Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (7)

Cough (4)

Falls (3)

Anosmia (3)

Shock (2)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 82
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    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 among adults TRANS in three regions of France following the lockdown and associated risk factors: a multicohort study.

    Authors: Fabrice Carrat; Xavier de Lamballerie; Delphine Rahib; Helene Blanche; Nathanael Lapidus; Fanny Artaud; Sofiane Kab; Adeline Renuy; Fabien Szabo de Edelenyi; Laurence Meyer; Nathalie Lydie; Marie-Aline Charles; Pierre-Yves Ancel; Florence Jusot; Alexandra Rouquette; Stephane Priet; Paola M Saba Villaroel; Toscane Fourie; Clovis Lusivika-Nzinga; Jerome Nicol; Stephane Legot; Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo; Younes Essedik; Cindy Lai; Jean-Marie Gagliolo; Jean-Francois Deleuze; Nathalie Bajos; Gianluca Severi; Mathilde Touvier; Marie Zins

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195693 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Aim To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in May-June 2020 after the lockdown in adults TRANS living in three regions in France and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods Participants in a survey on COVID-19 from an existing consortium of three general adult TRANS population cohorts living in the Ile-de-France (IDF) or Grand Est (GE), two regions with high rate of COVID-19, or in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine (NA), with a low rate, were asked to take a dried- blood SERO spot (DBS) for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO assessment. The primary outcome was a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG SERO result against the spike protein of the virus ( ELISA SERO-S). The secondary outcomes were a positive ELISA IgG SERO against the nucleocapsid protein ( ELISA SERO-NP), anti- SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO titers >=40 (SN), and predicted positivity obtained from a multiple imputation model ( MI MESHD). Prevalence SERO estimates were adjusted using sampling weights and post-stratification methods. Findings Between May 4, 2020 and June 23, 2020, 16,000 participants were asked to provide DBS, and 14,628 were included in the analysis, 983 with a positive ELISA SERO-S, 511 with a positive ELISA SERO-NP, 424 with SN>=40 and 941 (Standard Deviation=31) with a positive MI MESHD. Adjusted estimates of seroprevalence SERO (positive ELISA SERO-S) were 10.0% (95%CI 9.1%;10.9%) in IDF, 9.0% (95%CI 7.7%; 10.2%) in GE and 3.1% (95%CI 2.4%; 3.7%), in NA. The adjusted prevalence SERO of positive ELISA SERO-NP, SN and MI MESHD were 5.7%, 5.0% and 10.0% in IDF, 6.0%, 4.3% and 8.6% in GE, and 0.6%, 1.3% and 2.5% in NA, respectively. A higher seroprevalence SERO was observed in younger participants and when at least one child TRANS or adolescent lived in the same household. A lower seroprevalence SERO was observed in smokers compared to non-smokers. Interpretation At the end of the lockdown the prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG or neutralizing antibodies SERO remained low in the French adult TRANS population, even in regions with high reported rates of COVID-19.

    An ELISA SERO protocol with resolution at high sample concentration reveals reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in unexposed individuals

    Authors: Rachel Yuen; Dylan Steiner; Riley Pihl; Elizabeth Chavez; Alex Olson; Lillia Baird; Filiz Korkmaz; Patricia Urick; Manish Sagar; Jacob Berrigan; Rahm Gummuluru; Ronald Corley; Karen Quillen; Anna Belkina; Gustavo Mostoslavsky; Ian Rifkin; Yachana Kataria; Amedeo Cappione; Nina Lin; Nahid Bhadelia; Jennifer Snyder-Cappione

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20192765 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted work, economy, and way of life. The SARS-CoV-2 virus displays unique features including widely varying symptoms and outcomes between infected individuals. Sensitive measurement of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies SERO would provide new insight into virus transmission TRANS dynamics, pre-existing cross-reactive immunity, and the nuances of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. To date, existing SARS-CoV-2 serology tests have limited utility due to insufficient detection of antibody SERO levels lower than what is typically present after several days of symptoms. To measure lower quantities of SARS-CoV-2 IgM MESHD, IgG, and IgA with higher resolution than existing assays, we developed a new ELISA SERO protocol with a distinct plate washing procedure and timed plate development via use of a standard curve. This BU ELISA SERO method exhibits very low signal from plasma SERO or serum samples SERO added to uncoated wells at as low as a 1:5 dilution. Use of this method revealed circulating SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) reactive antibodies SERO from blood SERO samples drawn prior to May 2019. Of our pre-pandemic cohort, no SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive IgG antibodies SERO were detected in subjects over 70 years of age TRANS, and SARS-CoV-2 NP-reactive antibodies SERO were present at similar levels to infected subjects in some individuals and very low in others. Also, samples drawn in May 2020 from two individuals with no symptoms or no known virus exposure contained SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive antibodies SERO at intermediate amounts compared with other subject groups (higher than pre-pandemic and lower than confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD). The one asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 convalescent subject in our study possessed comparable amounts of SARS-CoV-2 NP-specific IgM and IgG but drastically lower IgA than the symptomatic counterparts. Also, our assay detected positive signal from samples that gave negative results in a commercially available Lateral Flow Device (LFD) and the EUA approved Abbott IgG chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO detection. We propose that this improved ELISA SERO protocol, which is straightforward to perform, low cost, and uses readily available commercial reagents, is a useful tool to elucidate new information about SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and has promising implications for improved detection of all analytes measurable by this platform.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in Tbilisi, the capital city of country of Georgia

    Authors: Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Lana Gatserelia; Marine Mirziashvili; Natia Dvali; Akaki Abutidze; Revaz Metchurtchlishvili; Carlos del Rio; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Alic Peuker; Gabriele Schoenhammer; Johanna Raithel; Dirk Lunz; Bernhard Graf; Florian Geismann; Matthias Lubnow; Matthias Mack; Peter Hau; Christopher Bohr; Ralph Burkhardt; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Frank Hanses; Florian Hitzenbichler; Daniel Heudobler; Florian Lueke; Tobias Pukrop; Wolfgang Herr; Daniel Wolff; Hendrik Poeck; Christoph Brochhausen; Petra Hoffmann; Michael Rehli; Marina Kreutz; Kathrin Renner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20195024 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Georgia timely implemented effective response measures, with testing, contact tracing TRANS and isolation being the main pillar of the national response, achieving the lowest cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the European region. Methods: We conducted a survey to estimate SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO among adult TRANS residents of capital city of Tbilisi ( adult TRANS population: 859,328). Participants were recruited through respondent driven sampling during May 18-27, 2020. Blood SERO specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO using commercially available lateral flow immunoassay SERO (COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette, Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech). Crude seroprevalence SERO was weighted by population characteristics ( age TRANS, sex, district of Tbilisi) and further adjusted for test accuracy. Results: Among 1,068 adults TRANS recruited 963 (90.2%) were between 18 and 64 years-old, 682 (63.9%) women. 176 (16.5%) reported symptoms indicative of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD occurring in previous three months. Nine persons tested positive for IgG: crude seroprevalence SERO: 0.84%, (95% CI: 0.33%-1.59%), weighted seroprevalence SERO: 0.94% (95% CI: 0.37%-1.95%), weighted and adjusted for test accuracy: 1.02% (95% CI: 0.38%-2.18%). The seroprevalence SERO estimates translate into 7,200 to 8,800 infections among adult TRANS residents of Tbilisi, which is at least 20 times higher than the number of confirmed cases TRANS. Conclusions: Low seroprevalence SERO confirms that Georgia successfully contained spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of pandemic. Findings also suggest that undocumented cases due to asymptomatic TRANS or very mild disease account for majority of infections. Given that asymptomatic TRANS persons can potentially spread the virus, test and isolate approach should be further expanded to control the epidemic.

    Seroprevalence SERO of Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in US Blood SERO Donors

    Authors: Ralph R Vassallo; Marjorie D Bravo; Larry J Dumont; Kelsey Hazegh; Hany Kamel; Ehab F Abdo; Benjamin S Abella; Javed Akram; Ravi K Amaravadi; Derek C Angus; Yaseen M Arabi; Shehnoor Azhar; Lindsey R Baden; Arthur W Baker; Leila Belkhir; Thomas Benfield; Marvin A H Berrevoets; Cheng-Pin Chen; Tsung-Chia Chen; Shu-Hsing Cheng; Chien-Yu Cheng; Wei-Sheng Chung; Yehuda Z Cohen; Lisa N Cowan; Olav Dalgard; Fernando F de Almeida e Val; Marcus V G de Lacerda; Gisely C de Melo; Lennie Derde; Vincent Dubee; Anissa Elfakir; Anthony C Gordon; Carmen M Hernandez-Cardenas; Thomas Hills; Andy I M Hoepelman; Yi-Wen Huang; Bruno Igau; Ronghua Jin; Felipe Jurado-Camacho; Khalid S Khan; Peter G Kremsner; Benno Kreuels; Cheng-Yu Kuo; Thuy Le; Yi-Chun Lin; Wu-Pu Lin; Tse-Hung Lin; Magnus Nakrem Lyngbakken; Colin McArthur; Bryan McVerry; Patricia Meza-Meneses; Wuelton M Monteiro; Susan C Morpeth; Ahmad Mourad; Mark J Mulligan; Srinivas Murthy; Susanna Naggie; Shanti Narayanasamy; Alistair Nichol; Lewis A Novack; Sean M O'Brien; Nwora Lance Okeke; Lena Perez; Rogelio Perez-Padilla; Laurent Perrin; Arantxa Remigio-Luna; Norma E Rivera-Martinez; Frank W Rockhold; Sebastian Rodriguez-Llamazares; Robert Rolfe; Rossana Rosa; Helge Rosjo; Vanderson S Sampaio; Todd B Seto; Muhammad Shehzad; Shaimaa Soliman; Jason E Stout; Ireri Thirion-Romero; Andrea B Troxel; Ting-Yu Tseng; Nicholas A Turner; Robert J Ulrich; Stephen R Walsh; Steve A Webb; Jesper M Weehuizen; Maria Velinova; Hon-Lai Wong; Rebekah Wrenn; Fernando G Zampieri; Wu Zhong; David Moher; Steven N Goodman; John P A Ioannidis; Lars G Hemkens

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.17.20195131 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background To identify blood SERO donors eligible to donate Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) Convalescent Plasma SERO (CCP), a large blood SERO center began testing for antibodies SERO to SARS-CoV-2, the etiologic agent of COVID-19. We report the seroprevalence SERO of total immunoglobulin directed against the S1 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in US blood SERO donors. Methods Unique non-CCP donor sera from June 1-July 31, 2020 were tested with the Ortho VITROS Anti-SARS-CoV-2 total immunoglobulin assay (positive: signal-to-cutoff (S/C) =>1). Donor age TRANS, sex, race/ethnicity, ABO/RhD, education, and experience were compared to June and July 2019. Multivariate regressions were conducted to identify demographics associated with the presence of antibodies SERO and with S/C values. Results Unique donors (n=252,882) showed an overall seroprevalence SERO of 1.83% in June (1.37%) and July (2.26%), with the highest prevalence SERO in northern New Jersey (7.3%). In a subset of donors with demographic information (n=189,565), higher odds of antibody SERO reactivity were associated with non-Hispanic Native American/Alaskan (NH-NAA/A) and Black (NH-B), and Hispanic (H) race/ethnicity, age TRANS 18-64, middle school or lesser education, blood SERO Group A, and never or non-recent donor status. In positive donors (n=2,831), antibody SERO signal was associated with male TRANS sex, race/ethnicity (NH-NAA/A, NH-B and H) and geographic location. Conclusions Seroprevalence SERO remains low in US blood SERO donors but varies significantly by region. Temporal trends in reactivity may be used to gauge the effectiveness of public health measures. Before generalizing these data from healthy donors to the general population however, rates must be corrected for false positive test results among low prevalence SERO test subjects and adjusted to match the wider demography.

    COVID-19 and human milk: SARS-CoV-2, antibodies, and neutralizing SERO capacity

    Authors: Ryan M Pace; Janet E Williams; Kirsi M Järvinen; Mandy B Belfort; Christina DW Pace; Kimberly A Lackey; Alexandra C Gogel; Phuong Nguyen-Contant; Preshetha Kanagaiah; Theresa Fitzgerald; Rita Ferri; Bridget Young; Casey Rosen-Carole; Nichole Diaz; Courtney Meehan; Beatrice Caffe; Mark Y Sangster; David J Topham; Mark A McGuire; Antti Seppo; Michelle K McGuire; Margaret E Ackerman; Lisa M Schilling; Vignesh Subbian; David Vizcaya; Lin Zhang; Ying Zhang; Hong Zhu; Li Liu; Peter Rijnbeek; George Hripcsak; Jennifer C.E Lane; Edward Burn; Christian Reich; Marc A Suchard; Talita Duarte-Salles; Krisitn Kosta; Patrick B Ryan; DANIEL PRIETO-ALHAMBRA; Christoph Lange; Georg Laue; Clemes Lier; Matthias Lindner; Georgios Marinos; Robert Markewitz; Jacob Nattermann; Rainer Noth; Peter Pickkers; Klaus F. Rabe; Alina Renz; Christoph Roecken; Jan Rupp; Annika Schaffarzyk; Alexander Scheffold; Jonas Schulte-Schrepping; Domagoj Schunck; Dirk Skowasch; Thomas Ulas; Klaus-Peter Wandinger; Michael Wittig; Johannes Zimmermann; Hauke Busch; Bimba F. Hoyer; Christoph Kaleta; Jan Heyckendorf; Matthijs Kox; Jan Rybniker; Stefan Schreiber; Joachim Schultze; Philip Rosenstiel; - HCA Lung Biological Network; - Deutsche COVID-19 Omics Initiative (DeCOI)

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20196071 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: It is not known whether SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted from mother to infant during breastfeeding, and if so whether the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk. This study was designed to evaluate 1) if SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected in milk and on the breast of infected MESHD women, 2) concentrations of milk-borne anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, and 3) the capacity of milk to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 infectivity MESHD. Methods: We collected 37 milk samples and 70 breast swabs (before and after breast washing) from 18 women recently diagnosed with COVID-19. Samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-qPCR. Milk was also analyzed for IgA and IgG specific for the nucleocapsid protein, receptor binding domain (RBD), S2 subunit of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, as well as 2 seasonal coronaviruses using ELISA SERO; and for its ability to neutralize SARS-CoV-2. Results: We did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in any milk sample. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected on several breast swabs, although only one was considered conclusive. All milk contained SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA and IgG, and levels of anti-RBD IgA correlated with SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Strong correlations between levels of IgA and IgG to SARS-CoV-2 and seasonal coronaviruses were noted. Conclusions: Our data do not support maternal-to- child TRANS transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 via milk; however, risk of transmission TRANS via breast skin MESHD should be further evaluated. Importantly, milk produced by infected mothers is a source of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 activity. These results support recommendations to continue breastfeeding during mild-to-moderate maternal COVID-19 illness.

    Variation across population subgroups of COVID-19 antibody testing SERO performance SERO

    Authors: Halley L Brantley; Richard M Yoo; Glen I Jones; Marel A Stock; Peter J Park; Natalie E Sheils; Isaac S Kohane; Mariya Lytvyn; María Isabel Guillén; David Sanz-Rosa; Daniel Martín-Pérez; Cristina Sanchez-Ramos; Ricardo Garcia; Juan Antonio Bernal; Sijia Tao; Tristan R Horton; Elizabeth N Beagle; Ernestine A Mahar; Michelle YH Lee; Joyce Cohen; Sherrie Jean; Jennifer S Wood; Fawn Connor-Stroud; Rachelle L Stammen; Olivia M Delmas; Shelly Wang; Kimberly A Cooney; Michael N Sayegh; Lanfang Wang; Daniela Weiskopf; Peter D Filev; Jesse Waggoner; Anne Piantadosi; Sudhir P Kasturi; Hilmi Al-Shakhshir; Susan P Ribeiro; Rafick P Sekaly; Rebecca D Levit; Jacob D Estes; Thomas H Vanderford; Raymond F Schinazi; Steven E Bosinger; Mirko Paiardini

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.14.20191833 Date: 2020-09-16 Source: medRxiv

    Understanding variations in the performance SERO of serological tests SERO for SARS-CoV-2 across varying demographics is relevant to clinical interpretations and public policy derived from their results. Appropriate use of serological assays SERO to detect anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO requires estimation of their accuracy over large populations and an understanding of the variance in performance SERO over time and across demographic groups. In this manuscript we focus on anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG, IgA, and IgM antibody SERO tests approved under emergency use authorizations and determine the recall SERO of the serological tests SERO compared to RT-PCR tests by Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINCs). Variability in test performance SERO was further examined over time and by demographics. The recall SERO of the most common IgG assay (LOINC 94563-4) was 91.2% (95% CI: 90.5%, 91.9%). IgA (LOINC 94562-6) and IgM (94564-2) assays performed significantly worse than IgG assays with estimated recall SERO rates of 20.6% and 27.3%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in recall SERO (p = 0.019) was observed across sex with a higher recall SERO in males TRANS than females TRANS, 92.1% and 90.4%, respectively. Recall SERO also differed significantly by age group TRANS, with higher recall SERO in those over 45 compared to those under 45, 92.9% and 88.0%, respectively (p < 0.001). While race was unavailable for the majority of the individuals, a significant difference was observed between recall SERO in White individuals and Black individuals (p = 0.007) and White individuals and Hispanic individuals (p=0.001). The estimates of recall SERO were 89.3%, 95.9%, and 94.2% for White, Black, and Hispanic individuals respectively.

    Alternative or Complementary Role of Serological Rapid Antibody Test SERO in the Management of Possible COVID-19 Cases

    Authors: Fatma Yildirim; Pinar Yildiz Gulhan; Ozlem Ercen Diken; Aylin Capraz; Meltem Simsek; Berna Botan Yildirim; Muhammet Ridvan Taysi; Sakine Yilmaz Ozturk; Nurcan Demirtas; Julide Ergil; Adem Dirican; Tugce Uzar; Irem Karaman; Sevket OZKAYA; Elisa Resconi; Monica I Lupei; Christopher J Tignanelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.13.20193615 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Although the gold diagnostic method for COVID-19 is accepted as the detection of viral particles by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), serology testing for SARS-CoV-2 is at increased demand. A primary aim for utilization of serological tests SERO are to better quantify the number of COVID-19 cases including those RT-PCR samples were negative but showing clinical and radiological signs of COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to report the features of the patients that were diagnosed and treated as possible COVID-19 cases whose multiple nasopharyngeal swab samples were negative by RT-PCR but serological IgM/IgG antibody SERO against SARS-CoV-2 were detected by rapid antibody test SERO. Method: We retrospectively analyzed eighty suspected COVID-19 cases that have at least two negative consecutive COVID-19 PCR test and were subjected to serological rapid antibody test SERO. Result: The specific antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 were detected as positive in twenty-two patients. The mean age TRANS of patient group was 63.2+-13.1 years old with male TRANS / female TRANS ratio 11/11. Cough HP was the most common symptom with 90.9%. Most common presenting chest CT findings were bilateral ground glass opacities (77.2%) and alveolar MESHD consolidations (50.09%). The mean duration from symptom initiation to hospital admission, to hospitalization, to treatment initiation and to detection of antibody SERO positivity were 8.6 +- 7.2, 11.2 +- 5.4, 7.9 +- 3.2 and 24 +- 17 days, respectively. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated the feasibility of COVID-19 diagnosis based on rapid antibody test SERO in the cases of patients whose RT-PCR samples were negative. We suggest that the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 with rapid antibody test SERO should be included in the diagnostic algorithm in suspected COVID-19 patients.

    The King's College London Coronavirus Health and Experiences of Colleagues at King's Study: SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO response in an occupational sample

    Authors: Daniel Leightley; Valentina Vitiello; Gabriella Bergin-Cartwright; Alice Wickersham; Katrina A S Davis; Sharon Stevelink; Matthew Hotopf; Reza Razavi; - On behalf of the KCL CHECK research team; Bui Duc Thang; Nguyen Thi Hoai Thu; Le Thi Kim Chi; Nguyen Thi Hanh; Nguyen Huy Hoang; Chau Nguyen; Guy Thwaites; Do Thai Hung; Le Van Tan; Ngo Thi Kim Yen; Yu Chen; Shibo Jiang; Qiao Wang; Hongbin Ji; Youhua Xie; Yihua Sun; Lu Lu; Yunjiao Zhou

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20191841 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    We report test results for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in an occupational group of postgraduate research students and current members of staff at King's College London. Between June and July 2020, antibody testing SERO kits were sent to n=2296 participants; n=2004 (86.3%) responded, of whom n=1882 (93.9%) returned valid test results. Of those that returned valid results, n=124 (6.6%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, with initial comparisons showing variation by age group TRANS and clinical exposure.

    Retrospective study of COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors at the onset of the outbreak before implementation of strict lockdown measures in France

    Authors: Nicolas Germain; Stephanie Herwegh; Anne Sophie Hatzfeld; Laurence Bocket; Brigitte Prevost; Pierre Marie Danze; Philippe Marchetti; Rachael Dodd; Brooke Nickel; Kristen Pickles; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Kirsten J McCaffery; Aboubacar Sidiki Magassouba; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.20192518 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has altered organ and tissue donations as well as transplantation practices. SARS-CoV-2 serological tests SERO could help in the selection of donors. We assessed COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO in a population of tissue donors, at the onset of the outbreak in France, before systematic screening of donors for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Methods: 235 tissue donors at the Lille Tissue bank between November 1, 2019 and March 16, 2020 were included. Archived serum SERO samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using two FDA-approved kits. Results: Most donors were at higher risks for severe COVID-19 illness including age TRANS over 65 years (142/235) and/or presence of co-morbidities (141/235). According to the COVID-19 risk assessment of transmission TRANS, 183 out of 235 tissue donors presented with a low risk level and 52 donors with an intermediate risk level of donor derived infection MESHD. Four out of the 235 (1.7%) tested specimens were positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO: 2 donors with anti-N protein IgG and 2 other donors with anti-S protein total Ig. None of them had both type of antibodies SERO. Conclusion: Regarding the seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors, we concluded that the transmission TRANS probability to recipient via tissue products was very low at the beginning of the outbreak.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies SERO Among 925 Staff Members in an Urban Hospital Accepting COVID-19 Patients in Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Authors: Tsutomu Nishida; Hiromi Iwahashi; Kazuhiro Yamauchi; Noriko Kinoshita; Yukiyoshi Okauchi; Norihiro Suzuki; Masami Inada; Kinya Abe; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20191866 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD rate in hospitals during the pandemic remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of our hospital's current nosocomial infection control, we conducted a serological survey of the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO (immunoglobulin G) among the staff of our hospital, which is treating coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G in the participants using a laboratory-based quantitative test (Abbott immunoassay SERO), which has a sensitivity SERO and specificity of 100% and 99.6%, respectively. To investigate the factors associated with seropositivity, we also obtained some information from the participants with an anonymous questionnaire. Results: We invited 1133 staff members in our hospital, and 925 (82%) participated. The mean age TRANS of the participants was 40.0{+/-}11.8 years, and most were women (80.0%). According to job title, there were 149 medical doctors or dentists (16.0%), 489 nurses (52.9%), 140 medical technologists (14.2%), 49 healthcare providers (5.3%), and 98 administrative staff (10.5%). The overall prevalence SERO of seropositivity for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG was 0.43% (4/925), which was similar to the control seroprevalence SERO of 0.54% (16/2970)) in the general population in Osaka during the same period according to a government survey conducted with the same assay. Seropositive rates did not significantly differ according to job title, exposure to suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, or any other investigated factors. Conclusion: The subclinical SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rate in our hospital was not higher than that in the general population under our nosocomial infection MESHD control measures.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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