Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Antibody SERO Responses to SARS-CoV-2 in Coronavirus Diseases MESHD 2019 Patients with Different Severity

    Authors: Ekasit Kowitdamrong; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Watsamon Jantarabenjakul; Eakachai Prompetchara; Pintip Suchartlikitwong; Opass Putcharoen; Nattiya Hirankarn; Ke Lan; Yu Chen; Huabin Zhao

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.06.20189480 Date: 2020-09-08 Source: medRxiv

    Background: More understanding of antibody SERO responses in the SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD population is useful for vaccine development. Aim: To investigate SARS-CoV-2 IgA MESHD and IgG among COVID-19 Thai patients with different severity. Methods: We used plasma SERO from 118 adult TRANS patients who have confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 49 patients under investigation without infection MESHD, 20 patients with other respiratory infections MESHD, and 102 healthy controls. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO from Euroimmun. The optical density ratio cut off for positive test was 1.1 for IgA and 0.8 for IgG. The association of antibody SERO response with the severity of diseases and the day of symptoms was performed. Results: From Mar 10 to May 31, 2020, 289 participants were enrolled, and 384 samples were analyzed. Patients were categorized by clinical manifestations to mild (n=59), moderate (n=27) and severe (n=32). The overall sensitivity SERO of IgA and IgG from samples collected after day 7 is 87.9% (95% CI 79.8-93.6) and 84.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.3), respectively. The severe group had a significantly higher level of specific IgA and IgG to S1 antigen compared to the mild group. All moderate to severe patients have specific IgG while 20% of the mild group did not have any IgG detected after two weeks. Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 IgG level was significantly higher in males TRANS compared to females TRANS among the severe group (p=0.003). Conclusion: The serologic test SERO for SARS-CoV-2 has high sensitivity SERO after the second week after onset of illness. Serological response differs among patients with different severity and different sex.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in children TRANS - A prospective multicentre cohort study.

    Authors: Thomas Waterfield; Chris Watson; Rebecca Moore; Kathryn Ferris; Claire Tonry; Alison P Watt; Claire McGinn; Steven Foster; Jennifer Evans; Mark D Lyttle; Shazaad Ahmad; Shamez Ladhani; Michael Corr; Lisa McFetridge; Hannah Mitchell; Kevin Brown; Gayatric Amirthalingam; Julie-Ann Maney; Sharon Christie; Angela Afonso; Marc Veldhoen; Matthew Harnett; Melody Eaton; Sandra Hatem; Hajra Jamal; Alara Akyatan; Alexandra Tabachnikova; Lora E. Liharska; Liam Cotter; Brian Fennessey; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20183095 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Background Studies based on molecular testing of oral/nasal swabs underestimate SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD due to issues with test sensitivity SERO and timing of testing. The objective of this study was to report the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, consistent with previous infection MESHD, and to report the symptomatology of infection MESHD in children TRANS. Design This multicentre observational cohort study, conducted between 16th April - 3rd July 2020 at 5 UK sites, aimed to recruit 900 children TRANS aged TRANS 2 to 15 years of age TRANS. Participants provided blood SERO samples for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO testing and data were gathered regarding unwell contacts and symptoms. Results 1007 participants were enrolled, and 992 were included in the final analysis. The median age TRANS of participants was 10.1 years. There were 68 (6.9%) participants with positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests indicative of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Of these, 34/68 (50%) reported no symptoms. The presence of antibodies SERO and the mean antibody SERO titre was not influenced by age TRANS. Following multivariate analysis 4 independent variables were identified as significantly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. These were: known infected household contact TRANS; fatigue HP fatigue MESHD; gastrointestinal symptoms; and changes in sense of smell or taste. Discussion In this study children TRANS demonstrated similar antibody SERO titres in response to SARS-CoV-2 irrespective of age TRANS. The symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS were subtle but of those reported, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, gastrointestinal symptoms MESHD and changes in sense of smell or taste were most strongly associated with antibody SERO positivity. Registration This study was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov (trial registration: NCT04347408) on the 15/04/2020.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    Development and calibration of a simple mortality risk score for hospitalized COVID-19 adults TRANS

    Authors: Edwin Yoo; Bethany Percha; Max Tomlinson; Victor Razuk; Stephanie Pan; Madeleine Basist; Pranai Tandon; Jing Gennie Wang; Cynthia Gao; Sonali Bose; Umesh K Gidwani; - Cambridge Lung Cancer Early Detection Programme; - INER-Ciencias Mexican Lung Program; - NHLBI LungMAP Consortium; Margaret Neighbors; Gaik W. Tew; Michele Grimbaldeston; Nick H.T. ten Hacken; Sile Hu; Yike Guo; Xiaoyu Zhang; Kai Sun; Pieter S. Hiemstra; Bruce A. Ponder; Mika J Makela; Kristiina Malmstrom; Robert C. Rintoul; Paul A. Reyfman; Fabian J. Theis; Corry-A Brandsma; Ian Adcock; Wim Timens; Cheng J. Xu; Maarten van den Berge; Roland F. Schwarz; Gerard H. Koppelman; Martijn C. Nawijn; Alen Faiz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20185363 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: Mortality risk scores, such as SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65, are quick, effective tools for communicating a patient's prognosis and guiding therapeutic decisions. Most use simple calculations that can be performed by hand. While several COVID-19 specific risk scores exist, they lack the ease of use of these simpler scores. The objectives of this study were (1) to design, validate, and calibrate a simple, easy-to-use mortality risk score for COVID-19 patients and (2) to recalibrate SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65 in a hospitalized COVID-19 population. Design: Retrospective cohort study incorporating demographic, clinical, laboratory, and admissions data from electronic health records. Setting: Multi-hospital health system in New York City. Five hospitals were included: one quaternary care facility, one tertiary care facility, and three community hospitals. Participants: Patients (n=4840) with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV2 infection MESHD who were admitted between March 1 and April 28, 2020. Main outcome measures: Gray's K-sample test for the cumulative incidence of a competing risk was used to assess and rank 48 different variables' associations with mortality. Candidate variables were added to the composite score using DeLong's test to evaluate their effect on predictive performance SERO (AUC) of in-hospital mortality. Final AUCs for the new score, SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65 were assessed on an independent test set. Results: Of 48 variables investigated, 36 (75%) displayed significant (p<0.05 by Gray's test) associations with mortality. The variables selected for the final score were (1) oxygen support level, (2) troponin, (3) blood SERO urea nitrogen, (4) lymphocyte percentage, (5) Glasgow Coma HP Coma MESHD Score, and (6) age TRANS. The new score, COBALT, outperforms SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65 at predicting mortality in this COVID-19 population: AUCs for initial, maximum, and mean COBALT scores were 0.81, 0.91, and 0.92, compared to 0.77, 0.87, and 0.87 for SOFA. We provide COVID-19 specific mortality estimates at all score levels for COBALT, SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65. Conclusions: The COBALT score provides a simple way to estimate mortality risk in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with superior performance SERO to SOFA and other scores currently in widespread use. Evaluation of SOFA, qSOFA, and CURB-65 in this population highlights the importance of recalibrating mortality risk scores when they are used under novel conditions, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This study's approach to score design could also be applied in other contexts to create simple, practical and high-performing mortality risk scores.

    Clinical Characterisation of Lateral Flow Assays for Detection of COVID-19 Antibodies SERO in a population

    Authors: Fabian Rudolf; Hans-Michael Kaltenbach; Janina Linnik; Marie-Therese Ruf; Christoph Niederhauser; Beatrice Nickel; Daniel Gygax; Miodrag Savic; Xueying Zheng; Tengchuan Jin; Chao Jiang; Tianyang Chen; Lei Han; Hengdong Zhang; Yue Gao; Zhengmin Yu; Xiaowen Liu; Tianyu Yan; Hebi Li; Patrick Robinson; Baoli Zhu; Jie Liu; Yang Liu; Zengli Zhang; Yaorong Ge; Shi Chen

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.18.20177204 Date: 2020-08-21 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Serological assays SERO can help diagnose and determine the rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in a population. Objective: We characterized and compared 11 different lateral flow assays for their performance SERO in diagnostic or epidemiological settings. Design, Setting, Participants: We used two cohorts to determine the speci- ficity: (i) up to 350 blood SERO donor samples from past influenza seasons and (ii) up to 110 samples which tested PCR negative for SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in Switzerland. The sensitivity SERO was determined using up to 370 samples which tested PCR positive for SARS-CoV-2 during the same time and is representative for age TRANS distribution and severity. Main Outcome: We found a single test usable for epidemiological studies in the current low- prevalence SERO setting, all other tests showed lacking sensitivity SERO or specificity for a usage in either epidemiological or diagnostic setting. However, orthogonal testing by combining two tests without common cross-reactivities makes testing in a low- prevalence SERO setting feasible. Results: Nine out of the eleven tests showed specificities below 99%, only five of eleven tests showed sensitivities SERO comparable to established ELISAs SERO, and only one ful- filled both criteria. Contrary to previous results from lab assays, five tests measured an IgM response in >80% of the samples. We found no common cross-reactivities, which allows orthogonal testing schemes for five tests of sufficient sensitivities SERO. Conclusions and Relevance: This study emphasizes the need for large and diverse negative cohorts when determining specificities, and for diverse and repre- sentative positive samples when determining sensitivities SERO of lateral flow assays for SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD. Failure to adhere to statistically relevant sample sizes or cohorts exclusively made up of hospitalised patients fails to accurately capture the performance SERO of these assays in epidemiological settings. Our results allow a rational choice between tests for different use cases.

    SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO survey among 18,000 healthcare and administrative personnel at hospitals, pre-hospital services, and specialist practitioners in the Central Denmark Region

    Authors: Sanne Jespersen; Susan Mikkelsen; Thomas Greve; Kathrine Agergaard Kaspersen; Martin Tolstrup; Jens Kjaergaard Boldsen; Jacob Dvinge Redder; Kent Nielsen; Anders Moensted Abildgaard; Henrik Albert Kolstad; Lars Oestergaard; Marianne Kragh Thomsen; Holger Jon Moeller; Christian Erikstrup

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171850 Date: 2020-08-12 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to perform a large seroprevalence SERO survey on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) among Danish healthcare workers to identify high risk groups. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: All healthcare workers and administrative personnel at the seven hospitals, pre-hospital services and specialist practitioner clinics in the Central Denmark Region were invited by e-mail to be tested for antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 by a commercial SARS-CoV-2 total antibody SERO enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO, Wantai Biological Pharmacy Enterprise Co., Ltd., Beijing, China). Participants: A total of 25,950 participants were invited. Of these, 17,987 (69%) showed up for blood SERO sampling, and 17,971 had samples available for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO testing. Main outcome measures: 1) Prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO; 2) Risk factors for seropositivity; 3) Association of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and antibodies SERO. Results: After adjustment for assay sensitivity SERO and specificity, the overall seroprevalence SERO was 3.4% (CI: 2.5%-3.8%). The seroprevalence SERO was higher in the western part of the region than in the eastern part (11.9% vs 1.2%, difference: 10.7 percentage points, CI: 9.5-12.2). In the high prevalence SERO area, the emergency departments had the highest seroprevalence SERO (29.7%) while departments without patients or with limited patient contact had the lowest seroprevalence SERO (2.2%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis with age TRANS, sex, and profession as the predictors showed that nursing staff, medical doctors, and biomedical laboratory scientists had a higher risk than medical secretaries, who served as reference (OR = 7.3, CI: 3.5-14.9; OR = 4., CI: 1.8-8.9; and OR = 5.0, CI: 2.1-11.6, respectively). Among the total 668 seropositive participants, 433 (64.8%) had previously been tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, and 50.0% had a positive RT-PCR result. A total of 98% of individuals who had a previous positive viral RNA test were also found to be seropositive. Conclusions: We found large differences in the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in staff working in the healthcare sector within a small geographical area of Denmark and signs of in-hospital transmission TRANS. Half of all seropositive staff had been tested positive by PCR prior to this survey. This study raises awareness of precautions which should be taken to avoid in-hospital transmission TRANS. Additionally, regular testing of healthcare workers for SARS-CoV-2 should be considered to identify areas with increased transmission TRANS. Trial registration: The study is approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency (1-16-02-207-20).

    Impact of COVID-19 mitigation measures on the incidence of preterm birth: a national quasi-experimental study

    Authors: Jasper V Been; Lizbeth Burgos Ochoa; Loes CM Bertens; Sam Schoenmakers; Eric AP Steegers; Irwin KM Reiss

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.01.20160077 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Preterm birth is the leading cause of child TRANS mortality globally, with many survivors experiencing long-term adverse consequences. Preliminary evidence suggests that preterm births dropped dramatically following implementation of policy measures aimed at mitigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods We undertook a national quasi-experimental difference-in-regression-discontinuity approach to study the impact of the COVID-19 mitigation measures implemented in the Netherlands in a stepwise fashion on 9, 15, and 23 March 2020 on the incidence of preterm birth. We used data from the neonatal dried blood SERO spot screening programme (2010-2020) and cross-validated these against national perinatal registry data. Stratified analyses were conducted according to gestational age TRANS subgroups, and sensitivity SERO analyses to assess robustness of the findings. We explored potential effect modification by neighbourhood socio-economic status. Results Data on 1,599,549 singleton newborns were available, including 56,720 post-implementation births. Consistent reductions in preterm birth were seen across various time windows surrounding implementation of the 9 March COVID-19 mitigation measures: +/- 2 months (n=531,823): odds ratio 0.77 (95% confidence interval 0.66-0.91), p=0.002; +/- 3 months (n=796,531): 0.85 (0.73-0.98), p=0.028; +/- 4 months (n=1,066,872): 0.84 (0.73-0.97), p=0.023. Decreases observed following the 15 March measures were of smaller magnitude and not statistically significant. No changes were observed after 23 March. Preterm birth reductions after 9 March were consistent across gestational age TRANS strata and robust in sensitivity SERO analyses. They appeared confined to high-socioeconomic status neighbourhoods, but effect modification was not statistically significant. Conclusion In this national quasi-experimental study, initial implementation of COVID-19 mitigation measures was associated with a 15-23% drop in preterm births in the following months, in agreement with preliminary observations in other countries. It is now of pivotal importance that integration of comparable data from across the globe is undertaken to further substantiate these findings and start exploring the underlying mechanisms.

    Assessment of a Laboratory-Based SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Test Among Hemodialysis Patients: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    Authors: Dena E Cohen; Gilbert Marlowe; Gabriel Contreras; Marie Ann Sosa; Jair Munoz Mendoza; Oliver Lenz; Zain Mithani; Pura Margarita Teixeiro; Nery Queija; Araceli Moneda; Jean S Jeanty; Katherine Swanzy; Misha Palecek; Mahesh Krishnan; Jeffery Giullian; Steven M Brunelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20163642 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction: The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID -19) pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS -CoV -2) infection. Although tests to detect anti - SARS -CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been developed, their sensitivity SERO and specificity in hemodialysis patients have not been previously assessed. Methods: As part of a quality improvement (QI) initiative, nasopharyngeal swabs and predialysis blood SERO samples were collected on the same day from adult TRANS patients receiving routine hemodialysis care at clinics managed by a large dialysis organization in the greater Miami, Florida region (23 - 30 Apr 2020). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for SARS -CoV -2 and chemiluminescence immunoassays SERO for anti -SARS -CoV2 antibodies SERO were performed according to manufacturer-specified protocols. Results: Of 715 participants in the QI initiative, 38 had symptomatology consistent with COVID -19 prior to or during the initiative. Among these, COVID -19 was PCR -confirmed in 14 and ruled out in 20, with the remaining 4 being inconclusive. Among the 34 patients with known COVID -19 status, the sensitivity SERO and specificity of the antibody test SERO were 57.1% and 85.0% when either antibody SERO was considered. The remaining 677 patients had no record of symptoms consistent with COVID -19, nor any known exposure. Of these, 38 patients (5.6%) tested positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Conclusions: The operational characteristics of the laboratory-based antibody test SERO make it sufficient to rule in, but not rule out, SARS -CoV -2 infection in the appropriate clinical circumstance. A substantial proportion of dialysis patients may have had asymptomatic TRANS SARS -CoV -2 infection.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in Kenyan blood SERO donors

    Authors: Sophie Uyoga; Ifedayo M.O. Adetifa; Henry K. Karanja; James Nyagwange; James Tuju; Perpetual Wanjiku; Rashid Aman; Mercy Mwangangi; Patrick Amoth; Kadondi Kasera; Wangari Ng'ang'a; Charles Rombo; Christine K. Yegon; Khamisi Kithi; Elizabeth Odhiambo; Thomas Rotich; Irene Orgut; Sammy Kihara; Mark Otiende; Christian Bottomley; Zonia N. Mupe; Eunice W. Kagucia; Katherine Gallagher; Anthony Etyang; Shirine Voller; John Gitonga; Daisy Mugo; Charles N. Agoti; Edward Otieno; Leonard Ndwiga; Teresa Lambe; Daniel Wright; Edwine Barasa; Benjamin Tsofa; Philip Bejon; Lynette I. Ochola-Oyier; Ambrose Agweyu; J. Anthony G. Scott; George M Warimwe

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.27.20162693 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background There are no data on SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Africa though the COVID-19 epidemic curve and reported mortality differ from patterns seen elsewhere. We estimated the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO prevalence SERO among blood SERO donors in Kenya. Methods We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG prevalence SERO by ELISA SERO on residual blood SERO donor samples obtained between April 30 and June 16, 2020. Assay sensitivity SERO and specificity were 83% (95% CI 59, 96%) and 99.0% (95% CI 98.1, 99.5%), respectively. National seroprevalence SERO was estimated using Bayesian multilevel regression and post-stratification to account for non-random sampling with respect to age TRANS, sex and region, adjusted for assay performance SERO. Results Complete data were available for 3098 of 3174 donors, aged TRANS 15-64 years. By comparison with the Kenyan population, the sample over-represented males TRANS (82% versus 49%), adults TRANS aged TRANS 25-34 years (40% versus 27%) and residents of coastal Counties (49% versus 9%). Crude overall seroprevalence SERO was 5.6% (174/3098). Population-weighted, test-adjusted national seroprevalence SERO was 5.2% (95% CI 3.7, 7.1%). Seroprevalence SERO was highest in the 3 largest urban Counties; Mombasa (9.3% [95% CI 6.4, 13.2%)], Nairobi (8.5% [95% CI 4.9, 13.5%]) and Kisumu (6.5% [95% CI 3.3, 11.2%]). Conclusions We estimate that 1 in 20 adults TRANS in Kenya had SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO during the study period. By the median date of our survey, only 2093 COVID-19 cases and 71 deaths had been reported through the national screening system. This contrasts, by several orders of magnitude, with the numbers of cases and deaths MESHD reported in parts of Europe and America when seroprevalence SERO was similar.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO prevalence SERO in health care workers: Preliminary report of a single center study

    Authors: Michael Brant-Zawadzki; Deborah Fridman; Philip Robinson; Matthew Zahn; Randy German; Marcus Breit; Junko Hara

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.20.20158329 Date: 2020-07-25 Source: medRxiv

    SARS-CoV-2 has driven a pandemic crisis. Serological surveys have been conducted to establish prevalence SERO for covid-19 antibody SERO in various cohorts and communities. However, the prevalence SERO among healthcare workers is still being analyzed. The present study reports on initial sero-surveillance conducted on healthcare workers at a regional hospital system in Orange County, California, during May and June, 2020. Study participants were recruited from the entire hospital employee workforce and the independent medical staff. Data were collected for job title, location, covid-19 symptoms, a PCR test history, travel TRANS record since January 2020, and existence of household contacts TRANS with covid-19. A blood SERO sample was collected from each subject for serum SERO analysis for IgG antibodies SERO to SARS-CoV-2. Of 3,013 tested individuals, a total 2,932 were included in the analysis due to some missing data. Observed prevalence SERO of 1.06% (31 antibody SERO positive cases), adjusted prevalence SERO of 1.13% for test sensitivity SERO and specificity were identified. Significant group differences between positive vs. negative were observed for age TRANS (z = 2.65, p = .008), race (p = .037), presence of fever HP fever MESHD (p < .001) and loss of smell (p < .001). Possible explanation for this low prevalence SERO includes a relatively low local geographic community prevalence SERO (~4.4%) at the time of testing, the hospital's timely procurement of personal protective equipment, rigorous employee education MESHD, patient triage and treatment protocol development and implementation. In addition, possible greater presence of cross-reactive adaptive T cell mediated immunity in healthcare workers vs. the general population may have contributed. Determining antibody SERO prevalence SERO in front-line workers, and duration of antibody SERO presence may help stratify the workforce for risk, establish better health place policies and procedures, and potentially better mitigate transmission TRANS.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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