Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Anosmia (3)

Fever (3)

Dyspnea (1)

Pneumonia (1)

Leukopenia (1)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Seroprevalence SERO of immunoglobulin M and G antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in ophthalmic patients

    Authors: shengjie li Sr.; yichao qiu; li tang; zhujian wang; wenjun cao; gezhi xu; xinghuai sun; Philippa C Matthews; Jienchi Dorward; Bernhard Graf; Florian Hitzenbichler; Frank Hanses; Hendrik Poeck; Marina Kreutz; Evelyn Orso; Ralph Burkhardt; Tanja Niedermair; Christoph Brochhausen; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Matthias Mack; Christine Goffinet; Florian Kurth; Martin Witzenrath; Maria Theresa Völker; Sarah Dorothea Müller; Uwe Gerd Liebert; Naveed Ishaque; Lars Kaderali; Leif Erik Sander; Sven Laudi; Christian Drosten; Roland Eils; Christian Conrad; Ulf Landmesser; Irina Lehmann

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.22.20198465 Date: 2020-09-23 Source: medRxiv

    Using serological test SERO to estimate the prevalence SERO and infection potential of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 in ocular diseases MESHD patients help understand the relationship between ocular diseases MESHD and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD. We conducted a cross-sectional study assaying the IgG and IgM antibodies SERO in 1331 individuals with ocular diseases MESHD by using a magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay SERO kit, during the period from February 2020 to May 2020. In our study, the seroposivity in total ocular disease MESHD patients was 0.83% (11/1331). The patients with different ocular diseases MESHD including xerophthalmia MESHD, keratitis HP keratitis MESHD, conjunctival cyst, cataract HP cataract MESHD, glaucoma HP glaucoma MESHD, refractive error, strabismus HP and others had seroposivity of 2.94%, 12.5%, 25%, 4.41%, 2.63%, 1.6%, 2.22% and 0%, respectively. Among that, two ocular surface disease groups ( keratitis HP keratitis MESHD and conjunctival cyst) had higher seroprevalence SERO compared with others. All the participants were reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction negative for SARS-CoV-2 from throat swabs. Our study evaluated the seroprevalence SERO in patients with different ocular diseases MESHD, which will help us understand the relationship between ocular disease MESHD and SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Furthermore, the serological test SERO for the presence of IgM and/or IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 might provide accurate estimate of the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in patients with ocular diseases MESHD.

    SARS-CoV-2 antigen and antibody SERO prevalence SERO among UK staff working with cancer MESHD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Authors: David M Favara; Karen McAdam; Anthony Cooke; Alex Bordessa-Kelly; Ieva Budriunaite; Sophie Bossingham; Sally Houghton; Rainer Doffinger; Nicola Ainsworth; Pippa Corrie; Yimin Tong; Jin Zhong; Youhua Xie; Xinquan Wang; Zhenghong Yuan; Dongming Zhou; Rong Zhang; Qiang Ding; Kristen J Brennand; Katherine H Hullsiek; David R Boulware; SARAH M LOFGREN; Martirene A da Silva; Brian Custer; Manoel Barral-Netto; Moritz Kraemer; Rafael HM Pererira; Oliver G Pybus; Michael P Busch; Márcia C Castro; Christopher Dye; Vitor H Nascimento; Nuno R Faria; Ester C Sabino

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20197590 Date: 2020-09-20 Source: medRxiv

    Background International guidelines for testing potentially immunosuppressed cancer MESHD patients receiving non-surgical anticancer therapies for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) are currently lacking. The value of routinely testing staff treating cancer MESHD patients is not known. Methods: Patient-facing oncology department staff at work during the COVID-19 pandemic consented to have a nasopharyngeal swab SARS-CoV-2 antigen test by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and blood SERO tests for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO using a laboratory Luminex-based assay and a rapid point-of-care (POC) assay on 2 occasions 28 days apart in June and July 2020. Results 434 participants were recruited: nurses (58.3%), doctors (21.2%), radiographers (10.4%) and administrators (10.1%). 82% were female TRANS; median age TRANS 40-years (range 19-66). 26.3% reported prior symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and 1.4% tested PCR-positive prior to June 2020. All were PCR-negative at both study day 1 and 28. 18.4% were SARS-CoV-2 sero-positive on day 1 by Luminex, of whom 42.5% also tested positive by POC. 47.5% of Luminex sero-positives had antibodies SERO to both nucleocapsid (N) and surface (S) antigens. Nurses (21.3%) and doctors (17.4%) had higher prevalence SERO trends of Luminex sero-positivity compared with administrators (13.6%) and radiographers (8.9%) (p=0.2). 38% of sero-positive participants reported previous symptoms suggestive of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, a 1.9-fold higher odds than sero-negative participants (p=0.01). 400 participants re-tested on day 28: 13.3% were Luminex sero-positive of whom 92.5% were previously positive and 7.5% newly positive. Nurses (16.5%) had the highest seroprevalence SERO trend amongst staff groups (p=0.07). 32.5% of day 1 sero-positives became sero-negative by day 28: the majority being previously reactive to the N-antigen only (p<0.0001). Conclusion The high prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 IgG sero-positivity in oncology nurses, and the high decline of positivity over 4 weeks supports regular antigen and antibody testing SERO in this staff group for SARS-CoV-2 as part of routine patient care prior to availability of a vaccine.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 among adults TRANS in three regions of France following the lockdown and associated risk factors: a multicohort study.

    Authors: Fabrice Carrat; Xavier de Lamballerie; Delphine Rahib; Helene Blanche; Nathanael Lapidus; Fanny Artaud; Sofiane Kab; Adeline Renuy; Fabien Szabo de Edelenyi; Laurence Meyer; Nathalie Lydie; Marie-Aline Charles; Pierre-Yves Ancel; Florence Jusot; Alexandra Rouquette; Stephane Priet; Paola M Saba Villaroel; Toscane Fourie; Clovis Lusivika-Nzinga; Jerome Nicol; Stephane Legot; Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo; Younes Essedik; Cindy Lai; Jean-Marie Gagliolo; Jean-Francois Deleuze; Nathalie Bajos; Gianluca Severi; Mathilde Touvier; Marie Zins

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.16.20195693 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Aim To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in May-June 2020 after the lockdown in adults TRANS living in three regions in France and to identify the associated risk factors. Methods Participants in a survey on COVID-19 from an existing consortium of three general adult TRANS population cohorts living in the Ile-de-France (IDF) or Grand Est (GE), two regions with high rate of COVID-19, or in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine (NA), with a low rate, were asked to take a dried- blood SERO spot (DBS) for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO assessment. The primary outcome was a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 ELISA IgG SERO result against the spike protein of the virus ( ELISA SERO-S). The secondary outcomes were a positive ELISA IgG SERO against the nucleocapsid protein ( ELISA SERO-NP), anti- SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO titers >=40 (SN), and predicted positivity obtained from a multiple imputation model ( MI MESHD). Prevalence SERO estimates were adjusted using sampling weights and post-stratification methods. Findings Between May 4, 2020 and June 23, 2020, 16,000 participants were asked to provide DBS, and 14,628 were included in the analysis, 983 with a positive ELISA SERO-S, 511 with a positive ELISA SERO-NP, 424 with SN>=40 and 941 (Standard Deviation=31) with a positive MI MESHD. Adjusted estimates of seroprevalence SERO (positive ELISA SERO-S) were 10.0% (95%CI 9.1%;10.9%) in IDF, 9.0% (95%CI 7.7%; 10.2%) in GE and 3.1% (95%CI 2.4%; 3.7%), in NA. The adjusted prevalence SERO of positive ELISA SERO-NP, SN and MI MESHD were 5.7%, 5.0% and 10.0% in IDF, 6.0%, 4.3% and 8.6% in GE, and 0.6%, 1.3% and 2.5% in NA, respectively. A higher seroprevalence SERO was observed in younger participants and when at least one child TRANS or adolescent lived in the same household. A lower seroprevalence SERO was observed in smokers compared to non-smokers. Interpretation At the end of the lockdown the prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG or neutralizing antibodies SERO remained low in the French adult TRANS population, even in regions with high reported rates of COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in Tbilisi, the capital city of country of Georgia

    Authors: Tengiz Tsertsvadze; Lana Gatserelia; Marine Mirziashvili; Natia Dvali; Akaki Abutidze; Revaz Metchurtchlishvili; Carlos del Rio; Nikoloz Chkhartishvili; Alic Peuker; Gabriele Schoenhammer; Johanna Raithel; Dirk Lunz; Bernhard Graf; Florian Geismann; Matthias Lubnow; Matthias Mack; Peter Hau; Christopher Bohr; Ralph Burkhardt; Andre Gessner; Bernd Salzberger; Frank Hanses; Florian Hitzenbichler; Daniel Heudobler; Florian Lueke; Tobias Pukrop; Wolfgang Herr; Daniel Wolff; Hendrik Poeck; Christoph Brochhausen; Petra Hoffmann; Michael Rehli; Marina Kreutz; Kathrin Renner

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.18.20195024 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Georgia timely implemented effective response measures, with testing, contact tracing TRANS and isolation being the main pillar of the national response, achieving the lowest cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the European region. Methods: We conducted a survey to estimate SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO among adult TRANS residents of capital city of Tbilisi ( adult TRANS population: 859,328). Participants were recruited through respondent driven sampling during May 18-27, 2020. Blood SERO specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO using commercially available lateral flow immunoassay SERO (COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette, Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech). Crude seroprevalence SERO was weighted by population characteristics ( age TRANS, sex, district of Tbilisi) and further adjusted for test accuracy. Results: Among 1,068 adults TRANS recruited 963 (90.2%) were between 18 and 64 years-old, 682 (63.9%) women. 176 (16.5%) reported symptoms indicative of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD occurring in previous three months. Nine persons tested positive for IgG: crude seroprevalence SERO: 0.84%, (95% CI: 0.33%-1.59%), weighted seroprevalence SERO: 0.94% (95% CI: 0.37%-1.95%), weighted and adjusted for test accuracy: 1.02% (95% CI: 0.38%-2.18%). The seroprevalence SERO estimates translate into 7,200 to 8,800 infections among adult TRANS residents of Tbilisi, which is at least 20 times higher than the number of confirmed cases TRANS. Conclusions: Low seroprevalence SERO confirms that Georgia successfully contained spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the first wave of pandemic. Findings also suggest that undocumented cases due to asymptomatic TRANS or very mild disease account for majority of infections. Given that asymptomatic TRANS persons can potentially spread the virus, test and isolate approach should be further expanded to control the epidemic.

    Early Release Estimates for SARS-CoV-2 Prevalence SERO and Antibody SERO Response Interim Weighting for Probability-Based Sample Surveys

    Authors: Heather Bradley; Mansour Fahimi; Travis Sanchez; Ben Lopman; Martin Frankel; Colleen Kelley; Richard Rothenberg; Aaron J Siegler; Patrick S Sullivan; Md. Nur Islam; Newaz Mohammed Bahadur; Md. Didar ul Alam; Hasan Mahmud Reza; Md. Jakariya

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20195099 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Many months into the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, basic epidemiologic parameters describing burden of disease are lacking. To reduce selection bias in current burden of disease estimates derived from diagnostic testing data or serologic testing SERO in convenience samples, we are conducting a national probability-based sample SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey. Sampling from a national address-based frame and using mailed recruitment materials and test kits will allow us to estimate national prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and antibodies SERO, overall and by demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics. Data will be weighted for unequal selection probabilities and non-response and will be adjusted to population benchmarks. Due to the urgent need for these estimates, expedited interim weighting of serosurvey responses will be undertaken to produce early release estimates, which will be published on the study website, COVIDVu.org. Here, we describe a process for computing interim survey weights and guidelines for release of interim estimates.

    COVID-19 Case- Age TRANS Distribution: Correction for Differential Testing by Age TRANS

    Authors: David Fisman; Amy Greer; Michael Hillmer; Sheila O'Brien; Steven J. Drews; Ashleigh Tuite; Dora Bordoni; Jeanette Franzenburg; Ulf Geisen; Jonathan Josephs-Spaulding; Philipp Koehler; Axel Kuenstner; Elisa Rosati; Anna C. Aschenbrenner; Petra Bacher; Nathan Baran; Teide Boysen; Burkhard Brandt; Niklas Bruse; Jonathan Doerr; Andreas Draeger; Gunnar Elke; David Ellinghaus; Julia Fischer; Michael Forster; Andre Franke; Soeren Franzenburg; Norbert Frey; Anette Friedrichs; Janina Fuss; Andreas Glueck; Jacob Hamm; Finn Hinrichsen; Marc P. Hoeppner; Simon Imm; Ralf Juenker; Sina Kaiser; Ying H. Kan; Rainer Knoll; Christoph Lange; Georg Laue; Clemes Lier; Matthias Lindner; Georgios Marinos; Robert Markewitz; Jacob Nattermann; Rainer Noth; Peter Pickkers; Klaus F. Rabe; Alina Renz; Christoph Roecken; Jan Rupp; Annika Schaffarzyk; Alexander Scheffold; Jonas Schulte-Schrepping; Domagoj Schunck; Dirk Skowasch; Thomas Ulas; Klaus-Peter Wandinger; Michael Wittig; Johannes Zimmermann; Hauke Busch; Bimba F. Hoyer; Christoph Kaleta; Jan Heyckendorf; Matthijs Kox; Jan Rybniker; Stefan Schreiber; Joachim Schultze; Philip Rosenstiel; - HCA Lung Biological Network; - Deutsche COVID-19 Omics Initiative (DeCOI)

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20193862 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Background: SARS-CoV-2 is a novel pathogen and is currently the cause of a global pandemic. Despite expected universal susceptibility to a novel pathogen, the pandemic to date has been characterized by higher observed incidence in the oldest individuals and lower incidence in children TRANS and adolescents. Differential testing by age group TRANS may explain some of these observed differences, but datasets linking case counts to public health testing volumes are uncommon. Methods: We used data from Ontario, Canada. Case data were obtained from Ontarios provincial line, while testing data were obtained from an information system with complete SARS-CoV-2 testing data for public, hospital, and private laboratories. Demographic and temporal patterns in reported case incidence, testing rates, and test positivity were explored using negative binomial regression models. Standardized morbidity and testing ratios (SMR, STR), and standardized test positivity (STP) were calculated by dividing age TRANS- and sex-specific rates by overall rates; demographic and temporal patterns in standardized ratios were explored using meta-regression. Testing adjusted SMR were estimated using linear regression models. Results: Observed disease incidence and testing rates were highest in oldest individuals and markedly lower in those aged TRANS < 20. Temporal trends in disease incidence and testing were observed, but standardizing morbidity and testing ratios eliminated temporal trends (i.e., relative patterns by age TRANS and sex remained identical regardless of epidemic phase). After adjustment for testing frequency, SMR were lowest in children TRANS and adults TRANS aged TRANS 70 and older, approximately the same in adolescents as in the population as a whole and elevated in young adults TRANS ( aged TRANS 20-29 years), providing a markedly different picture of the epidemic than seen with crude SMR or case-based incidence. Test-adjusted SMR were validated using seroprevalence SERO data (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.82, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is typically performed using only test-positive case data, without adjustment for testing frequency. Older adults TRANS are tested more frequently, likely due to increased disease severity, while children TRANS are under-tested. Adjustment for testing frequency results in a very different picture of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD infection risk TRANS infection risk TRANS by age TRANS, one that is consistent with estimates obtained through serological testing SERO.

    Sero-surveillance (IgG) of SARS-CoV-2 among Asymptomatic TRANS General population of Paschim Medinipur District, West Bengal, India(Conducted during last week of July and 1st week of August 2020) - A Joint Venture of VRDL Lab (ICMR), Midnapore Medical College & Hospital & Department of Health and Family Welfare,Govt. of West Bengal, Paschim Medinipur

    Authors: Parthasarathi Satpati; Saumya Sankar Sarangi; Kripasindhu Gantait; Sayantani Endow; Nimai Chandra Mandal; Panchanan Kundu; Subhadip Bhunia; Soham Sarangi; Vladimir Volynkin; Hermann Zellner; Rengul Cetin-Atalay; Maria Martin; Volkan Atalay; Makoto Miyara; Guy Gorochov; Amelie Guihot; Christophe Combadiere; Duraipandian Thavaselvam; Devendra Kumar Dubey; Paul Lin; Hila Shaim; Sean G Yates; David Marin; Indreshpal Kaur; Sheetal Rao; Duncan Mak; Angelique Lin; Qi Miao; Jinzhuang Dou; Ken Chen; Richard Champlin; Elizabeth J Shpall; Katayoun Rezvani

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.12.20193219 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a pandemic, and the infection MESHD due to SARS-CoV-2 has now spread to more than 200 countries . Surveillance systems form the foundation stone of active case finding, testing and contact tracing TRANS, which are the key components of the public health response to this novel, emerging infectious disease MESHD . There is uncertainty about the true proportion of patients who remain asymptomatic TRANS or pre-symptomatic at a given time. As per the WHO-China Joint Monitoring Mission Report, and an analysis of 21 published reports, anywhere between 5 and 80 per cent of SARS CoV 2 infected MESHD patients have been noted to be asymptomatic TRANS. Whereas in India 4197563 cases are positive, in which in West Bengal total 180788 cases (4.04% of Cases of India) positive of COVID 19. In Paschim Medinipur (West Medinipur) district contributing total 5489 cases (3.03% cases of West Bengal). In this scenario, we want to know the status of IgG seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV 2 among asymptomatic TRANS general population, so that we can determine the extent of infection of SARS CoV MESHD 2 in general population. Objectives: Primary Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD in the general asymptomatic TRANS population at Paschim Medinipur District. Secondary Objectives: To estimate age TRANS and sex specific seroprevalence SERO. To determine the socio demographic risk factors for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD; To determine the other risk factors like comorbidities, vaccination status, travel TRANS history, contact history etc.; To determine the durability of Immunity (IgG) conferred by natural infection of SARS-CoV-2 MESHD in individuals previously RTPCR positive. Methodology: It was a cross sectional 30 cluster study among the population of Paschim Medinipur district of West Bengal conducted in last week of July and 1st week of August 2020 among 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population and 30 RTPCR positive cases in 30 villages or wards of municipalities. 30 clusters were chosen from list of COVID 19 affected villages/wards of municipality as per PPS (Probability Proportional to Size) method. Results: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS CoV 2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Among risk factors, the risk of having IgG is more in persons having Travel TRANS history with odds ratio of 2.99- 95%CI (1.17-7.65) with p-value- 0.02. Hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis with Odds ratio of 8.49- 95% CI(1.59-45.19) with p value - 0.003. Occupation as migrant labour with Odds ratio of 5.08- 95% CI(1.96-13.18) with p value of 0.001. H/O Chicken pox with Odds ratio of 2.15- 95% CI(0.59-7.79) with p value of 0.017. Influenza vaccinated with Odds ratio of 8.07 with 95% CI (0.8-81.48) with a p value of 0.036. Conclusion: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS-CoV-2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Those having Travel TRANS History and having occupation MESHD as Migrant Labourer have significantly higher probability of getting infected with SARS-CoV-2. No role has been found of Hydroxychloroquine Medicines as Chemoprophylactic. No durable immunity conferred by natural infection with SARS-CoV-2 mean time to become seronegative after positive RTPCR test 60 days. So there is a chance of reinfection after average 2 months.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies SERO Among 925 Staff Members in an Urban Hospital Accepting COVID-19 Patients in Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Authors: Tsutomu Nishida; Hiromi Iwahashi; Kazuhiro Yamauchi; Noriko Kinoshita; Yukiyoshi Okauchi; Norihiro Suzuki; Masami Inada; Kinya Abe; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20191866 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD rate in hospitals during the pandemic remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of our hospital's current nosocomial infection control, we conducted a serological survey of the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO (immunoglobulin G) among the staff of our hospital, which is treating coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G in the participants using a laboratory-based quantitative test (Abbott immunoassay SERO), which has a sensitivity SERO and specificity of 100% and 99.6%, respectively. To investigate the factors associated with seropositivity, we also obtained some information from the participants with an anonymous questionnaire. Results: We invited 1133 staff members in our hospital, and 925 (82%) participated. The mean age TRANS of the participants was 40.0{+/-}11.8 years, and most were women (80.0%). According to job title, there were 149 medical doctors or dentists (16.0%), 489 nurses (52.9%), 140 medical technologists (14.2%), 49 healthcare providers (5.3%), and 98 administrative staff (10.5%). The overall prevalence SERO of seropositivity for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG was 0.43% (4/925), which was similar to the control seroprevalence SERO of 0.54% (16/2970)) in the general population in Osaka during the same period according to a government survey conducted with the same assay. Seropositive rates did not significantly differ according to job title, exposure to suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, or any other investigated factors. Conclusion: The subclinical SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rate in our hospital was not higher than that in the general population under our nosocomial infection MESHD control measures.

    Clinical Performance SERO Evaluation of a SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO for Determining Past Exposure to SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Peter Findeisen; Hugo Stiegler; Eloisa Lopez-Calle; Tanja Schneider; Eva Urlaub; Johannes Hayer; Claudia Silke Zemmrich

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20180687 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: medRxiv

    The true prevalence SERO and population seropositivity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD remains unknown, due to the number of asymptomatic TRANS infections MESHD and limited access to high- performance SERO antibody tests SERO. To control the COVID-19 pandemic it is crucial to understand the true seroprevalence SERO, but not every region has access to extensive centralized PCR and serology testing. Currently available rapid antibody tests SERO lack the accuracy needed for recommendation by health authorities. To fill this gap, we analyzed and validated the clinical performance SERO of a new point-of-care SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody SERO Assay, a chromatographic immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of IgM/IgG antibodies SERO for use in near-patient settings. Analysis was performed using 42 Anti-SARS-Cov-2 positive (CoV+) and 92 Anti-SARS-Covid-2 negative (CoV-) leftover samples from before December 2019, using the Elecsys(R) Anti-SARS-CoV-2 as the reference assay. Analytical specificity was tested using leftover samples from individuals with symptoms of common cold collected before December 2019. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO was 100.0% (95% CI 91.59-100.00) sensitive and 96.74% (95% CI 90.77-99.32) specific with an assay failure rate of 0.00%. No cross-reactivity was observed against the common cold panel. Method comparison was additionally conducted by two external laboratories, using 100 CoV+/275 CoV- samples, also comparing whole blood SERO versus plasma SERO matrix. The comparison demonstrated for plasma SERO 96.00% positive/96.36% negative percent agreement with the Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and overall 99.20% percent agreement between whole blood SERO and EDTA plasma SERO. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO demonstrated similar clinical performance SERO to the manufacturer's data and to a centralized automated immunoassay SERO, with no cross-reactivity to common cold panels.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar, northern India - a cross-sectional study

    Authors: S Muhammad Salim Khan; Mariya Amin Qurieshi; Inaamul Haq; Sabhiya Majid; Arif Akbar Bhat; Sahila Nabi; Nisar Ahmad Ganai; Nazia Zahoor; Auqfeen Nisar; Iqra Nisar Chowdri; Tanzeela Bashir Qazi; Rafiya Kousar; Abdul Aziz Lone; Iram Sabah; Shahroz Nabi; Ishtiyaq Ahmad Sumji; Misbah Ferooz Kawoosa; Shifana Ayoub; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Sezer Akyoney; Ilayda Sahin; Ugur Ozbek; Dilek Telci; Fikrettin Sahin; Koray Yalcin; Ercument Ovali

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.04.282640 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: bioRxiv

    BackgroundPrevalence of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD provides essential information for deciding disease prevention and mitigation measures. We estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar. Methods2906 persons >18 years of age TRANS selected from hospital visitors across District Srinagar participated in the study. We tested samples for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO-based serologic test SERO. ResultsAge- and gender TRANS-standardized seroprevalence SERO was 3.6% (95% CI 2.9% to 4.3%). Age TRANS 30-69 years, a recent history of symptoms of an influenza-like-illness, and a history of being placed under quarantine were significantly related to higher odds of the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO. The estimated number of SARS-CoV-2 infections during the two weeks preceding the study, adjusted for test performance SERO, was 32602 with an estimated (median) infection-to-known-case ratio of 46 (95% CI 36 to 57). ConclusionsThe seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO is low in the District. A large proportion of the population is still susceptible to the infection. A sizeable number of infections remain undetected, and a substantial proportion of people with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 are not tested.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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