Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (9)

Anosmia (6)

Cough (4)

Falls (3)

Pneumonia (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 110
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    Cost-effective serological test SERO to determine exposure to SARS-CoV-2: ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein (Spike-RBDN318-V510) expressed in Escherichia coli

    Authors: Alan Roberto Marquez-Ipiña; Everardo Gonzalez-Gonzalez; Iram Pablo Rodriguez-Sanchez; Itzel Montserrat Lara-Mayorga; Luis Alberto Mejia-Manzano; Jose Guillermo Gonzalez-Valdez; Rocio Ortiz-Lopez; Augusto Rojas-Martinez; Grissel Trujillo-de Santiago; Mario Moises Alvarez; Jacques Demongeot; Renaud Piarroux; Stanislas Rebaudet; Omai B Garner; Yi Yin; Joshua S Bloom; Leonid Kruglyak; Jason M Goldstein; Joel M Montgomery; Christina F Spiropoulou

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20195503 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Massive worldwide serological testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 is needed to determine the extent of virus exposure in a particular region, the ratio of symptomatic to asymptomatic TRANS infected persons, and the duration and extent of immunity after infection MESHD. To achieve this aim, the development and production of reliable and cost-effective SARS-CoV-2 antigens is critical. Here, we report the bacterial production of the peptide S-RBDN318-V510, which contains the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We purified this peptide using a straightforward approach involving bacterial lysis, his-tag mediated affinity chromatography, and imidazole-assisted refolding. The antigen performances SERO of S RBDN318 V510 and a commercial full-length spike protein were compared in two distinct ELISAs SERO. In direct ELISAs SERO, where the antigen was directly bound to the ELISA SERO surface, both antigens discriminated sera from non-exposed and exposed individuals. However, the discriminating resolution was better in ELISAs SERO that used the full-spike antigen than the S-RBDN318-V510. Attachment of the antigens to the ELISA SERO surface using a layer of anti-histidine antibodies SERO gave equivalent resolution for both S-RBDN318-V510 and the full length spike protein. Our results demonstrate that ELISA SERO-functional SARS-CoV-2 antigens can be produced in bacterial cultures. S-RBDN318-V510 is amenable to massive production and may represent a cost-effective alternative to the use of structurally more complex antigens in serological COVID-19 testing.

    High-throughput quantitation of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in a single-dilution homogeneous assay

    Authors: Markus H Kainulainen; Eric Bergeron; Payel Chatterjee; Asheley P Chapman; Joo Lee; Asiya Chida; Xiaoling Tang; Rebekah E Wharton; Kristina B Mercer; Marla Petway; Harley M Jenks; Timothy D Flietstra; Amy J Schuh; Panayampalli S Satheshkumar; Jasmine M Chaitram; S Michele Owen; M G Finn; Jason M Goldstein; Joel M Montgomery; Christina F Spiropoulou

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195446 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019 and has since spread around the world, causing a pandemic of the respiratory disease COVID-19. Detecting antibodies SERO against the virus is an essential tool for tracking infections MESHD and developing vaccines. Such tests, primarily utilizing the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO) principle, can be either qualitative (reporting positive/negative results) or quantitative (reporting a value representing the quantity of specific antibodies SERO). Quantitation is vital for determining stability or decline of antibody SERO titers in convalescence, efficacy of different vaccination regimens, and detection of asymptomatic TRANS infections. Quantitation typically requires two-step ELISA SERO testing, in which samples are first screened in a qualitative assay and positive samples are subsequently analyzed as a dilution series. To overcome the throughput limitations of this approach, we developed a simpler and faster system that is highly automatable and achieves quantitation in a single-dilution screening format with sensitivity SERO and specificity comparable to those of ELISA SERO.

    Retrospective study of COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors at the onset of the outbreak before implementation of strict lockdown measures in France

    Authors: Nicolas Germain; Stephanie Herwegh; Anne Sophie Hatzfeld; Laurence Bocket; Brigitte Prevost; Pierre Marie Danze; Philippe Marchetti; Rachael Dodd; Brooke Nickel; Kristen Pickles; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Kirsten J McCaffery; Aboubacar Sidiki Magassouba; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.20192518 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has altered organ and tissue donations as well as transplantation practices. SARS-CoV-2 serological tests SERO could help in the selection of donors. We assessed COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO in a population of tissue donors, at the onset of the outbreak in France, before systematic screening of donors for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Methods: 235 tissue donors at the Lille Tissue bank between November 1, 2019 and March 16, 2020 were included. Archived serum SERO samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using two FDA-approved kits. Results: Most donors were at higher risks for severe COVID-19 illness including age TRANS over 65 years (142/235) and/or presence of co-morbidities (141/235). According to the COVID-19 risk assessment of transmission TRANS, 183 out of 235 tissue donors presented with a low risk level and 52 donors with an intermediate risk level of donor derived infection MESHD. Four out of the 235 (1.7%) tested specimens were positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO: 2 donors with anti-N protein IgG and 2 other donors with anti-S protein total Ig. None of them had both type of antibodies SERO. Conclusion: Regarding the seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors, we concluded that the transmission TRANS probability to recipient via tissue products was very low at the beginning of the outbreak.

    Antibody SERO Responses to SARS-CoV-2 in Coronavirus Diseases MESHD 2019 Patients with Different Severity

    Authors: Ekasit Kowitdamrong; Thanyawee Puthanakit; Watsamon Jantarabenjakul; Eakachai Prompetchara; Pintip Suchartlikitwong; Opass Putcharoen; Nattiya Hirankarn; Ke Lan; Yu Chen; Huabin Zhao

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.06.20189480 Date: 2020-09-08 Source: medRxiv

    Background: More understanding of antibody SERO responses in the SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD population is useful for vaccine development. Aim: To investigate SARS-CoV-2 IgA MESHD and IgG among COVID-19 Thai patients with different severity. Methods: We used plasma SERO from 118 adult TRANS patients who have confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 49 patients under investigation without infection MESHD, 20 patients with other respiratory infections MESHD, and 102 healthy controls. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO from Euroimmun. The optical density ratio cut off for positive test was 1.1 for IgA and 0.8 for IgG. The association of antibody SERO response with the severity of diseases and the day of symptoms was performed. Results: From Mar 10 to May 31, 2020, 289 participants were enrolled, and 384 samples were analyzed. Patients were categorized by clinical manifestations to mild (n=59), moderate (n=27) and severe (n=32). The overall sensitivity SERO of IgA and IgG from samples collected after day 7 is 87.9% (95% CI 79.8-93.6) and 84.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.3), respectively. The severe group had a significantly higher level of specific IgA and IgG to S1 antigen compared to the mild group. All moderate to severe patients have specific IgG while 20% of the mild group did not have any IgG detected after two weeks. Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 IgG level was significantly higher in males TRANS compared to females TRANS among the severe group (p=0.003). Conclusion: The serologic test SERO for SARS-CoV-2 has high sensitivity SERO after the second week after onset of illness. Serological response differs among patients with different severity and different sex.

    Clinical Performance SERO Evaluation of a SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO for Determining Past Exposure to SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Peter Findeisen; Hugo Stiegler; Eloisa Lopez-Calle; Tanja Schneider; Eva Urlaub; Johannes Hayer; Claudia Silke Zemmrich

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20180687 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: medRxiv

    The true prevalence SERO and population seropositivity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD remains unknown, due to the number of asymptomatic TRANS infections MESHD and limited access to high- performance SERO antibody tests SERO. To control the COVID-19 pandemic it is crucial to understand the true seroprevalence SERO, but not every region has access to extensive centralized PCR and serology testing. Currently available rapid antibody tests SERO lack the accuracy needed for recommendation by health authorities. To fill this gap, we analyzed and validated the clinical performance SERO of a new point-of-care SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody SERO Assay, a chromatographic immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of IgM/IgG antibodies SERO for use in near-patient settings. Analysis was performed using 42 Anti-SARS-Cov-2 positive (CoV+) and 92 Anti-SARS-Covid-2 negative (CoV-) leftover samples from before December 2019, using the Elecsys(R) Anti-SARS-CoV-2 as the reference assay. Analytical specificity was tested using leftover samples from individuals with symptoms of common cold collected before December 2019. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO was 100.0% (95% CI 91.59-100.00) sensitive and 96.74% (95% CI 90.77-99.32) specific with an assay failure rate of 0.00%. No cross-reactivity was observed against the common cold panel. Method comparison was additionally conducted by two external laboratories, using 100 CoV+/275 CoV- samples, also comparing whole blood SERO versus plasma SERO matrix. The comparison demonstrated for plasma SERO 96.00% positive/96.36% negative percent agreement with the Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and overall 99.20% percent agreement between whole blood SERO and EDTA plasma SERO. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO demonstrated similar clinical performance SERO to the manufacturer's data and to a centralized automated immunoassay SERO, with no cross-reactivity to common cold panels.

    Development and validation of a multiplex bead based assay for the detection of antibodies SERO directed against SARS-CoV-2 proteins

    Authors: Robert A Bray; Jar-How Lee; Peter Brescia; Deepali Kumar; Thoa Nong; Remi Shih; E Steve Woodle; Jonathan S Maltzman; Howard M Gebel; Paula Hartman; Jenny Park; Maher Alayyoubi; Hari Bhaskaran; Adrian Dukanovic; Belle Bao; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.02.20185199 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Transplant recipients who develop COVID-19 may be at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Determining antibody SERO status against SARS-CoV-2 in candidates and recipients will be important to understand the epidemiology and clinical course of COVID-19 infection MESHD in this population. There are multiple antibody tests SERO to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO, but their performance SERO varies according to their platforms and the antigenic targets, making interpretation of the results challenging. Additionally, currently available serological tests SERO do not exclude the possibility that positive responses are due to cross reactive antibodies SERO to community coronaviruses. This study describes the development and validation of a high throughput multiplex bead based antibody SERO detection assay with the capacity to identify, simultaneously, patient responses to five distinct SARS-CoV-2 proteins. The antibody SERO response to these proteins are SARS-CoV-2 specific as antibodies SERO against four community coronaviruses do not cross-react. Assay configuration is essentially identical to the single antigen bead assays used in the majority of histocompatibility laboratories around the world and could easily be implemented into routine screening of transplant candidates and recipients. This new assay provides a novel tool to interrogate the spectrum of immune responses to SAR TRANS-CoV-2 and is uniquely suitable for use in the transplant setting.

    Rapid 'mix and read' assay for scalable detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in patient plasma SERO

    Authors: Hong Yue; Radosław P Nowak; Daan Overwijn; N Connor Payne; Stephanie Fischinger; Caroline Atyeo; Lindsey R Baden; Eric James Nilles; Elizabeth W Karlson; Xu G Yu; Jonathan Z Li; Galit Alter; Ralph Mazitschek; Eric S Fischer; Caroline Marshall; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20184101 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    The human beta coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, causative virus of COVID-19, has infected more than 15 million people globally and continues to spread. Widespread, population level testing to detect active and past infections is critical to curb the COVID-19 pandemic. Antibody SERO ( serological) testing SERO is the only option for detecting past infections outside the narrow window accessible to nucleic acid-based tests. However, currently available serological assays SERO commonly lack scalability. Here, we describe the development of a rapid homogenous serological assay SERO for the detection of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in patient plasma SERO. We show that the fluorescence-based assay accurately detects seroconversion in COVID-19 patients from less than 1 microliter of plasma SERO. Using a cohort of samples from COVID-19 infected MESHD or healthy individuals, we demonstrate detection with 100% sensitivity SERO and specificity. This assay addresses an important need for a robust, low barrier to implementation, and scalable serological assay SERO with complementary strengths to currently available serological platforms.

    Development of SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid Specific Monoclonal Antibodies SERO

    Authors: James S Terry; Loran BR Anderson; Michael S Scherman; Carley E McAlister; Rushika Perera; Tony Schountz; Brian J Geiss

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.03.280370 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: bioRxiv

    The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive disruptions in every society around the world. To help fight COVID-19, new molecular tools specifically targeting critical components of the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), are desperately needed. The SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein is a major component of the viral replication processes, integral to viral particle assembly, and is a major diagnostic marker for infection MESHD and immune protection. Currently available antibody SERO reagents targeting the nucleocapsid protein were primarily developed against the related SARS-CoV virus MESHD and are not specific to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein. Therefore, in this work we developed and characterized a series of new mouse monoclonal antibodies SERO against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein. The anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies were tested SERO in ELISA SERO, western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. The variable regions from the heavy and light chains from five select clones were cloned and sequenced, and preliminary epitope mapping of the sequenced clones was performed. Overall, the new antibody SERO reagents described here will be of significant value in the fight against COVID-19.

    Insights into the practical effectiveness of RT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 from serologic data, a cohort study

    Authors: Zhen Zhang; Qifang Bi; Shisong Fang; Lan Wei; Xin Wang; Jianfan He; Yongsheng Wu; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20182469 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Virologic detection of SARS-CoV-2 through Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) has limitations for surveillance. Serologic tests SERO can be an important complementary approach. Objective: Assess the practical performance SERO of RT-PCR based surveillance protocols, and the extent of undetected SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS in Shenzhen, China. Design: Cohort study nested in a public health response. Setting: Shenzhen, China; January-May 2020. Participants: 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS of confirmed COVID-19 cases and 400 residents without known exposure (main analysis). Fifty-seven PCR-positive case contacts (timing analysis). Measurements: Virological testing by RT-PCR. Measurement of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in PCR-negative contacts 2-15 weeks after initial testing using total Ab ELISA SERO. Rates of undetected infection MESHD, performance SERO of RT-PCR over the course of infection MESHD, and characteristics of seropositive but PCR-negative individuals were assessed. Results: The adjusted seropositivity rate for total Ab among 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS was 4.1% (95%CI, 2.9% to 5.7%), significantly higher than among residents without known exposure to cases (0.0%, 95%CI, 0.0% to 1.0%). PCR-positive cases were 8.0 times (RR; 95% CI, 5.3 to 12.7) more likely to report symptoms than the PCR-negative individuals who were seropositive, but otherwise similar. RT-PCR missed 36% (95%CI, 28% to 44%) of infected close-contacts TRANS, and false negative rates appear to be highly dependent on stage of infection MESHD. Limitations: No serological data were available on PCR-positive cases. Sample size was limited, and only 20% of PCR-negative contacts met inclusion criteria. Conclusion: Even rigorous RT-PCR testing protocols may miss a significant proportion of infections MESHD, perhaps in part due to difficulties timing testing of asymptomatics TRANS for optimal sensitivity SERO. Surveillance and control protocols relying on RT-PCR were, nevertheless, able to contain community spread in Shenzhen.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J Abu-Raddad; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184705 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Methods: An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions. Results: The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak. Conclusions: Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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