Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (15)

Anosmia (5)

Cough (5)

Dyspnea (3)

Pneumonia (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 110
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    Dynamic Change of COVID-19 Seroprevalence SERO among Asymptomatic TRANS Population in Tokyo during the Second Wave

    Authors: Sawako Hibino; Kazutaka Hayashida; Andrew C Ahn; Yasutaka Hayashida; Julia Bielicki; Tim Roloff; Roland Bingisser; Christian Nickel; Nina Khanna; Sarah Tschudin; Andreas Widmer; Katharina Rentsch; Hans Pargger; Martin Siegemund; Daiana Stolz; Michael Tamm; Stefano Bassetti; Michael Osthoff; Manuel Battegay; Adrian Egli; Hans H Hirsch; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.21.20198796 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Fatality rates related to COVID-19 in Japan have been low compared to Western Countries and have decreased despite the absence of lockdown. Serological tests SERO monitored across the course of the second wave can provide insights into the population-level prevalence SERO and dynamic patterns of COVID-19 infection MESHD. Objective: To assess changes in COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among asymptomatic TRANS employees working in Tokyo during the second wave. Design: We conducted an observational cohort study. Healthy volunteers working for a Japanese company in Tokyo were enrolled from disparate locations to determine seropositivity against COVID19 from May 26 to August 25, 2020. COVID-19 IgM and IgG antibodies SERO were determined by a rapid COVID19 IgM/IgG test kit using fingertip blood SERO. Across the company, tests were performed and acquired weekly. For each participant, serology tests were offered twice, separated by approximately a month, to provide self-reference of test results and to assess for seroconversion and seroreversion. Setting: Workplace setting within a large company. Participants: Healthy volunteers from 1877 employees of a large Japanese company were recruited to the study from 11 disparate locations across Tokyo. Participants having fever HP fever MESHD, cough HP cough MESHD, or shortness of breath MESHD at the time of testing were excluded. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s): Seropositivity rate (SPR) was calculated by pooled data from each two-weeks window across the cohort. Either IgM or IgG positivity was defined as seropositive. Changes in immunological status against SARS-CoV-2 were determined by comparing results between two tests obtained from the same individual. Results: Six hundred fifteen healthy volunteers (mean + SD 40.8 + 10.0; range 19-69; 45.7 % female TRANS) received at least one test. Seroprevalence SERO increased from 5.8 % to 46.8 % over the course of the summer. The most dramatic increase in SPR occurred in late June and early July, paralleling the rise in daily confirmed cases TRANS within Tokyo, which peaked on August 4. Out of the 350 individuals (mean + SD 42.5 + 10.0; range 19-69; 46.0 % female TRANS) who completed both offered tests, 21.4 % of those individuals who tested seronegative became seropositive and seroreversion was found in 12.2 % of initially seropositive participants. 81.1% of IgM positive cases at first testing became IgM negative in approximately one month. Conclusions and Relevance: COVID-19 infection MESHD may have spread widely across the general population of Tokyo despite the very low fatality rate. Given the temporal correlation between the rise in seropositivity and the decrease in reported COVID-19 cases that occurred without a shut-down, herd immunity may be implicated. Sequential testing for serological SERO response against COVID-19 is useful for understanding the dynamics of COVID-19 infection at the population-level.

    Retinal imaging study diagnoses a case of COVID-19

    Authors: Jorge Ruiz-Medrano; José Manuel Ortiz-Egea; José María Ruiz-Moreno

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-82692/v1 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Hyper-reflective lesions at the level of ganglion cell (GCL) and inner plexiform retinal layers (IPL) by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and cotton wool spots in the examination of the eye fundus have recently been described as findings in patients with COVID-19 infection MESHD.Case report: We report a case of a 42-year-old male TRANS anesthetist who treated COVID patients during the previous five weeks and suddenly debuted with a temporal relative scotoma HP scotoma MESHD in his left eye (OS); three weeks before, he presented with ageusia for several days. Best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 for OS; no discromatopsy or afferent pupillary defect MESHD were present. Visual field was performed, with no significant findings associated to the focal loss of sensitivity SERO referred by the patient. The anterior segment was unremarkable on slit lamp examination in both eyes. Fundus examination of the left eye showed no significant findings. A placoid, hyperreflective band at the level of GCL and IPL was visible in the temporal and nasal side of the fovea on OCT which spared the outer retina, at the time of diagnosis and at one month. A propharyngeal swab test for SARS-CoV-2 RNA, IgG and IgM ELISA SERO determinations were performed. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) was negative. ELISA SERO testing and a third rapid antibody SERO detection test performed 7 days after the onset of symptoms TRANS were positive.Conclusions: Ocular signs and symptoms in COVID cases are rarely reported, but may be underestimated, especially those that affect the retina and occur in asymptomatic TRANS or paucisymptomatic cases. We present the first case of diagnosis of COVID-19 based on retinal ophthalmic examination. 

    Cost-effective serological test SERO to determine exposure to SARS-CoV-2: ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein (Spike-RBDN318-V510) expressed in Escherichia coli

    Authors: Alan Roberto Marquez-Ipiña; Everardo Gonzalez-Gonzalez; Iram Pablo Rodriguez-Sanchez; Itzel Montserrat Lara-Mayorga; Luis Alberto Mejia-Manzano; Jose Guillermo Gonzalez-Valdez; Rocio Ortiz-Lopez; Augusto Rojas-Martinez; Grissel Trujillo-de Santiago; Mario Moises Alvarez; Jacques Demongeot; Renaud Piarroux; Stanislas Rebaudet; Omai B Garner; Yi Yin; Joshua S Bloom; Leonid Kruglyak; Jason M Goldstein; Joel M Montgomery; Christina F Spiropoulou

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20195503 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Massive worldwide serological testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 is needed to determine the extent of virus exposure in a particular region, the ratio of symptomatic to asymptomatic TRANS infected persons, and the duration and extent of immunity after infection MESHD. To achieve this aim, the development and production of reliable and cost-effective SARS-CoV-2 antigens is critical. Here, we report the bacterial production of the peptide S-RBDN318-V510, which contains the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We purified this peptide using a straightforward approach involving bacterial lysis, his-tag mediated affinity chromatography, and imidazole-assisted refolding. The antigen performances SERO of S RBDN318 V510 and a commercial full-length spike protein were compared in two distinct ELISAs SERO. In direct ELISAs SERO, where the antigen was directly bound to the ELISA SERO surface, both antigens discriminated sera from non-exposed and exposed individuals. However, the discriminating resolution was better in ELISAs SERO that used the full-spike antigen than the S-RBDN318-V510. Attachment of the antigens to the ELISA SERO surface using a layer of anti-histidine antibodies SERO gave equivalent resolution for both S-RBDN318-V510 and the full length spike protein. Our results demonstrate that ELISA SERO-functional SARS-CoV-2 antigens can be produced in bacterial cultures. S-RBDN318-V510 is amenable to massive production and may represent a cost-effective alternative to the use of structurally more complex antigens in serological COVID-19 testing.

    Meta-analysis of the clinical performance SERO of commercial SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid, antigen and antibody tests SERO up to 22 August 2020

    Authors: Ivo Van Walle; Katrin Leitmeyer; Eeva K Broberg; - The European COVID-19 microbiological laboratories group; Jaime Nieto-Zermeno; Juan Garduno-Espiosa; MARIA F CASTILLA-PEON; Javed Akram; Ravi K Amaravadi; Derek C Angus; Yaseen M Arabi; Shehnoor Azhar; Lindsey R Baden; Arthur W Baker; Leila Belkhir; Thomas Benfield; Marvin A H Berrevoets; Cheng-Pin Chen; Tsung-Chia Chen; Shu-Hsing Cheng; Chien-Yu Cheng; Wei-Sheng Chung; Yehuda Z Cohen; Lisa N Cowan; Olav Dalgard; Fernando F de Almeida e Val; Marcus V G de Lacerda; Gisely C de Melo; Lennie Derde; Vincent Dubee; Anissa Elfakir; Anthony C Gordon; Carmen M Hernandez-Cardenas; Thomas Hills; Andy I M Hoepelman; Yi-Wen Huang; Bruno Igau; Ronghua Jin; Felipe Jurado-Camacho; Khalid S Khan; Peter G Kremsner; Benno Kreuels; Cheng-Yu Kuo; Thuy Le; Yi-Chun Lin; Wu-Pu Lin; Tse-Hung Lin; Magnus Nakrem Lyngbakken; Colin McArthur; Bryan McVerry; Patricia Meza-Meneses; Wuelton M Monteiro; Susan C Morpeth; Ahmad Mourad; Mark J Mulligan; Srinivas Murthy; Susanna Naggie; Shanti Narayanasamy; Alistair Nichol; Lewis A Novack; Sean M O'Brien; Nwora Lance Okeke; Lena Perez; Rogelio Perez-Padilla; Laurent Perrin; Arantxa Remigio-Luna; Norma E Rivera-Martinez; Frank W Rockhold; Sebastian Rodriguez-Llamazares; Robert Rolfe; Rossana Rosa; Helge Rosjo; Vanderson S Sampaio; Todd B Seto; Muhammad Shehzad; Shaimaa Soliman; Jason E Stout; Ireri Thirion-Romero; Andrea B Troxel; Ting-Yu Tseng; Nicholas A Turner; Robert J Ulrich; Stephen R Walsh; Steve A Webb; Jesper M Weehuizen; Maria Velinova; Hon-Lai Wong; Rebekah Wrenn; Fernando G Zampieri; Wu Zhong; David Moher; Steven N Goodman; John P A Ioannidis; Lars G Hemkens

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195917 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    We reviewed the clinical performance SERO of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid, viral antigen and antibody tests SERO based on 94739 test results from 157 published studies and 20205 new test results from 12 EU/EEA Member States. Pooling the results and considering only results with 95% confidence interval width [≤]5%, we found 4 nucleic acid tests, among which 1 point of care test, and 3 antibody tests SERO with a clinical sensitivity SERO [≤]95% for at least one target population (hospitalised, mild or asymptomatic TRANS, or unknown). Analogously, 9 nucleic acid tests and 25 antibody tests SERO, among which 12 point of care tests, had a clinical specificity of [≤]98%. Three antibody tests SERO achieved both thresholds. Evidence for nucleic acid and antigen point of care tests remains scarce at present, and sensitivity SERO varied substantially. Study heterogeneity was low for 8/14 (57.1%) sensitivity SERO and 68/84 (81.0%) specificity results with confidence interval width [≤]5%, and lower for nucleic acid tests than antibody SERO tests. Manufacturer reported clinical performance SERO was significantly higher than independently assessed in 11/32 (34.4%) and 4/34 (11.8%) cases for sensitivity SERO and specificity respectively, indicating a need for improvement in this area. Continuous monitoring of clinical performance SERO within more clearly defined target populations is needed.

    An ELISA SERO protocol with resolution at high sample concentration reveals reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in unexposed individuals

    Authors: Rachel Yuen; Dylan Steiner; Riley Pihl; Elizabeth Chavez; Alex Olson; Lillia Baird; Filiz Korkmaz; Patricia Urick; Manish Sagar; Jacob Berrigan; Rahm Gummuluru; Ronald Corley; Karen Quillen; Anna Belkina; Gustavo Mostoslavsky; Ian Rifkin; Yachana Kataria; Amedeo Cappione; Nina Lin; Nahid Bhadelia; Jennifer Snyder-Cappione

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20192765 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted work, economy, and way of life. The SARS-CoV-2 virus displays unique features including widely varying symptoms and outcomes between infected individuals. Sensitive measurement of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies SERO would provide new insight into virus transmission TRANS dynamics, pre-existing cross-reactive immunity, and the nuances of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. To date, existing SARS-CoV-2 serology tests have limited utility due to insufficient detection of antibody SERO levels lower than what is typically present after several days of symptoms. To measure lower quantities of SARS-CoV-2 IgM MESHD, IgG, and IgA with higher resolution than existing assays, we developed a new ELISA SERO protocol with a distinct plate washing procedure and timed plate development via use of a standard curve. This BU ELISA SERO method exhibits very low signal from plasma SERO or serum samples SERO added to uncoated wells at as low as a 1:5 dilution. Use of this method revealed circulating SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD) and nucleocapsid protein (NP) reactive antibodies SERO from blood SERO samples drawn prior to May 2019. Of our pre-pandemic cohort, no SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive IgG antibodies SERO were detected in subjects over 70 years of age TRANS, and SARS-CoV-2 NP-reactive antibodies SERO were present at similar levels to infected subjects in some individuals and very low in others. Also, samples drawn in May 2020 from two individuals with no symptoms or no known virus exposure contained SARS-CoV-2 RBD-reactive antibodies SERO at intermediate amounts compared with other subject groups (higher than pre-pandemic and lower than confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infected MESHD). The one asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 convalescent subject in our study possessed comparable amounts of SARS-CoV-2 NP-specific IgM and IgG but drastically lower IgA than the symptomatic counterparts. Also, our assay detected positive signal from samples that gave negative results in a commercially available Lateral Flow Device (LFD) and the EUA approved Abbott IgG chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO detection. We propose that this improved ELISA SERO protocol, which is straightforward to perform, low cost, and uses readily available commercial reagents, is a useful tool to elucidate new information about SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and has promising implications for improved detection of all analytes measurable by this platform.

    High-throughput quantitation of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in a single-dilution homogeneous assay

    Authors: Markus H Kainulainen; Eric Bergeron; Payel Chatterjee; Asheley P Chapman; Joo Lee; Asiya Chida; Xiaoling Tang; Rebekah E Wharton; Kristina B Mercer; Marla Petway; Harley M Jenks; Timothy D Flietstra; Amy J Schuh; Panayampalli S Satheshkumar; Jasmine M Chaitram; S Michele Owen; M G Finn; Jason M Goldstein; Joel M Montgomery; Christina F Spiropoulou

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195446 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019 and has since spread around the world, causing a pandemic of the respiratory disease COVID-19. Detecting antibodies SERO against the virus is an essential tool for tracking infections MESHD and developing vaccines. Such tests, primarily utilizing the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO) principle, can be either qualitative (reporting positive/negative results) or quantitative (reporting a value representing the quantity of specific antibodies SERO). Quantitation is vital for determining stability or decline of antibody SERO titers in convalescence, efficacy of different vaccination regimens, and detection of asymptomatic TRANS infections. Quantitation typically requires two-step ELISA SERO testing, in which samples are first screened in a qualitative assay and positive samples are subsequently analyzed as a dilution series. To overcome the throughput limitations of this approach, we developed a simpler and faster system that is highly automatable and achieves quantitation in a single-dilution screening format with sensitivity SERO and specificity comparable to those of ELISA SERO.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in Tbilisi, the capital city of country of Georgia

    Authors: Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Lana Gatserelia; Marine Mirziashvili; Natia Dvali; Akaki Abutidze; Revaz Metchurtchlishvili; Carlos del Rio; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Alic Peuker; Gabriele Schoenhammer; Johanna Raithel; Dirk Lunz; Bernhard Graf; Florian Geismann; Matthias Lubnow; Matthias Mack; Peter Hau; Christopher Bohr; Ralph Burkhardt; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Frank Hanses; Florian Hitzenbichler; Daniel Heudobler; Florian Lueke; Tobias Pukrop; Wolfgang Herr; Daniel Wolff; Hendrik Poeck; Christoph Brochhausen; Petra Hoffmann; Michael Rehli; Marina Kreutz; Kathrin Renner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20195024 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Georgia timely implemented effective response measures, with testing, contact tracing TRANS and isolation being the main pillar of the national response, achieving the lowest cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the European region. Methods: We conducted a survey to estimate SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO among adult TRANS residents of capital city of Tbilisi ( adult TRANS population: 859,328). Participants were recruited through respondent driven sampling during May 18-27, 2020. Blood SERO specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO using commercially available lateral flow immunoassay SERO (COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette, Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech). Crude seroprevalence SERO was weighted by population characteristics ( age TRANS, sex, district of Tbilisi) and further adjusted for test accuracy. Results: Among 1,068 adults TRANS recruited 963 (90.2%) were between 18 and 64 years-old, 682 (63.9%) women. 176 (16.5%) reported symptoms indicative of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD occurring in previous three months. Nine persons tested positive for IgG: crude seroprevalence SERO: 0.84%, (95% CI: 0.33%-1.59%), weighted seroprevalence SERO: 0.94% (95% CI: 0.37%-1.95%), weighted and adjusted for test accuracy: 1.02% (95% CI: 0.38%-2.18%). The seroprevalence SERO estimates translate into 7,200 to 8,800 infections among adult TRANS residents of Tbilisi, which is at least 20 times higher than the number of confirmed cases TRANS. Conclusions: Low seroprevalence SERO confirms that Georgia successfully contained spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of pandemic. Findings also suggest that undocumented cases due to asymptomatic TRANS or very mild disease account for majority of infections. Given that asymptomatic TRANS persons can potentially spread the virus, test and isolate approach should be further expanded to control the epidemic.

    Serial SARS-CoV-2 Seropravelence Studies in Delhi July-August 2020: Indications of Pre-existing Cross-reactive Antibodies SERO and Implications for Disease Progression

    Authors: Smarajit Dey

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-80259/v1 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: ResearchSquare

    Two seropravelence studies were undertaken in Delhi, the city-state capital of India, in July-August 2020, exactly one month apart, to test for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Virus-tested (mostly RT-PCR) caseloads corresponding to these surveys, as of 13 days earlier to ensure antibody SERO generation, were compared. The survey conducted June 26-July 10 (sample size 21387) showed 23.48% seropravelence, (extrapolated to 4.48 mn of Delhi population of 19.1 mn), which was 79-times higher than corresponding virus-tested positives totaling 56746. Survey conducted August 1-7 (15311 samples) showed 29.1% antibody SERO-positive (5.56 mn population), and was 44x of virus-tested positive total of 125096. Pointing out that all serological surveys world-over have shown antibody SERO-positives to be higher than virus-test positives by multiples 7x to 80x, this study seeks to examine why the multiple should decline so drastically in one month, from 79x to 44x. Statistical adjustments were performed for Sampling Error and Sensitivity SERO/Specificity of the diagnostic kits. Indigenously developed COVID KAVACH ELISA SERO tests for IgG antibodies SERO to the SARS-CoV-2 virus were used for the surveys. Significantly, statistical adjustments were also done to account for the Testing Volumes and (Spot) Positivity rates at the two different times. [Spot Positivity is defined in the study and is the closest estimate of current or fresh positivity.] After all statistical revisions, the antibody SERO-positive to virus-test positive multiples stood at 53x and 37x for the two surveys. Calculating across the two sets of data, and other sensitivity SERO analysis, the study indicates that there is a significant proportion of pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies SERO (possibly to the HCoV viruses), that are seropositive in SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests, to the extent of 16%-19% of the population. The study also infers that there is an Amplification Factor of 15 in the Delhi serostudies: ie, each virus-test positive represents 14 more who are possibly asymptomatic TRANS and untested. The study forecasts a seropravelence 31%-34% for the 3rd serial serosurvey scheduled in September, whose results expected 22nd September. Limitations of the study are discussed, notably the absence of any research paper on the survey techniques, antibody testing SERO controversies, and the statistical adjustment for Testing Volumes. The study discusses how Chain-of-Transmission TRANS protocols and Decreasing Susceptible Population work in unison to slow down a pandemic, and analyses the disease progression graph of Delhi in that context. The implications of 16%-19% pre-existing antibodies SERO on disease progression in Delhi are discussed. 

    Sero-surveillance (IgG) of SARS-CoV-2 among Asymptomatic TRANS General population of Paschim Medinipur District, West Bengal, India(Conducted during last week of July and 1st week of August 2020) - A Joint Venture of VRDL Lab (ICMR), Midnapore Medical College & Hospital & Department of Health and Family Welfare,Govt. of West Bengal, Paschim Medinipur

    Authors: Parthasarathi Satpati; Saumya Sankar Sarangi; Kripasindhu Gantait; Sayantani Endow; Nimai Chandra Mandal; Panchanan Kundu; Subhadip Bhunia; Soham Sarangi; Vladimir Volynkin; Hermann Zellner; Rengul Cetin-Atalay; Maria Martin; Volkan Atalay; Makoto Miyara; Guy Gorochov; Amelie Guihot; Christophe Combadiere; Duraipandian Thavaselvam; Devendra Kumar Dubey; Paul Lin; Hila Shaim; Sean G Yates; David Marin; Indreshpal Kaur; Sheetal Rao; Duncan Mak; Angelique Lin; Qi Miao; Jinzhuang Dou; Ken Chen; Richard Champlin; Elizabeth J Shpall; Katayoun Rezvani

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.12.20193219 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a pandemic, and the infection MESHD due to SARS-CoV-2 has now spread to more than 200 countries . Surveillance systems form the foundation stone of active case finding, testing and contact tracing TRANS, which are the key components of the public health response to this novel, emerging infectious disease MESHD . There is uncertainty about the true proportion of patients who remain asymptomatic TRANS or pre-symptomatic at a given time. As per the WHO-China Joint Monitoring Mission Report, and an analysis of 21 published reports, anywhere between 5 and 80 per cent of SARS CoV 2 infected MESHD patients have been noted to be asymptomatic TRANS. Whereas in India 4197563 cases are positive, in which in West Bengal total 180788 cases (4.04% of Cases of India) positive of COVID 19. In Paschim Medinipur (West Medinipur) district contributing total 5489 cases (3.03% cases of West Bengal). In this scenario, we want to know the status of IgG seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV 2 among asymptomatic TRANS general population, so that we can determine the extent of infection of SARS CoV MESHD 2 in general population. Objectives: Primary Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD in the general asymptomatic TRANS population at Paschim Medinipur District. Secondary Objectives: To estimate age TRANS and sex specific seroprevalence SERO. To determine the socio demographic risk factors for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD; To determine the other risk factors like comorbidities, vaccination status, travel TRANS history, contact history etc.; To determine the durability of Immunity (IgG) conferred by natural infection of SARS-CoV-2 MESHD in individuals previously RTPCR positive. Methodology: It was a cross sectional 30 cluster study among the population of Paschim Medinipur district of West Bengal conducted in last week of July and 1st week of August 2020 among 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population and 30 RTPCR positive cases in 30 villages or wards of municipalities. 30 clusters were chosen from list of COVID 19 affected villages/wards of municipality as per PPS (Probability Proportional to Size) method. Results: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS CoV 2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Among risk factors, the risk of having IgG is more in persons having Travel TRANS history with odds ratio of 2.99- 95%CI (1.17-7.65) with p-value- 0.02. Hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis with Odds ratio of 8.49- 95% CI(1.59-45.19) with p value - 0.003. Occupation as migrant labour with Odds ratio of 5.08- 95% CI(1.96-13.18) with p value of 0.001. H/O Chicken pox with Odds ratio of 2.15- 95% CI(0.59-7.79) with p value of 0.017. Influenza vaccinated with Odds ratio of 8.07 with 95% CI (0.8-81.48) with a p value of 0.036. Conclusion: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS-CoV-2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Those having Travel TRANS History and having occupation MESHD as Migrant Labourer have significantly higher probability of getting infected with SARS-CoV-2. No role has been found of Hydroxychloroquine Medicines as Chemoprophylactic. No durable immunity conferred by natural infection with SARS-CoV-2 mean time to become seronegative after positive RTPCR test 60 days. So there is a chance of reinfection after average 2 months.

    Robust SARS-COV-2 serological population screens via multi-antigen rules-based approach

    Authors: Christos F Fotis; Nikolaos Meimetis; Nikos Tsolakos; Marianna Politou; Karolina Akinosoglou; Vicky Pliaka; Angeliki Minia; Evangelos Terpos; Ioannis P. Trougakos; Andreas Mentis; Markos Marangos; George Panayiotakopoulos; Meletios A. Dimopoulos; Charalampos Gogos; Alexandros Spyridonidis; Leonidas G. Alexopoulos

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191122 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: medRxiv

    More than 300 SARS-COV-2 serological tests SERO have recently been developed using either the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), the spike glycoprotein subunit (S1), and more recently the receptor binding domain (RBD). Most of the assays report very good clinical performance SERO characteristics in well-controlled clinical settings. However, there is a growing belief that good performance SERO characteristics that are obtained during clinical performance SERO trials might not be sufficient to deliver good diagnostic results in population-wide screens that are usually characterized with low seroprevalence SERO. In this paper, we developed a serological assay SERO against N, S1 and RBD using a bead-based multiplex platform and a rules-based computational approach to assess the performance SERO of single and multi-antigen readouts in well-defined clinical samples and in a population-wide serosurvey from blood SERO donors. Even though assays based on single antigen readouts performed similarly well in the clinical samples, there was a striking difference between the antigens on the population-wide screen. Asymptomatic TRANS individuals with low antibody SERO titers and sub-optimal assay specificity might contribute to the large discrepancies in population studies with low seroprevalence SERO. A multi-antigen assay requiring partial agreement between RBD, N and S1 readouts exhibited enhanced specificity, less dependency on assay cut-off values and an overall more robust performance SERO in both sample settings. Our data suggest that assays based on multiple antigen readouts combined with a rules-based computational consensus can provide a more robust platform for routine antibody SERO screening.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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