Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 160
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    Seroprevalence SERO of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in ophthalmic patients

    Authors: shengjie li Sr.; yichao qiu; li tang; zhujian wang; wenjun cao; gezhi xu; xinghuai sun; Philippa C Matthews; Jienchi Dorward; Bernhard Graf; Florian Hitzenbichler; Frank Hanses; Hendrik Poeck; Marina Kreutz; Evelyn Orso; Ralph Burkhardt; Tanja Niedermair; Christoph Brochhausen; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Matthias Mack; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.22.20198465 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Using serological test SERO to estimate the prevalence SERO and infection potential of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 in ocular diseases MESHD patients help understand the relationship between ocular diseases MESHD and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD. We conducted a cross-sectional study assaying the IgG and IgM antibodies SERO in 1331 individuals with ocular diseases MESHD by using a magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay SERO kit, during the period from February 2020 to May 2020. In our study, the seroposivity in total ocular disease MESHD patients was 0.83% (11/1331). The patients with different ocular diseases MESHD including xerophthalmia MESHD, keratitis HP keratitis MESHD, conjunctival cyst, cataract HP cataract MESHD, glaucoma HP glaucoma MESHD, refractive error, strabismus HP and others had seroposivity of 2.94%, 12.5%, 25%, 4.41%, 2.63%, 1.6%, 2.22% and 0%, respectively. Among that, two ocular surface disease groups ( keratitis HP keratitis MESHD and conjunctival cyst) had higher seroprevalence SERO compared with others. All the participants were reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction negative for SARS-CoV-2 from throat swabs. Our study evaluated the seroprevalence SERO in patients with different ocular diseases MESHD, which will help us understand the relationship between ocular disease MESHD and SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Furthermore, the serological test SERO for the presence of IgM and/or IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 might provide accurate estimate of the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in patients with ocular diseases MESHD.

    SARS-CoV-2 antigen and antibody SERO prevalence SERO among UK staff working with cancer MESHD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Authors: David M Favara; Karen McAdam; Anthony Cooke; Alex Bordessa-Kelly; Ieva Budriunaite; Sophie Bossingham; Sally Houghton; Rainer Doffinger; Nicola Ainsworth; Pippa Corrie; Yimin Tong; Jin Zhong; Youhua Xie; Xinquan Wang; Zhenghong Yuan; Dongming Zhou; Rong Zhang; Qiang Ding; Kristen J Brennand; Katherine H Hullsiek; David R Boulware; SARAH M LOFGREN; Martirene A da Silva; Brian Custer; Manoel Barral-Netto; Moritz Kraemer; Rafael HM Pererira; Oliver G Pybus; Michael P Busch; Márcia C Castro; Christopher Dye; Vitor H Nascimento; Nuno R Faria; Ester C Sabino

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20197590 Date: 2020-09-20 Source: medRxiv

    Background International guidelines for testing potentially immunosuppressed cancer MESHD patients receiving non-surgical anticancer therapies for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) are currently lacking. The value of routinely testing staff treating cancer MESHD patients is not known. Methods: Patient-facing oncology department staff at work during the COVID-19 pandemic consented to have a nasopharyngeal swab SARS-CoV-2 antigen test by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood SERO tests for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO using a laboratory Luminex-based assay and a rapid point-of-care (POC) assay on 2 occasions 28 days apart in June and July 2020. Results 434 participants were recruited: nurses (58.3%), doctors (21.2%), radiographers (10.4%) and administrators (10.1%). 82% were female TRANS; median age TRANS 40-years (range 19-66). 26.3% reported prior symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 1.4% tested PCR-positive prior to June 2020. All were PCR-negative at both study day 1 and 28. 18.4% were SARS-CoV-2 sero-positive on day 1 by Luminex, of whom 42.5% also tested positive by POC. 47.5% of Luminex sero-positives had antibodies SERO to both nucleocapsid (N) and surface (S) antigens. Nurses (21.3%) and doctors (17.4%) had higher prevalence SERO trends of Luminex sero-positivity compared with administrators (13.6%) and radiographers (8.9%) (p=0.2). 38% of sero-positive participants reported previous symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, a 1.9-fold higher odds than sero-negative participants (p=0.01). 400 participants re-tested on day 28: 13.3% were Luminex sero-positive of whom 92.5% were previously positive and 7.5% newly positive. Nurses (16.5%) had the highest seroprevalence SERO trend amongst staff groups (p=0.07). 32.5% of day 1 sero-positives became sero-negative by day 28: the majority being previously reactive to the N-antigen only (p<0.0001). Conclusion The high prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 IgG sero-positivity in oncology nurses, and the high decline of positivity over 4 weeks supports regular antigen and antibody testing SERO in this staff group for SARS-CoV-2 as part of routine patient care prior to availability of a vaccine.

    An ELISA SERO protocol with resolution at high sample concentration reveals reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in unexposed individuals

    Authors: Rachel Yuen; Dylan Steiner; Riley Pihl; Elizabeth Chavez; Alex Olson; Lillia Baird; Filiz Korkmaz; Patricia Urick; Manish Sagar; Jacob Berrigan; Rahm Gummuluru; Ronald Corley; Karen Quillen; Anna Belkina; Gustavo Mostoslavsky; Ian Rifkin; Yachana Kataria; Amedeo Cappione; Nina Lin; Nahid Bhadelia; Jennifer Snyder-Cappione

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20192765 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted work, economy, and way of life. The SARS-CoV-2 virus displays unique features including widely varying symptoms and outcomes between infected individuals. Sensitive measurement of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies SERO would provide new insight into virus transmission TRANS dynamics, pre-existing cross-reactive immunity, and the nuances of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. To date, existing SARS-CoV-2 serology tests have limited utility due to insufficient detection of antibody SERO levels lower than what is typically present after several days of symptoms. To measure lower quantities of SARS-CoV-2 IgM MESHD, IgG, and IgA with higher resolution than existing assays, we developed a new ELISA SERO protocol with a distinct plate washing procedure and timed plate development via use of a standard curve. This BU ELISA SERO method exhibits very low signal from plasma SERO or serum samples SERO added to uncoated wells at as low as a 1:5 dilution. Use of this method revealed circulating SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) reactive antibodies SERO from blood SERO samples drawn prior to May 2019. Of our pre-pandemic cohort, no SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive IgG antibodies SERO were detected in subjects over 70 years of age TRANS, and SARS-CoV-2 NP-reactive antibodies SERO were present at similar levels to infected subjects in some individuals and very low in others. Also, samples drawn in May 2020 from two individuals with no symptoms or no known virus exposure contained SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive antibodies SERO at intermediate amounts compared with other subject groups (higher than pre-pandemic and lower than confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD). The one asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 convalescent subject in our study possessed comparable amounts of SARS-CoV-2 NP-specific IgM and IgG but drastically lower IgA than the symptomatic counterparts. Also, our assay detected positive signal from samples that gave negative results in a commercially available Lateral Flow Device (LFD) and the EUA approved Abbott IgG chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO detection. We propose that this improved ELISA SERO protocol, which is straightforward to perform, low cost, and uses readily available commercial reagents, is a useful tool to elucidate new information about SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and has promising implications for improved detection of all analytes measurable by this platform.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 among adults TRANS in three regions of France following the lockdown and associated risk factors: a multicohort study.

    Authors: Fabrice Carrat; Xavier de Lamballerie; Delphine Rahib; Helene Blanche; Nathanael Lapidus; Fanny Artaud; Sofiane Kab; Adeline Renuy; Fabien Szabo de Edelenyi; Laurence Meyer; Nathalie Lydie; Marie-Aline Charles; Pierre-Yves Ancel; Florence Jusot; Alexandra Rouquette; Stephane Priet; Paola M Saba Villaroel; Toscane Fourie; Clovis Lusivika-Nzinga; Jerome Nicol; Stephane Legot; Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo; Younes Essedik; Cindy Lai; Jean-Marie Gagliolo; Jean-Francois Deleuze; Nathalie Bajos; Gianluca Severi; Mathilde Touvier; Marie Zins

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195693 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Aim To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in May-June 2020 after the lockdown in adults TRANS living in three regions in France and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods Participants in a survey on COVID-19 from an existing consortium of three general adult TRANS population cohorts living in the Ile-de-France (IDF) or Grand Est (GE), two regions with high rate of COVID-19, or in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine (NA), with a low rate, were asked to take a dried- blood SERO spot (DBS) for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO assessment. The primary outcome was a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG SERO result against the spike protein of the virus ( ELISA SERO-S). The secondary outcomes were a positive ELISA IgG SERO against the nucleocapsid protein ( ELISA SERO-NP), anti- SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO titers >=40 (SN), and predicted positivity obtained from a multiple imputation model ( MI MESHD). Prevalence SERO estimates were adjusted using sampling weights and post-stratification methods. Findings Between May 4, 2020 and June 23, 2020, 16,000 participants were asked to provide DBS, and 14,628 were included in the analysis, 983 with a positive ELISA SERO-S, 511 with a positive ELISA SERO-NP, 424 with SN>=40 and 941 (Standard Deviation=31) with a positive MI MESHD. Adjusted estimates of seroprevalence SERO (positive ELISA SERO-S) were 10.0% (95%CI 9.1%;10.9%) in IDF, 9.0% (95%CI 7.7%; 10.2%) in GE and 3.1% (95%CI 2.4%; 3.7%), in NA. The adjusted prevalence SERO of positive ELISA SERO-NP, SN and MI MESHD were 5.7%, 5.0% and 10.0% in IDF, 6.0%, 4.3% and 8.6% in GE, and 0.6%, 1.3% and 2.5% in NA, respectively. A higher seroprevalence SERO was observed in younger participants and when at least one child TRANS or adolescent lived in the same household. A lower seroprevalence SERO was observed in smokers compared to non-smokers. Interpretation At the end of the lockdown the prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG or neutralizing antibodies SERO remained low in the French adult TRANS population, even in regions with high reported rates of COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in Tbilisi, the capital city of country of Georgia

    Authors: Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Lana Gatserelia; Marine Mirziashvili; Natia Dvali; Akaki Abutidze; Revaz Metchurtchlishvili; Carlos del Rio; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Alic Peuker; Gabriele Schoenhammer; Johanna Raithel; Dirk Lunz; Bernhard Graf; Florian Geismann; Matthias Lubnow; Matthias Mack; Peter Hau; Christopher Bohr; Ralph Burkhardt; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Frank Hanses; Florian Hitzenbichler; Daniel Heudobler; Florian Lueke; Tobias Pukrop; Wolfgang Herr; Daniel Wolff; Hendrik Poeck; Christoph Brochhausen; Petra Hoffmann; Michael Rehli; Marina Kreutz; Kathrin Renner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20195024 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Georgia timely implemented effective response measures, with testing, contact tracing TRANS and isolation being the main pillar of the national response, achieving the lowest cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the European region. Methods: We conducted a survey to estimate SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO among adult TRANS residents of capital city of Tbilisi ( adult TRANS population: 859,328). Participants were recruited through respondent driven sampling during May 18-27, 2020. Blood SERO specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO using commercially available lateral flow immunoassay SERO (COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette, Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech). Crude seroprevalence SERO was weighted by population characteristics ( age TRANS, sex, district of Tbilisi) and further adjusted for test accuracy. Results: Among 1,068 adults TRANS recruited 963 (90.2%) were between 18 and 64 years-old, 682 (63.9%) women. 176 (16.5%) reported symptoms indicative of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD occurring in previous three months. Nine persons tested positive for IgG: crude seroprevalence SERO: 0.84%, (95% CI: 0.33%-1.59%), weighted seroprevalence SERO: 0.94% (95% CI: 0.37%-1.95%), weighted and adjusted for test accuracy: 1.02% (95% CI: 0.38%-2.18%). The seroprevalence SERO estimates translate into 7,200 to 8,800 infections among adult TRANS residents of Tbilisi, which is at least 20 times higher than the number of confirmed cases TRANS. Conclusions: Low seroprevalence SERO confirms that Georgia successfully contained spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of pandemic. Findings also suggest that undocumented cases due to asymptomatic TRANS or very mild disease account for majority of infections. Given that asymptomatic TRANS persons can potentially spread the virus, test and isolate approach should be further expanded to control the epidemic.

    Early Release Estimates for SARS-CoV-2 Prevalence SERO and Antibody SERO Response Interim Weighting for Probability-Based Sample Surveys

    Authors: Heather Bradley; Mansour Fahimi; Travis Sanchez; Ben Lopman; Martin Frankel; Colleen Kelley; Richard Rothenberg; Aaron J Siegler; Patrick S Sullivan; Md. Nur Islam; Newaz Mohammed Bahadur; Md. Didar ul Alam; Hasan Mahmud Reza; Md. Jakariya

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20195099 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Many months into the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, basic epidemiologic parameters describing burden of disease are lacking. To reduce selection bias in current burden of disease estimates derived from diagnostic testing data or serologic testing SERO in convenience samples, we are conducting a national probability-based sample SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey. Sampling from a national address-based frame and using mailed recruitment materials and test kits will allow us to estimate national prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and antibodies SERO, overall and by demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics. Data will be weighted for unequal selection probabilities and non-response and will be adjusted to population benchmarks. Due to the urgent need for these estimates, expedited interim weighting of serosurvey responses will be undertaken to produce early release estimates, which will be published on the study website, COVIDVu.org. Here, we describe a process for computing interim survey weights and guidelines for release of interim estimates.

    COVID-19 and human milk: SARS-CoV-2, antibodies, and neutralizing SERO capacity

    Authors: Ryan M Pace; Janet E Williams; Kirsi M Järvinen; Mandy B Belfort; Christina DW Pace; Kimberly A Lackey; Alexandra C Gogel; Phuong Nguyen-Contant; Preshetha Kanagaiah; Theresa Fitzgerald; Rita Ferri; Bridget Young; Casey Rosen-Carole; Nichole Diaz; Courtney Meehan; Beatrice Caffe; Mark Y Sangster; David J Topham; Mark A McGuire; Antti Seppo; Michelle K McGuire; Margaret E Ackerman; Lisa M Schilling; Vignesh Subbian; David Vizcaya; Lin Zhang; Ying Zhang; Hong Zhu; Li Liu; Peter Rijnbeek; George Hripcsak; Jennifer C.E Lane; Edward Burn; Christian Reich; Marc A Suchard; Talita Duarte-Salles; Krisitn Kosta; Patrick B Ryan; DANIEL PRIETO-ALHAMBRA; Christoph Lange; Georg Laue; Clemes Lier; Matthias Lindner; Georgios Marinos; Robert Markewitz; Jacob Nattermann; Rainer Noth; Peter Pickkers; Klaus F. Rabe; Alina Renz; Christoph Roecken; Jan Rupp; Annika Schaffarzyk; Alexander Scheffold; Jonas Schulte-Schrepping; Domagoj Schunck; Dirk Skowasch; Thomas Ulas; Klaus-Peter Wandinger; Michael Wittig; Johannes Zimmermann; Hauke Busch; Bimba F. Hoyer; Christoph Kaleta; Jan Heyckendorf; Matthijs Kox; Jan Rybniker; Stefan Schreiber; Joachim Schultze; Philip Rosenstiel; - HCA Lung Biological Network; - Deutsche COVID-19 Omics Initiative (DeCOI)

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20196071 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: It is not known whether SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted from mother to infant during breastfeeding, and if so whether the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk. This study was designed to evaluate 1) if SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected in milk and on the breast of infected MESHD women, 2) concentrations of milk-borne anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, and 3) the capacity of milk to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 infectivity MESHD. Methods: We collected 37 milk samples and 70 breast swabs (before and after breast washing) from 18 women recently diagnosed with COVID-19. Samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-qPCR. Milk was also analyzed for IgA and IgG specific for the nucleocapsid protein, receptor binding domain (RBD), S2 subunit of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, as well as 2 seasonal coronaviruses using ELISA SERO; and for its ability to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Results: We did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in any milk sample. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected on several breast swabs, although only one was considered conclusive. All milk contained SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA and IgG, and levels of anti-RBD IgA correlated with SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Strong correlations between levels of IgA and IgG to SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal coronaviruses were noted. Conclusions: Our data do not support maternal-to- child TRANS transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 via milk; however, risk of transmission TRANS via breast skin MESHD should be further evaluated. Importantly, milk produced by infected mothers is a source of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 activity. These results support recommendations to continue breastfeeding during mild-to-moderate maternal COVID-19 illness.

    Distinct SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Reactivity Patterns in Coronavirus Convalescent Plasma SERO Revealed by a Coronavirus Antigen Microarray

    Authors: Rafael Ramiro de Assis; Aarti Jain; Rie Nakajima; Algis Jasinskas; Saahir Khan; Larry J Dumont; Kathleen Kelly; Graham Simmons; Mars Stone; Clara Di Germanio; Michael P Busch; Philip L Felgner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.300871 Date: 2020-09-17 Source: bioRxiv

    A coronavirus antigen microarray (COVAM) was constructed containing 11 SARS-CoV-2, 5 SARS-1, 5 MERS, and 12 seasonal coronavirus recombinant proteins. The array is designed to measure immunoglobulin isotype and subtype levels in serum SERO or plasma SERO samples against each of the individual antigens printed on the array. We probed the COVAM with COVID-19 convalescent plasma SERO (CCP) collected from 99 donors who recovered from a PCR+ confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. The results were analyzed using two computational approaches, a generalized linear model (glm) and Random Forest (RF) prediction model, to classify individual specimens as either Reactive or Non-Reactive against the SARS-CoV-2 antigens. A training set of 88 pre-COVID-19 specimens (PreCoV) collected in August 2019 and 102 positive specimens from SARS-CoV-2 PCR+ confirmed COVID-19 cases was used for these analyses. Results compared with an FDA emergency use authorized (EUA) SARS-CoV2 S1-based total Ig chemiluminescence immunoassay SERO (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics VITROS Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total, CoV2T) and with a SARS-CoV-2 S1-S2 spike-based pseudovirus micro neutralization assay (SARS-CoV-2 reporter viral particle neutralization titration (RVPNT) showed high concordance between the 3 assays. Three CCP specimens that were negative by the VITROS CoV2T immunoassay SERO were also negative by both COVAM and the RVPNT assay. Concordance between VITROS CoV2T and COVAM was 96%, VITROS CoV2T and RVPNT 93%, and RVPNT and COVAM 95%. The discordances were all weakly reactive samples near the cutoff threshold of the VITROS CoV2T immunoassay SERO. The multiplex COVAM allows CCP to be grouped according to antibody SERO reactivity patterns against 11 SARS-CoV-2 antigens. Unsupervised K-means analysis, via the gap statistics, as well as hierarchical clustering analysis revealed 3 main clusters with distinct reactivity intensities and patterns. These patterns were not recapitulated by adjusting the VITROS CoV2T or RVPNT assay thresholds. Plasma SERO classified according to these reactivity patterns may be better associated with CCP treatment efficacy than antibody SERO levels alone. The use of a SARS-CoV-2 antigen array may be useful to qualify CCP for administration as a treatment for acute COVID-19 and to interrogate vaccine immunogenicity and performance SERO in preclinical and clinical studies to understand and recapitulate antibody SERO responses associated with protection from infection and disease.

    Structural and Functional Comparison of SARS-CoV-2-Spike Receptor Binding Domain Produced in Pichia pastoris and Mammalian Cells

    Authors: - Argentinian AntiCovid Consortium; Claudia R. Arbeitman; Gabriela Auge; Matias Blaustein; Luis Bredeston; Enrique S. Corapi; Patricio O. Craig; Leandro A. Cossio; Liliana Dain; Fernanda Elias; Natalia B. Fernandez; Javier Gasulla; Natalia Gorojovsky; Gustavo E. Gudesblat; Maria G. Herrera; Lorena I. Ibañez; Tommy Idrovo; Matias Iglesias Rando; Laura Kamenetzky; Alejandro D Nadra; Diego G. Noseda; Carlos H. Pavan; Maria F. Pavan; Maria F. Pignataro; Ernesto Roman; Lucas A.M Ruberto; Natalia Rubinstein; Javier Santos; Francisco Velazquez; Alicia M. Zelada; Catherine M.K. Ho; Chelsea L Kennard; Daniel Knott; Stephanie Leung; Vanessa Lucas; Adam Mabbutt; Alexandra L Morrison; Didier Ngabo; Jemma Paterson; Elizabeth J Penn; Steve Pullan; Irene Taylor; Tom Tipton; Stephen Thomas; Julia A Tree; Carrie Turner; Nadina Wand; Nathan R Wiblin; Sue Charlton; Bassam Hallis; Geoffrey Pearson; Emma L Rayner; Andrew G Nicholson; Simon G Funnell; Mike J Dennis; Fergus V Gleeson; Sally Sharpe; Miles W Carroll

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.17.300335 Date: 2020-09-17 Source: bioRxiv

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a cost-effective and easily scalable system for recombinant protein production. In this work we compared the conformation of the receptor binding domain (RBD) from SARS-CoV-2 Spike MESHD protein expressed in P. pastoris and in the well established HEK-293T mammalian cell system. RBD obtained from both yeast and mammalian cells was properly folded, as indicated by UV-absorption, circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence. They also had similar stability, as indicated by temperature-induced unfolding (observed Tm were 50 {degrees}C and 52 {degrees}C for RBD produced in P. pastoris and HEK-293T cells, respectively). Moreover, the stability of both variants was similarly reduced when the ionic strength was increased, in agreement with a computational analysis predicting that a set of ionic interactions may stabilize RBD structure. Further characterization by HPLC, size-exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed a higher heterogeneity of RBD expressed in P. pastoris relative to that produced in HEK-293T cells, which disappeared after enzymatic removal of glycans. The production of RBD in P. pastoris was scaled-up in a bioreactor, with yields above 45 mg/L of 90% pure protein, thus potentially allowing large scale immunizations to produce neutralizing antibodies SERO, as well as the large scale production of serological tests SERO for SARS-CoV-2.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies SERO Among 925 Staff Members in an Urban Hospital Accepting COVID-19 Patients in Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Authors: Tsutomu Nishida; Hiromi Iwahashi; Kazuhiro Yamauchi; Noriko Kinoshita; Yukiyoshi Okauchi; Norihiro Suzuki; Masami Inada; Kinya Abe; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20191866 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD rate in hospitals during the pandemic remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of our hospital's current nosocomial infection control, we conducted a serological survey of the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO (immunoglobulin G) among the staff of our hospital, which is treating coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G in the participants using a laboratory-based quantitative test (Abbott immunoassay SERO), which has a sensitivity SERO and specificity of 100% and 99.6%, respectively. To investigate the factors associated with seropositivity, we also obtained some information from the participants with an anonymous questionnaire. Results: We invited 1133 staff members in our hospital, and 925 (82%) participated. The mean age TRANS of the participants was 40.0{+/-}11.8 years, and most were women (80.0%). According to job title, there were 149 medical doctors or dentists (16.0%), 489 nurses (52.9%), 140 medical technologists (14.2%), 49 healthcare providers (5.3%), and 98 administrative staff (10.5%). The overall prevalence SERO of seropositivity for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG was 0.43% (4/925), which was similar to the control seroprevalence SERO of 0.54% (16/2970)) in the general population in Osaka during the same period according to a government survey conducted with the same assay. Seropositive rates did not significantly differ according to job title, exposure to suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, or any other investigated factors. Conclusion: The subclinical SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rate in our hospital was not higher than that in the general population under our nosocomial infection MESHD control measures.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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