Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (9)

Anosmia (5)

Cough (5)

Myalgia (3)

Falls (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 135
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    Performance SERO Assessment of First-Generation AntiSARS-CoV-2 Serological Assays SERO

    Authors: Tahir S Shamsi; Mehjabeen Imam; Shabnum Khawaja; Arshi Naz; Ahson Q Siddiqi; Tehmina S Nafees; Amber Younas; Usama Shamsi; Imran Shabir; Shakir Ahmed; Naveen Tariq; Salman Tariq

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.22.20197046 Date: 2020-09-24 Source: medRxiv

    The clinical and epidemiological use of SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO assays is under debate with urgent need to validate and verify the performance SERO of SARS-CoV-2 serologic assays. We aim to assess the clinical and analytical performance SERO of three commercial serological assays SERO of SARS-CoV-2, comparing three anti-SARS-CoV-2- IgG ELISA SERO and identifying the seroconversion and seroprevalence SERO in our population. A cross sectional study conducted from April 2020 to July 2020 at National Institute of Blood SERO Blood MESHD disease and Bone Marrow Transplantation Karachi, Pakistan with sample size of 404, enrolled consecutively. Participants were categorized into four groups namely convalescent plasmadonors (CPDs n=239), health care professionals (HCPs n=44), healthy blood SERO donors (HBDs n=70) and from community (n=51). We evaluated the performance SERO of Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) assay on Cobas-e411 by Roche, three qualitative anti-SARS-CoV-2-IgG enzyme linked imunosorbant assay (ELISA SERO) by (Generic assays, Euroimmun & Omega diagnostics) ,one quantitative ELISA assay SERO by AESKU Diagnostics and two immune chromatography(ICT) kits namely InstaTestTM by CORTEZ and TEST IT by TURKLAB. From total 404 subjects, 322 (83.5%) were males TRANS. Mean age TRANS was 36.79 plus minus 11.95 years. Among 239 in CPDs group, 202(84.5%) showed positive antibodies SERO by ECLIA. The qualitative anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA SERO was positive in 174 (72.8%) and quantitative IgG in 180(75.3%) with mean titer of 56.7 plus minus 39.7 U/ml. Sensitivity SERO and specificity of ECLIA were 97.44& 99%, ELISA SERO by Generic assays were 67.85% and 89.9%; Euroimmun had 90.38% and 94.9%; Omega Diagnostics 96.4% and 95% and the AESKULISA 93.75% and 100% respectively. Seroconversion was found to be 53.8% and 77.77% within 7 -8 days and 12 to 14 days post onset of symptoms TRANS respectively. ICT had more specificity but less sensitivity SERO. Seroprevalence SERO was found to be 84.5%, 40.9% and 21.4% in CPDs, HCPs and HBDs respectively. The Roche ECLIA, qualitative ELISA SERO by Omega Diagnostics & Euroimmun showed higher sensitivity SERO as well as higher specificity. Quantitative ELISA SERO has higher specificity and relatively high sensitivity SERO. Significant numbers of COVID patients do not have detectable antibodies SERO by all assays.

    Seroprevalence SERO of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in ophthalmic patients

    Authors: shengjie li Sr.; yichao qiu; li tang; zhujian wang; wenjun cao; gezhi xu; xinghuai sun; Philippa C Matthews; Jienchi Dorward; Bernhard Graf; Florian Hitzenbichler; Frank Hanses; Hendrik Poeck; Marina Kreutz; Evelyn Orso; Ralph Burkhardt; Tanja Niedermair; Christoph Brochhausen; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Matthias Mack; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.22.20198465 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Using serological test SERO to estimate the prevalence SERO and infection potential of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 in ocular diseases MESHD patients help understand the relationship between ocular diseases MESHD and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD. We conducted a cross-sectional study assaying the IgG and IgM antibodies SERO in 1331 individuals with ocular diseases MESHD by using a magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay SERO kit, during the period from February 2020 to May 2020. In our study, the seroposivity in total ocular disease MESHD patients was 0.83% (11/1331). The patients with different ocular diseases MESHD including xerophthalmia MESHD, keratitis HP keratitis MESHD, conjunctival cyst, cataract HP cataract MESHD, glaucoma HP glaucoma MESHD, refractive error, strabismus HP and others had seroposivity of 2.94%, 12.5%, 25%, 4.41%, 2.63%, 1.6%, 2.22% and 0%, respectively. Among that, two ocular surface disease groups ( keratitis HP keratitis MESHD and conjunctival cyst) had higher seroprevalence SERO compared with others. All the participants were reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction negative for SARS-CoV-2 from throat swabs. Our study evaluated the seroprevalence SERO in patients with different ocular diseases MESHD, which will help us understand the relationship between ocular disease MESHD and SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Furthermore, the serological test SERO for the presence of IgM and/or IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 might provide accurate estimate of the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in patients with ocular diseases MESHD.

    Dynamic Change of COVID-19 Seroprevalence SERO among Asymptomatic TRANS Population in Tokyo during the Second Wave

    Authors: Sawako Hibino; Kazutaka Hayashida; Andrew C Ahn; Yasutaka Hayashida; Julia Bielicki; Tim Roloff; Roland Bingisser; Christian Nickel; Nina Khanna; Sarah Tschudin; Andreas Widmer; Katharina Rentsch; Hans Pargger; Martin Siegemund; Daiana Stolz; Michael Tamm; Stefano Bassetti; Michael Osthoff; Manuel Battegay; Adrian Egli; Hans H Hirsch; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.21.20198796 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Fatality rates related to COVID-19 in Japan have been low compared to Western Countries and have decreased despite the absence of lockdown. Serological tests SERO monitored across the course of the second wave can provide insights into the population-level prevalence SERO and dynamic patterns of COVID-19 infection MESHD. Objective: To assess changes in COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among asymptomatic TRANS employees working in Tokyo during the second wave. Design: We conducted an observational cohort study. Healthy volunteers working for a Japanese company in Tokyo were enrolled from disparate locations to determine seropositivity against COVID19 from May 26 to August 25, 2020. COVID-19 IgM and IgG antibodies SERO were determined by a rapid COVID19 IgM/IgG test kit using fingertip blood SERO. Across the company, tests were performed and acquired weekly. For each participant, serology tests were offered twice, separated by approximately a month, to provide self-reference of test results and to assess for seroconversion and seroreversion. Setting: Workplace setting within a large company. Participants: Healthy volunteers from 1877 employees of a large Japanese company were recruited to the study from 11 disparate locations across Tokyo. Participants having fever HP fever MESHD, cough HP cough MESHD, or shortness of breath MESHD at the time of testing were excluded. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): Seropositivity rate (SPR) was calculated by pooled data from each two-weeks window across the cohort. Either IgM or IgG positivity was defined as seropositive. Changes in immunological status against SARS-CoV-2 were determined by comparing results between two tests obtained from the same individual. Results: Six hundred fifteen healthy volunteers (mean + SD 40.8 + 10.0; range 19-69; 45.7 % female TRANS) received at least one test. Seroprevalence SERO increased from 5.8 % to 46.8 % over the course of the summer. The most dramatic increase in SPR occurred in late June and early July, paralleling the rise in daily confirmed cases TRANS within Tokyo, which peaked on August 4. Out of the 350 individuals (mean + SD 42.5 + 10.0; range 19-69; 46.0 % female TRANS) who completed both offered tests, 21.4 % of those individuals who tested seronegative became seropositive and seroreversion was found in 12.2 % of initially seropositive participants. 81.1% of IgM positive cases at first testing became IgM negative in approximately one month. Conclusions and Relevance: COVID-19 infection MESHD may have spread widely across the general population of Tokyo despite the very low fatality rate. Given the temporal correlation between the rise in seropositivity and the decrease in reported COVID-19 cases that occurred without a shut-down, herd immunity may be implicated. Sequential testing for serological SERO response against COVID-19 is useful for understanding the dynamics of COVID-19 infection at the population-level.

    COVID-19 herd immunity in the Brazilian Amazon

    Authors: Lewis F Buss; Carlos Augusto Prete Jr.; Claudia MM Abrahim; Alfredo Mendrone Jr.; Tassila Salomon; Cesar de Almeida-Neto; Rafael FO França; Maria C Belotti; Maria PSS Carvalho; Allyson G Costa; Myuki AE Crispim; Suzete C Ferreira; Nelson A Fraiji; Susie Gurzenda; Charles Whittaker; Leonardo T Kamaura; Pedro L Takecian; Márcio K Moikawa; Anna S Nishiya; Vanderson Rocha; Nanci A Salles; Andreza A de Souza Santos; Martirene A da Silva; Brian Custer; Manoel Barral-Netto; Moritz Kraemer; Rafael HM Pererira; Oliver G Pybus; Michael P Busch; Márcia C Castro; Christopher Dye; Vitor H Nascimento; Nuno R Faria; Ester C Sabino

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20194787 Date: 2020-09-21 Source: medRxiv

    The herd immunity threshold is the proportion of a population that must be immune to an infectious disease MESHD, either by natural infection MESHD or vaccination such that, in the absence of additional preventative measures, new cases decline and the effective reproduction number TRANS falls HP below unity. This fundamental epidemiological parameter is still unknown for the recently-emerged COVID-19, and mathematical models have predicted very divergent results. Population studies using antibody testing SERO to infer total cumulative infections can provide empirical evidence of the level of population immunity in severely affected areas. Here we show that the transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in Manaus, located in the Brazilian Amazon, increased quickly during March and April and declined more slowly from May to September. In June, one month following the epidemic peak, 44% of the population was seropositive for SARS-CoV-2, equating to a cumulative incidence of 52%, after correcting for the false-negative rate of the antibody test SERO. The seroprevalence SERO fell HP in July and August due to antibody SERO waning. After correcting for this, we estimate a final epidemic size of 66%. Although non-pharmaceutical interventions, plus a change in population behavior, may have helped to limit SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS in Manaus, the unusually high infection rate suggests that herd immunity played a significant role in determining the size of the epidemic.

    SARS-CoV-2 antigen and antibody SERO prevalence SERO among UK staff working with cancer MESHD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Authors: David M Favara; Karen McAdam; Anthony Cooke; Alex Bordessa-Kelly; Ieva Budriunaite; Sophie Bossingham; Sally Houghton; Rainer Doffinger; Nicola Ainsworth; Pippa Corrie; Yimin Tong; Jin Zhong; Youhua Xie; Xinquan Wang; Zhenghong Yuan; Dongming Zhou; Rong Zhang; Qiang Ding; Kristen J Brennand; Katherine H Hullsiek; David R Boulware; SARAH M LOFGREN; Martirene A da Silva; Brian Custer; Manoel Barral-Netto; Moritz Kraemer; Rafael HM Pererira; Oliver G Pybus; Michael P Busch; Márcia C Castro; Christopher Dye; Vitor H Nascimento; Nuno R Faria; Ester C Sabino

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20197590 Date: 2020-09-20 Source: medRxiv

    Background International guidelines for testing potentially immunosuppressed cancer MESHD patients receiving non-surgical anticancer therapies for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) are currently lacking. The value of routinely testing staff treating cancer MESHD patients is not known. Methods: Patient-facing oncology department staff at work during the COVID-19 pandemic consented to have a nasopharyngeal swab SARS-CoV-2 antigen test by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood SERO tests for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO using a laboratory Luminex-based assay and a rapid point-of-care (POC) assay on 2 occasions 28 days apart in June and July 2020. Results 434 participants were recruited: nurses (58.3%), doctors (21.2%), radiographers (10.4%) and administrators (10.1%). 82% were female TRANS; median age TRANS 40-years (range 19-66). 26.3% reported prior symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 1.4% tested PCR-positive prior to June 2020. All were PCR-negative at both study day 1 and 28. 18.4% were SARS-CoV-2 sero-positive on day 1 by Luminex, of whom 42.5% also tested positive by POC. 47.5% of Luminex sero-positives had antibodies SERO to both nucleocapsid (N) and surface (S) antigens. Nurses (21.3%) and doctors (17.4%) had higher prevalence SERO trends of Luminex sero-positivity compared with administrators (13.6%) and radiographers (8.9%) (p=0.2). 38% of sero-positive participants reported previous symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, a 1.9-fold higher odds than sero-negative participants (p=0.01). 400 participants re-tested on day 28: 13.3% were Luminex sero-positive of whom 92.5% were previously positive and 7.5% newly positive. Nurses (16.5%) had the highest seroprevalence SERO trend amongst staff groups (p=0.07). 32.5% of day 1 sero-positives became sero-negative by day 28: the majority being previously reactive to the N-antigen only (p<0.0001). Conclusion The high prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 IgG sero-positivity in oncology nurses, and the high decline of positivity over 4 weeks supports regular antigen and antibody testing SERO in this staff group for SARS-CoV-2 as part of routine patient care prior to availability of a vaccine.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 among adults TRANS in three regions of France following the lockdown and associated risk factors: a multicohort study.

    Authors: Fabrice Carrat; Xavier de Lamballerie; Delphine Rahib; Helene Blanche; Nathanael Lapidus; Fanny Artaud; Sofiane Kab; Adeline Renuy; Fabien Szabo de Edelenyi; Laurence Meyer; Nathalie Lydie; Marie-Aline Charles; Pierre-Yves Ancel; Florence Jusot; Alexandra Rouquette; Stephane Priet; Paola M Saba Villaroel; Toscane Fourie; Clovis Lusivika-Nzinga; Jerome Nicol; Stephane Legot; Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo; Younes Essedik; Cindy Lai; Jean-Marie Gagliolo; Jean-Francois Deleuze; Nathalie Bajos; Gianluca Severi; Mathilde Touvier; Marie Zins

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195693 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Aim To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in May-June 2020 after the lockdown in adults TRANS living in three regions in France and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods Participants in a survey on COVID-19 from an existing consortium of three general adult TRANS population cohorts living in the Ile-de-France (IDF) or Grand Est (GE), two regions with high rate of COVID-19, or in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine (NA), with a low rate, were asked to take a dried- blood SERO spot (DBS) for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO assessment. The primary outcome was a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG SERO result against the spike protein of the virus ( ELISA SERO-S). The secondary outcomes were a positive ELISA IgG SERO against the nucleocapsid protein ( ELISA SERO-NP), anti- SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO titers >=40 (SN), and predicted positivity obtained from a multiple imputation model ( MI MESHD). Prevalence SERO estimates were adjusted using sampling weights and post-stratification methods. Findings Between May 4, 2020 and June 23, 2020, 16,000 participants were asked to provide DBS, and 14,628 were included in the analysis, 983 with a positive ELISA SERO-S, 511 with a positive ELISA SERO-NP, 424 with SN>=40 and 941 (Standard Deviation=31) with a positive MI MESHD. Adjusted estimates of seroprevalence SERO (positive ELISA SERO-S) were 10.0% (95%CI 9.1%;10.9%) in IDF, 9.0% (95%CI 7.7%; 10.2%) in GE and 3.1% (95%CI 2.4%; 3.7%), in NA. The adjusted prevalence SERO of positive ELISA SERO-NP, SN and MI MESHD were 5.7%, 5.0% and 10.0% in IDF, 6.0%, 4.3% and 8.6% in GE, and 0.6%, 1.3% and 2.5% in NA, respectively. A higher seroprevalence SERO was observed in younger participants and when at least one child TRANS or adolescent lived in the same household. A lower seroprevalence SERO was observed in smokers compared to non-smokers. Interpretation At the end of the lockdown the prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG or neutralizing antibodies SERO remained low in the French adult TRANS population, even in regions with high reported rates of COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in Tbilisi, the capital city of country of Georgia

    Authors: Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Lana Gatserelia; Marine Mirziashvili; Natia Dvali; Akaki Abutidze; Revaz Metchurtchlishvili; Carlos del Rio; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Alic Peuker; Gabriele Schoenhammer; Johanna Raithel; Dirk Lunz; Bernhard Graf; Florian Geismann; Matthias Lubnow; Matthias Mack; Peter Hau; Christopher Bohr; Ralph Burkhardt; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Frank Hanses; Florian Hitzenbichler; Daniel Heudobler; Florian Lueke; Tobias Pukrop; Wolfgang Herr; Daniel Wolff; Hendrik Poeck; Christoph Brochhausen; Petra Hoffmann; Michael Rehli; Marina Kreutz; Kathrin Renner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20195024 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Georgia timely implemented effective response measures, with testing, contact tracing TRANS and isolation being the main pillar of the national response, achieving the lowest cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the European region. Methods: We conducted a survey to estimate SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO among adult TRANS residents of capital city of Tbilisi ( adult TRANS population: 859,328). Participants were recruited through respondent driven sampling during May 18-27, 2020. Blood SERO specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO using commercially available lateral flow immunoassay SERO (COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette, Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech). Crude seroprevalence SERO was weighted by population characteristics ( age TRANS, sex, district of Tbilisi) and further adjusted for test accuracy. Results: Among 1,068 adults TRANS recruited 963 (90.2%) were between 18 and 64 years-old, 682 (63.9%) women. 176 (16.5%) reported symptoms indicative of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD occurring in previous three months. Nine persons tested positive for IgG: crude seroprevalence SERO: 0.84%, (95% CI: 0.33%-1.59%), weighted seroprevalence SERO: 0.94% (95% CI: 0.37%-1.95%), weighted and adjusted for test accuracy: 1.02% (95% CI: 0.38%-2.18%). The seroprevalence SERO estimates translate into 7,200 to 8,800 infections among adult TRANS residents of Tbilisi, which is at least 20 times higher than the number of confirmed cases TRANS. Conclusions: Low seroprevalence SERO confirms that Georgia successfully contained spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of pandemic. Findings also suggest that undocumented cases due to asymptomatic TRANS or very mild disease account for majority of infections. Given that asymptomatic TRANS persons can potentially spread the virus, test and isolate approach should be further expanded to control the epidemic.

    Seroprevalence SERO of Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in US Blood SERO Donors

    Authors: Ralph R Vassallo; Marjorie D Bravo; Larry J Dumont; Kelsey Hazegh; Hany Kamel; Ehab F Abdo; Benjamin S Abella; Javed Akram; Ravi K Amaravadi; Derek C Angus; Yaseen M Arabi; Shehnoor Azhar; Lindsey R Baden; Arthur W Baker; Leila Belkhir; Thomas Benfield; Marvin A H Berrevoets; Cheng-Pin Chen; Tsung-Chia Chen; Shu-Hsing Cheng; Chien-Yu Cheng; Wei-Sheng Chung; Yehuda Z Cohen; Lisa N Cowan; Olav Dalgard; Fernando F de Almeida e Val; Marcus V G de Lacerda; Gisely C de Melo; Lennie Derde; Vincent Dubee; Anissa Elfakir; Anthony C Gordon; Carmen M Hernandez-Cardenas; Thomas Hills; Andy I M Hoepelman; Yi-Wen Huang; Bruno Igau; Ronghua Jin; Felipe Jurado-Camacho; Khalid S Khan; Peter G Kremsner; Benno Kreuels; Cheng-Yu Kuo; Thuy Le; Yi-Chun Lin; Wu-Pu Lin; Tse-Hung Lin; Magnus Nakrem Lyngbakken; Colin McArthur; Bryan McVerry; Patricia Meza-Meneses; Wuelton M Monteiro; Susan C Morpeth; Ahmad Mourad; Mark J Mulligan; Srinivas Murthy; Susanna Naggie; Shanti Narayanasamy; Alistair Nichol; Lewis A Novack; Sean M O'Brien; Nwora Lance Okeke; Lena Perez; Rogelio Perez-Padilla; Laurent Perrin; Arantxa Remigio-Luna; Norma E Rivera-Martinez; Frank W Rockhold; Sebastian Rodriguez-Llamazares; Robert Rolfe; Rossana Rosa; Helge Rosjo; Vanderson S Sampaio; Todd B Seto; Muhammad Shehzad; Shaimaa Soliman; Jason E Stout; Ireri Thirion-Romero; Andrea B Troxel; Ting-Yu Tseng; Nicholas A Turner; Robert J Ulrich; Stephen R Walsh; Steve A Webb; Jesper M Weehuizen; Maria Velinova; Hon-Lai Wong; Rebekah Wrenn; Fernando G Zampieri; Wu Zhong; David Moher; Steven N Goodman; John P A Ioannidis; Lars G Hemkens

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.17.20195131 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background To identify blood SERO donors eligible to donate Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) Convalescent Plasma SERO (CCP), a large blood SERO center began testing for antibodies SERO to SARS-CoV-2, the etiologic agent of COVID-19. We report the seroprevalence SERO of total immunoglobulin directed against the S1 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in US blood SERO donors. Methods Unique non-CCP donor sera from June 1-July 31, 2020 were tested with the Ortho VITROS Anti-SARS-CoV-2 total immunoglobulin assay (positive: signal-to-cutoff (S/C) =>1). Donor age TRANS, sex, race/ethnicity, ABO/RhD, education, and experience were compared to June and July 2019. Multivariate regressions were conducted to identify demographics associated with the presence of antibodies SERO and with S/C values. Results Unique donors (n=252,882) showed an overall seroprevalence SERO of 1.83% in June (1.37%) and July (2.26%), with the highest prevalence SERO in northern New Jersey (7.3%). In a subset of donors with demographic information (n=189,565), higher odds of antibody SERO reactivity were associated with non-Hispanic Native American/Alaskan (NH-NAA/A) and Black (NH-B), and Hispanic (H) race/ethnicity, age TRANS 18-64, middle school or lesser education, blood SERO Group A, and never or non-recent donor status. In positive donors (n=2,831), antibody SERO signal was associated with male TRANS sex, race/ethnicity (NH-NAA/A, NH-B and H) and geographic location. Conclusions Seroprevalence SERO remains low in US blood SERO donors but varies significantly by region. Temporal trends in reactivity may be used to gauge the effectiveness of public health measures. Before generalizing these data from healthy donors to the general population however, rates must be corrected for false positive test results among low prevalence SERO test subjects and adjusted to match the wider demography.

    Early Release Estimates for SARS-CoV-2 Prevalence SERO and Antibody SERO Response Interim Weighting for Probability-Based Sample Surveys

    Authors: Heather Bradley; Mansour Fahimi; Travis Sanchez; Ben Lopman; Martin Frankel; Colleen Kelley; Richard Rothenberg; Aaron J Siegler; Patrick S Sullivan; Md. Nur Islam; Newaz Mohammed Bahadur; Md. Didar ul Alam; Hasan Mahmud Reza; Md. Jakariya

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20195099 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Many months into the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, basic epidemiologic parameters describing burden of disease are lacking. To reduce selection bias in current burden of disease estimates derived from diagnostic testing data or serologic testing SERO in convenience samples, we are conducting a national probability-based sample SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey. Sampling from a national address-based frame and using mailed recruitment materials and test kits will allow us to estimate national prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and antibodies SERO, overall and by demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics. Data will be weighted for unequal selection probabilities and non-response and will be adjusted to population benchmarks. Due to the urgent need for these estimates, expedited interim weighting of serosurvey responses will be undertaken to produce early release estimates, which will be published on the study website, COVIDVu.org. Here, we describe a process for computing interim survey weights and guidelines for release of interim estimates.

    Impact of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO at delivery in women, partners and newborns

    Authors: Pia Egerup; Line Fich Olsen; Ann-Marie Hellerung Christiansen; David Westergaard; Elin Rosenbek Severinsen; Kathrine Vauvert Roemmelmayer Hviid; Astrid Marie Kolte; Amalie Dyhrberg Boje; Marie-Louise Mathilde Friis Bertelsen; Lisbeth Praetorius; Anne Zedeler; Josefine Reinhardt Nielsen; Didi Bang; Sine Berntsen; Jeppe Ethelberg-Findsen; Ditte Marie Storm; Judith Bello-Rodriguez; Andreas Ingham; Joaquim Olle-Lopez; Eva Hoffmann; Charlotte Wilken-Jensen; Lone Krebs; Finn Stener Joergensen; Henrik Torkil Westh; Henrik Lovendahl Jorgensen; Nina la Cour Freiesleben; Henriette Svarre Nielsen

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.14.20191106 Date: 2020-09-15 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Only few studies have focused on serological testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 in pregnant women and no previous study has investigated the frequency in partners. The aim was to investigate the frequency and impact of SARS-CoV-2 in parturient women, their partners and newborns. Methods: From April 4th to July 3rd, 2020, all parturient women, their partners and newborns were invited to participate in the study. Participating women and partners had a pharyngeal swab and a blood SERO sample taken at admission and immediately after delivery a blood SERO sample was drawn from the umbilical cord. The swabs were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by PCR and the blood SERO samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Full medical history, obstetric- and neonatal information were available. Results: A total of 1,361 parturient women, 1,236 partners and 1,342 newborns participated in the study. No associations between previous COVID-19 disease and obstetric- or neonatal complications were found. The adjusted serological prevalence SERO was 2.9% in women and 3.8% in partners. The frequency of blood SERO type A was significantly higher in women with antibodies SERO compared to women without antibodies SERO. 17 newborns had SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, and none had IgM antibodies SERO. Full serological data from 1,052 families showed an absolute risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS of 0.37 if the partner had antibodies SERO. Only 55% of individuals with antibodies SERO reported symptoms. Conclusion: This large prospective cohort study reports no association between COVID-19 and obstetric- or neonatal complications. The family pattern showed a substantial increase in absolute risk for women living with a partner with antibodies SERO.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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