological status against SARS-CoV-2 were determined by comparing results between two tests obtained from the same individual. Results: Six hundred fifteen healthy volunteers (mean + SD 40.8 + 10.0; range 19-69; 45.7 % female TRANS) received at least one test. Seroprevalence SERO increased from 5.8 % to 46.8 % over the course of the summer. The most dramatic increase in SPR occurred in late June and early July, paralleling the rise in daily confirmed cases TRANS within Tokyo, which peaked on August 4. Out of the 350 individuals (mean + SD 42.5 + 10.0; range 19-69; 46.0 % female TRANS) who completed both offered tests, 21.4 % of those individuals who tested seronegative became seropositive and seroreversion was found in 12.2 % of initially seropositive participants. 81.1% of IgM positive cases at first testing became IgM negative in approximately one month. Conclusions and Relevance: COVID-19 infection MESHD may have spread widely across the general population of Tokyo despite the very low fatality rate. Given the temporal correlation between the rise in seropositivity and the decrease in reported COVID-19 cases that occurred without a shut-down, herd immunity may be implicated. Sequential testing for serological SERO response against COVID-19 is useful for understanding the dynamics of COVID-19 infection at the population-level.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO in hospitalized patients in a tertiary referral center in North India

    Authors: Animesh Ray; Komal Singh; Souvick Chattopadhyay; Farha Mehdi; Gaurav Batra; Aakansha Gupta; Ayush Agarwal; Bhavesh M; Shubham Sahni; Chaithra R; Shubham Agarwal; Chitrakshi Nagpal; Gagantej B H; Umang Arora; Kartikeya Kumar Sharma; Ranveer Singh Jadon; Ashish Datt Upadhyay; Neeraj Nischal; Naval K Vikram; Manish Soneja; R M Pandey; Naveet Wig; Alessandra C. Sanchez; Haifa L. Gaza; Geraldine M. Arevalo; Coleen M. Pangilinan; Shaira A. Acosta; Melanie V. Salinas; Brian E. Schwem; Angelo D. Dela Tonga; Ma. Jowina H. Galarion; Nina Theresa P. Dungca; Stessi G. Geganzo; Neil Andrew D. Bascos; Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz; Cynthia P. Saloma; Alberto L Garcia-Basteiro

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.22.20179937 Date: 2020-08-25 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Seroprevalence SERO of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 is an important tool to estimate the true extent of infection MESHD in a population. However, seroprevalence SERO studies have been scarce in South East Asia including India, which, as of now, carries the third largest burden of confirmed cases TRANS in the world. The present study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO among hospitalized patients at one of the largest government hospital in India. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a tertiary care hospital in North India, recruited consecutive patients who were negative for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR or CB-NAAT. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO levels targeting recombinant spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein of SARS CoV-2 were estimated in serum samples SERO by the ELISA SERO method. Results: A total of 212 hospitalized patients were recruited in the study with mean age TRANS (+/-SD) of 41.2 (+/-15.4) years and 55% male TRANS population. Positive serology against SARS CoV-2 was detected in 19.8% patients(95% CI 14.7-25.8). Residency in Delhi conferred a higher frequency of seropositivity 26.5% (95% CI 19.3-34.7) as compared to that of other states 8% (95% CI 3.0-16.4) with p-value 0.001. No particular age groups TRANS or socio-economic strata showed a higher proportion of seropositivity. Conclusion: Around, one-fifth of hospitalized patients, who were not diagnosed with COVID-19 before, demonstrated seropositivity against SARS-CoV-2. While there was no significant difference in the different age groups TRANS and socio-economic classes; residence in Delhi was associated with increased risk (relative risk of 3.62, 95% CI 1.59-8.21) Key Words: SARS-CoV-2 IgG Antibody SERO, Seroprevalence SERO, Hospitalized patient, COVID-19

    Emergency high ligation in a suspected COVID-19 pediatric patient with incarcerated inguinal hernia MESHD inguinal hernia HP: a case report

    Authors: Munawir Makkadafi; Aditya Rifqi Fauzi; Amsyar Praja; Kemala Athollah; . Marcellus; . Gunadi

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-40812/v1 Date: 2020-07-09 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background SARS-Cov-2 infects MESHD not only adults TRANS, but also children TRANS, including pediatric surgery patients with acute abdomen. Here, we report a pediatric surgery case with incarcerated inguinal hernia MESHD inguinal hernia HP and suspected COVID-19.Case presentation: A 11-month-old male TRANS was brought to our emergency department with the main complaint of recurrent yellowish-green vomiting HP vomiting MESHD that was experienced from one day before admission. High fever MESHD fever HP and shortness of breath MESHD were also reported. This patient was also suffering from moderate dehydration HP dehydration MESHD. Neither history of contact with a confirmed case TRANS of COVID-19 nor traveling TRANS from any local transmission TRANS area were found. However, a SARS-CoV-2 rapid antibody test SERO revealed a positive result. A lump in the left scrotum that persisted during admission was found. Fluid resuscitation and nasogastric tube placement for decompression was performed. Manual reduction was attempted but failed to reduce the lump. Accordingly, we decided to perform an emergency high ligation using tertiary protection regulations, i.e., full personal protective equipment (PPE) for COVID-19. Intraoperatively, we found a small intestine loop trapped in the scrotum and stuck in the inguinal canal. Postoperatively, the baby was continued to be managed as a patient with COVID-19 while waiting for the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results.Conclusions During the COVID-19 pandemic, surgeons should always be aware of the possibility of cross- transmission TRANS from the patient, since children TRANS are also susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. When and wherever possible, surgeons should perform the procedure in the quickest and most effective manner to shorten exposure time with patient and anesthetic aerosols as well as using appropriate PPE.

    Antibody Testing SERO Documents the Silent Spread of SARS-CoV-2in New York Prior to the First Reported Case

    Authors: Kathrine Meyers; Lihong Liu; Wen-Hsuan Lin; Yang Luo; Michael Yin; Yumeng Wu; Sandeep Wontakal; Alex Rai; Francesca La Carpia; Sebastian Fernando; Mitra Dowlatshahi; Elad Elkayam; Ankur Garg; Leemor Joshua-Tor; John Wolk; Barbara Alpert; Marie-Laure Romney; Brianna Costabile; Edoardo Gelardi; Francesca Vallese; Oliver Clarke; Filippo Mancia; Anne-Catrin Uhlemann; Magdalena Sobieszczyk; Alan Perelson; Yaoxing Huang; Eldad Hod; David Ho

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39880/v1 Date: 2020-07-02 Source: ResearchSquare

    We developed and validated serologic assays to determine SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in select patient populations in greater New York City area early during the epidemic. We tested “discarded” serum samples SERO from February 24 to March 29 for antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 spike trimer and nucleocapsid protein. Using known durations for antibody SERO development, incubation period TRANS, serial interval TRANS, and reproductive ratio for this pandemic, we determined that introduction of SARS-CoV-2 into New York likely occurred between January 23 and February 4, 2020. SARS-CoV-2 spread silently for 4–5 weeks before the first community acquired infection MESHD was reported. A novel coronavirus emerged in December 2019 in Wuhan, China1,2 and devasted Hubei Province in early 2020 before spreading to every province within China and nearly every country in the world3. This pathogen, now termed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2), has caused a global pandemic, with ~ 10 million cases and over 500,000 deaths MESHD reported through June 30, 20203. The first case of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in the United States was identified on January 19, 2020 in a man who returned to the State of Washington from Wuhan4. In the ensuing months, the U.S. has become a hotspot of the pandemic, presently accounting for almost one third of the total caseload and over one fourth of the deaths3. The first confirmed case TRANS in New York was reported on March 1 in a traveler recently returned from Iran. The first community-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD was diagnosed on March 3 in a 50-year-old male TRANS who lived in New Rochelle and worked in New York City (https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/covid/covid-19-data-archive.page.) In the ensuing 18 weeks, New York City has suffered a peak daily infection number of ~ 4,500 (Fig. 1a) and a cumulative caseload of ~ 400,000 to date. The time period when SARS-CoV-2 gained entry into this epicenter of the pandemic remains unclear.

    Epidemiological Characteristics of COVID-19 Patients in Vietnam and a Description of Disease Control and Prevention Measures in Thai Binh Province

    Authors: Van Thuan Hoang; Thi Dung Pham; Thi Loi Dao; Duc Thanh Nguyen; Van Nghiem Dang; Thanh Tung Dao; Van Luong Nguyen; Quang Huy Dang; Xuan Cap Do; Van Thom Nguyen; Van Diu Pham; Phong Tuc Vu; Nang Trong Hoang; Philippe Gautret; Duy Cuong Nguyen

    id:10.20944/preprints202005.0197.v1 Date: 2020-05-11 Source: Preprints.org

    IntroductionThe aim of this study is to describe the epidemiology of all COVID-19 patients in Vietnam and to describe the measures of disease control and prevention implemented. MethodsData were recovered from Wikipedia regarding the 2020 coronavirus pandemic in Vietnam. The period covered was from 23 January to 20 April 2020. Descriptive analysis was stratified by gender TRANS, age TRANS, country of origin, travel TRANS history, clinical symptoms and outcome. A survey of disease control and prevention measures was conducted at the Centre for Disease Control in the Thai Binh province, which is responsible for screening and isolating individuals at high risk of COVID-19. ResultsAs of 20 April 2020, Vietnam had recorded 268 confirmed COVID-19 patients. 55.2% were female TRANS. 67.9% were aged TRANS 20-49 years and 82.5% were Vietnamese. 60.4% of cases were imported from outside Vietnam. Other cases were acquired in Vietnam by individuals in close contact TRANS with imported cases. Only one patient who had not travelled TRANS had had no known contact with a confirmed case TRANS. 63.1% of patients were asymptomatic TRANS. 75.7% of patients were discharged. No deaths were recorded. The Thai Binh CDC surveyed a total of 2,203 persons at risk of COVID-19. 336 persons (15.2%) were isolated at hospitals and 1,411 (64.0%) in dedicated isolation facilities. 16.4% reported at least one respiratory symptom. No positive cases confirmed TRANS by RT-PCR have been reported in the Thai Binh province to date. ConclusionThe effect of the systematic screening and isolation strategy made it possible to limit local transmission TRANS in Vietnam. Vietnam needs to reinforce diagnostic capacities, prevention measures and provide the necessary epidemiological data on which to base interventions. The wider use of rapid serological tests SERO is also advisable in order to be able to conduct extensive screening in the community.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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