Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Seroprevalence SERO of Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in US Blood SERO Donors

    Authors: Ralph R Vassallo; Marjorie D Bravo; Larry J Dumont; Kelsey Hazegh; Hany Kamel; Ehab F Abdo; Benjamin S Abella; Javed Akram; Ravi K Amaravadi; Derek C Angus; Yaseen M Arabi; Shehnoor Azhar; Lindsey R Baden; Arthur W Baker; Leila Belkhir; Thomas Benfield; Marvin A H Berrevoets; Cheng-Pin Chen; Tsung-Chia Chen; Shu-Hsing Cheng; Chien-Yu Cheng; Wei-Sheng Chung; Yehuda Z Cohen; Lisa N Cowan; Olav Dalgard; Fernando F de Almeida e Val; Marcus V G de Lacerda; Gisely C de Melo; Lennie Derde; Vincent Dubee; Anissa Elfakir; Anthony C Gordon; Carmen M Hernandez-Cardenas; Thomas Hills; Andy I M Hoepelman; Yi-Wen Huang; Bruno Igau; Ronghua Jin; Felipe Jurado-Camacho; Khalid S Khan; Peter G Kremsner; Benno Kreuels; Cheng-Yu Kuo; Thuy Le; Yi-Chun Lin; Wu-Pu Lin; Tse-Hung Lin; Magnus Nakrem Lyngbakken; Colin McArthur; Bryan McVerry; Patricia Meza-Meneses; Wuelton M Monteiro; Susan C Morpeth; Ahmad Mourad; Mark J Mulligan; Srinivas Murthy; Susanna Naggie; Shanti Narayanasamy; Alistair Nichol; Lewis A Novack; Sean M O'Brien; Nwora Lance Okeke; Lena Perez; Rogelio Perez-Padilla; Laurent Perrin; Arantxa Remigio-Luna; Norma E Rivera-Martinez; Frank W Rockhold; Sebastian Rodriguez-Llamazares; Robert Rolfe; Rossana Rosa; Helge Rosjo; Vanderson S Sampaio; Todd B Seto; Muhammad Shehzad; Shaimaa Soliman; Jason E Stout; Ireri Thirion-Romero; Andrea B Troxel; Ting-Yu Tseng; Nicholas A Turner; Robert J Ulrich; Stephen R Walsh; Steve A Webb; Jesper M Weehuizen; Maria Velinova; Hon-Lai Wong; Rebekah Wrenn; Fernando G Zampieri; Wu Zhong; David Moher; Steven N Goodman; John P A Ioannidis; Lars G Hemkens

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.17.20195131 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background To identify blood SERO donors eligible to donate Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) Convalescent Plasma SERO (CCP), a large blood SERO center began testing for antibodies SERO to SARS-CoV-2, the etiologic agent of COVID-19. We report the seroprevalence SERO of total immunoglobulin directed against the S1 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in US blood SERO donors. Methods Unique non-CCP donor sera from June 1-July 31, 2020 were tested with the Ortho VITROS Anti-SARS-CoV-2 total immunoglobulin assay (positive: signal-to-cutoff (S/C) =>1). Donor age TRANS, sex, race/ethnicity, ABO/RhD, education, and experience were compared to June and July 2019. Multivariate regressions were conducted to identify demographics associated with the presence of antibodies SERO and with S/C values. Results Unique donors (n=252,882) showed an overall seroprevalence SERO of 1.83% in June (1.37%) and July (2.26%), with the highest prevalence SERO in northern New Jersey (7.3%). In a subset of donors with demographic information (n=189,565), higher odds of antibody SERO reactivity were associated with non-Hispanic Native American/Alaskan (NH-NAA/A) and Black (NH-B), and Hispanic (H) race/ethnicity, age TRANS 18-64, middle school or lesser education, blood SERO Group A, and never or non-recent donor status. In positive donors (n=2,831), antibody SERO signal was associated with male TRANS sex, race/ethnicity (NH-NAA/A, NH-B and H) and geographic location. Conclusions Seroprevalence SERO remains low in US blood SERO donors but varies significantly by region. Temporal trends in reactivity may be used to gauge the effectiveness of public health measures. Before generalizing these data from healthy donors to the general population however, rates must be corrected for false positive test results among low prevalence SERO test subjects and adjusted to match the wider demography.

    Variation across population subgroups of COVID-19 antibody testing SERO performance SERO

    Authors: Halley L Brantley; Richard M Yoo; Glen I Jones; Marel A Stock; Peter J Park; Natalie E Sheils; Isaac S Kohane; Mariya Lytvyn; María Isabel Guillén; David Sanz-Rosa; Daniel Martín-Pérez; Cristina Sanchez-Ramos; Ricardo Garcia; Juan Antonio Bernal; Sijia Tao; Tristan R Horton; Elizabeth N Beagle; Ernestine A Mahar; Michelle YH Lee; Joyce Cohen; Sherrie Jean; Jennifer S Wood; Fawn Connor-Stroud; Rachelle L Stammen; Olivia M Delmas; Shelly Wang; Kimberly A Cooney; Michael N Sayegh; Lanfang Wang; Daniela Weiskopf; Peter D Filev; Jesse Waggoner; Anne Piantadosi; Sudhir P Kasturi; Hilmi Al-Shakhshir; Susan P Ribeiro; Rafick P Sekaly; Rebecca D Levit; Jacob D Estes; Thomas H Vanderford; Raymond F Schinazi; Steven E Bosinger; Mirko Paiardini

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.14.20191833 Date: 2020-09-16 Source: medRxiv

    Understanding variations in the performance SERO of serological tests SERO for SARS-CoV-2 across varying demographics is relevant to clinical interpretations and public policy derived from their results. Appropriate use of serological assays SERO to detect anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO requires estimation of their accuracy over large populations and an understanding of the variance in performance SERO over time and across demographic groups. In this manuscript we focus on anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody SERO tests approved under emergency use authorizations and determine the recall SERO of the serological tests SERO compared to RT-PCR tests by Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINCs). Variability in test performance SERO was further examined over time and by demographics. The recall SERO of the most common IgG assay (LOINC 94563-4) was 91.2% (95% CI: 90.5%, 91.9%). IgA (LOINC 94562-6) and IgM (94564-2) assays performed significantly worse than IgG assays with estimated recall SERO rates of 20.6% and 27.3%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in recall SERO (p = 0.019) was observed across sex with a higher recall SERO in males TRANS than females TRANS, 92.1% and 90.4%, respectively. Recall SERO also differed significantly by age group TRANS, with higher recall SERO in those over 45 compared to those under 45, 92.9% and 88.0%, respectively (p < 0.001). While race was unavailable for the majority of the individuals, a significant difference was observed between recall SERO in White individuals and Black individuals (p = 0.007) and White individuals and Hispanic individuals (p=0.001). The estimates of recall SERO were 89.3%, 95.9%, and 94.2% for White, Black, and Hispanic individuals respectively.

    Alternative or Complementary Role of Serological Rapid Antibody Test SERO in the Management of Possible COVID-19 Cases

    Authors: Fatma Yildirim; Pinar Yildiz Gulhan; Ozlem Ercen Diken; Aylin Capraz; Meltem Simsek; Berna Botan Yildirim; Muhammet Ridvan Taysi; Sakine Yilmaz Ozturk; Nurcan Demirtas; Julide Ergil; Adem Dirican; Tugce Uzar; Irem Karaman; Sevket OZKAYA; Elisa Resconi; Monica I Lupei; Christopher J Tignanelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.13.20193615 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Although the gold diagnostic method for COVID-19 is accepted as the detection of viral particles by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), serology testing for SARS-CoV-2 is at increased demand. A primary aim for utilization of serological tests SERO are to better quantify the number of COVID-19 cases including those RT-PCR samples were negative but showing clinical and radiological signs of COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to report the features of the patients that were diagnosed and treated as possible COVID-19 cases whose multiple nasopharyngeal swab samples were negative by RT-PCR but serological IgM/IgG antibody SERO against SARS-CoV-2 were detected by rapid antibody test SERO. Method: We retrospectively analyzed eighty suspected COVID-19 cases that have at least two negative consecutive COVID-19 PCR test and were subjected to serological rapid antibody test SERO. Result: The specific antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 were detected as positive in twenty-two patients. The mean age TRANS of patient group was 63.2+-13.1 years old with male TRANS / female TRANS ratio 11/11. Cough HP was the most common symptom with 90.9%. Most common presenting chest CT findings were bilateral ground glass opacities (77.2%) and alveolar MESHD consolidations (50.09%). The mean duration from symptom initiation to hospital admission, to hospitalization, to treatment initiation and to detection of antibody SERO positivity were 8.6 +- 7.2, 11.2 +- 5.4, 7.9 +- 3.2 and 24 +- 17 days, respectively. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated the feasibility of COVID-19 diagnosis based on rapid antibody test SERO in the cases of patients whose RT-PCR samples were negative. We suggest that the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 with rapid antibody test SERO should be included in the diagnostic algorithm in suspected COVID-19 patients.

    Antibody SERO Responses to SARS-CoV-2 in Coronavirus Diseases MESHD 2019 Patients with Different Severity

    Authors: Ekasit Kowitdamrong; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Watsamon Jantarabenjakul; Eakachai Prompetchara; Pintip Suchartlikitwong; Opass Putcharoen; Nattiya Hirankarn; Ke Lan; Yu Chen; Huabin Zhao

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.06.20189480 Date: 2020-09-08 Source: medRxiv

    Background: More understanding of antibody SERO responses in the SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD population is useful for vaccine development. Aim: To investigate SARS-CoV-2 IgA MESHD and IgG among COVID-19 Thai patients with different severity. Methods: We used plasma SERO from 118 adult TRANS patients who have confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 49 patients under investigation without infection MESHD, 20 patients with other respiratory infections MESHD, and 102 healthy controls. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO from Euroimmun. The optical density ratio cut off for positive test was 1.1 for IgA and 0.8 for IgG. The association of antibody SERO response with the severity of diseases and the day of symptoms was performed. Results: From Mar 10 to May 31, 2020, 289 participants were enrolled, and 384 samples were analyzed. Patients were categorized by clinical manifestations to mild (n=59), moderate (n=27) and severe (n=32). The overall sensitivity SERO of IgA and IgG from samples collected after day 7 is 87.9% (95% CI 79.8-93.6) and 84.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.3), respectively. The severe group had a significantly higher level of specific IgA and IgG to S1 antigen compared to the mild group. All moderate to severe patients have specific IgG while 20% of the mild group did not have any IgG detected after two weeks. Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 IgG level was significantly higher in males TRANS compared to females TRANS among the severe group (p=0.003). Conclusion: The serologic test SERO for SARS-CoV-2 has high sensitivity SERO after the second week after onset of illness. Serological response differs among patients with different severity and different sex.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar, northern India - a cross-sectional study

    Authors: S Muhammad Salim Khan; Mariya Amin Qurieshi; Inaamul Haq; Sabhiya Majid; Arif Akbar Bhat; Sahila Nabi; Nisar Ahmad Ganai; Nazia Zahoor; Auqfeen Nisar; Iqra Nisar Chowdri; Tanzeela Bashir Qazi; Rafiya Kousar; Abdul Aziz Lone; Iram Sabah; Shahroz Nabi; Ishtiyaq Ahmad Sumji; Misbah Ferooz Kawoosa; Shifana Ayoub; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Sezer Akyoney; Ilayda Sahin; Ugur Ozbek; Dilek Telci; Fikrettin Sahin; Koray Yalcin; Ercument Ovali

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.04.282640 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: bioRxiv

    BackgroundPrevalence of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD provides essential information for deciding disease prevention and mitigation measures. We estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar. Methods2906 persons >18 years of age TRANS selected from hospital visitors across District Srinagar participated in the study. We tested samples for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO-based serologic test SERO. ResultsAge- and gender TRANS-standardized seroprevalence SERO was 3.6% (95% CI 2.9% to 4.3%). Age TRANS 30-69 years, a recent history of symptoms of an influenza-like-illness, and a history of being placed under quarantine were significantly related to higher odds of the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO. The estimated number of SARS-CoV-2 infections during the two weeks preceding the study, adjusted for test performance SERO, was 32602 with an estimated (median) infection-to-known-case ratio of 46 (95% CI 36 to 57). ConclusionsThe seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO is low in the District. A large proportion of the population is still susceptible to the infection. A sizeable number of infections remain undetected, and a substantial proportion of people with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 are not tested.

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO in hospitalized patients in a tertiary referral center in North India

    Authors: Animesh Ray; Komal Singh; Souvick Chattopadhyay; Farha Mehdi; Gaurav Batra; Aakansha Gupta; Ayush Agarwal; Bhavesh M; Shubham Sahni; Chaithra R; Shubham Agarwal; Chitrakshi Nagpal; Gagantej B H; Umang Arora; Kartikeya Kumar Sharma; Ranveer Singh Jadon; Ashish Datt Upadhyay; Neeraj Nischal; Naval K Vikram; Manish Soneja; R M Pandey; Naveet Wig; Alessandra C. Sanchez; Haifa L. Gaza; Geraldine M. Arevalo; Coleen M. Pangilinan; Shaira A. Acosta; Melanie V. Salinas; Brian E. Schwem; Angelo D. Dela Tonga; Ma. Jowina H. Galarion; Nina Theresa P. Dungca; Stessi G. Geganzo; Neil Andrew D. Bascos; Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz; Cynthia P. Saloma; Alberto L Garcia-Basteiro

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.22.20179937 Date: 2020-08-25 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Seroprevalence SERO of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 is an important tool to estimate the true extent of infection MESHD in a population. However, seroprevalence SERO studies have been scarce in South East Asia including India, which, as of now, carries the third largest burden of confirmed cases TRANS in the world. The present study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO among hospitalized patients at one of the largest government hospital in India. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a tertiary care hospital in North India, recruited consecutive patients who were negative for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR or CB-NAAT. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO levels targeting recombinant spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein of SARS CoV-2 were estimated in serum samples SERO by the ELISA SERO method. Results: A total of 212 hospitalized patients were recruited in the study with mean age TRANS (+/-SD) of 41.2 (+/-15.4) years and 55% male TRANS population. Positive serology against SARS CoV-2 was detected in 19.8% patients(95% CI 14.7-25.8). Residency in Delhi conferred a higher frequency of seropositivity 26.5% (95% CI 19.3-34.7) as compared to that of other states 8% (95% CI 3.0-16.4) with p-value 0.001. No particular age groups TRANS or socio-economic strata showed a higher proportion of seropositivity. Conclusion: Around, one-fifth of hospitalized patients, who were not diagnosed with COVID-19 before, demonstrated seropositivity against SARS-CoV-2. While there was no significant difference in the different age groups TRANS and socio-economic classes; residence in Delhi was associated with increased risk (relative risk of 3.62, 95% CI 1.59-8.21) Key Words: SARS-CoV-2 IgG Antibody SERO, Seroprevalence SERO, Hospitalized patient, COVID-19

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    Performance SERO of Abbott Architect, Ortho Vitros, and Euroimmun Assays in Detecting Prior SARS-CoV-2 Infection

    Authors: Shiwani Mahajan; Carrie A Redlich; Adam V Wisnewski; Louis E Fazen; Lokinendi V Rao; Karthik Kuppusamy; Albert I Ko; Harlan M Krumholz

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164343 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Several serological assays SERO have been developed to detect anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, but evidence about their comparative performance SERO is limited. We sought to assess the sensitivity SERO of four anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays SERO ( ELISA SERO) in individuals with evidence of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Methods: We obtained sera from 36 individuals with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD between March and May 2020. We evaluated samples collected at around 21 days ({+/-}14 days) after their initial PCR test using 3 commercially available ELISA assays SERO, two anti-spike (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics Vitros, and Euroimmun) and one anti-nucleocapsid (Abbott Architect), and a Yale-developed anti-spike ELISA SERO test. We determined the sensitivity SERO of the tests and compared their results. The Euroimmun and Yale ELISA SERO had an equivocal and indeterminate category, which were considered as both negative and positive. Results: Among the 36 individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, mean age TRANS was 43 ({+/-}13) years and 19 (53%) were female TRANS. The sensitivities SERO of the tests were not significantly different (Abbott Architect, Ortho Vitros, Euroimmmun, and Yale assays: 86% (95% confidence interval [CI], 71-95), 94% (95% CI, 81-99), 86% (95% CI, 71-95), and 94% (95% CI, 81-99), respectively; p-value=0.464). The sensitivities SERO of the Euroimmun and Yale ELISA SERO tests increased when the equivocal/indeterminate results were considered positive (97% [95% CI, 85-100] and 100% [95% CI, 90-100], respectively), but were not significantly different from other tests (p=0.082). The cross-correlation coefficient ranged from 0.85-0.98 between three anti-spike protein assays (Ortho Vitros, Euroimmun, Yale) and was 0.58-0.71 between the three anti-spike protein assays and the anti-nucleocapsid assay (Abbott). Conclusion: The sensitivities SERO of four anti-SARS-CoV-2 protein assays did not significantly differ, although the sample size was small. Sensitivity SERO also depended on the interpretation of equivocal and indeterminate results. The strongest correlations were present for the three anti-spike proteins assays. These findings suggest that individual test characteristics and the correlation between different tests should be considered when comparing or aggregating data across different populations studies for serologic surveillance of past SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD.

    Estimates of the rate of infection MESHD and asymptomatic TRANS COVID-19 disease in a population sample from SE England

    Authors: Philippa M Wells; Katie M Doores; Simon Couvreur; Rocio Martin Martinez; Jeffrey Seow; Carl Graham; Sam Acors; Neophytos Kouphou; Stuart Neil; Richard Tedder; Pedro Matos; Kate Poulton; Maria Jose Lista; Ruth Dickenson; Helin Sertkaya; Thomas Maguire; Edward Scourfield; Ruth Bowyer; Deborah Hart; Aoife O'Byrne; Kathryn Steele; Oliver Hemmings; Carolina Rosadas; Myra McClure; Joan Capedevila-Pujol; Jonathan wolf; Sebastien Ourseilin; Matthew Brown; Michael Malim; Timothy Spector; Claire Steves

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20162701 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Understanding of the true asymptomatic TRANS rate of infection of SARS-CoV-2 MESHD is currently limited, as is understanding of the population-based seroprevalence SERO after the first wave of COVID-19 within the UK. The majority of data thus far come from hospitalised patients, with little focus on general population cases, or their symptoms. Methods: We undertook enzyme linked immunosorbent assay SERO characterisation of IgM and IgG responses against SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of 431 unselected general-population participants of the TwinsUK cohort from South-East England, aged TRANS 19-86 (median age TRANS 48; 85% female TRANS). 382 participants completed prospective logging of 14 COVID-19 related symptoms via the COVID Symptom Study App, allowing consideration of serology alongside individual symptoms, and a predictive algorithm for estimated COVID-19 previously modelled on PCR positive individuals from a dataset of over 2 million. Findings: We demonstrated a seroprevalence SERO of 12% (51participants of 431). Of 48 seropositive individuals with full symptom data, nine (19%) were fully asymptomatic TRANS, and 16 (27%) were asymptomatic TRANS for core COVID-19 symptoms: fever HP fever MESHD, cough HP cough MESHD or anosmia HP anosmia MESHD. Specificity of anosmia HP anosmia MESHD for seropositivity was 95%, compared to 88% for fever HP fever MESHD cough HP and anosmia HP anosmia MESHD combined. 34 individuals in the cohort were predicted to be Covid-19 positive using the App algorithm, and of those, 18 (52%) were seropositive. Interpretation: Seroprevalence SERO amongst adults TRANS from London and South-East England was 12%, and 19% of seropositive individuals with prospective symptom logging were fully asymptomatic TRANS throughout the study. Anosmia HP demonstrated the highest symptom specificity for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO response. Funding: NIHR BRC, CDRF, ZOE global LTD, RST-UKRI/MRC

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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