Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (9)

Anosmia (6)

Cough (4)

Pneumonia (3)

Myalgia (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 174
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    Impact of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO at delivery in women, partners and newborns

    Authors: Pia Egerup; Line Fich Olsen; Ann-Marie Hellerung Christiansen; David Westergaard; Elin Rosenbek Severinsen; Kathrine Vauvert Roemmelmayer Hviid; Astrid Marie Kolte; Amalie Dyhrberg Boje; Marie-Louise Mathilde Friis Bertelsen; Lisbeth Praetorius; Anne Zedeler; Josefine Reinhardt Nielsen; Didi Bang; Sine Berntsen; Jeppe Ethelberg-Findsen; Ditte Marie Storm; Judith Bello-Rodriguez; Andreas Ingham; Joaquim Olle-Lopez; Eva Hoffmann; Charlotte Wilken-Jensen; Lone Krebs; Finn Stener Joergensen; Henrik Torkil Westh; Henrik Lovendahl Jorgensen; Nina la Cour Freiesleben; Henriette Svarre Nielsen

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.14.20191106 Date: 2020-09-15 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Only few studies have focused on serological testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 in pregnant women and no previous study has investigated the frequency in partners. The aim was to investigate the frequency and impact of SARS-CoV-2 in parturient women, their partners and newborns. Methods: From April 4th to July 3rd, 2020, all parturient women, their partners and newborns were invited to participate in the study. Participating women and partners had a pharyngeal swab and a blood SERO sample taken at admission and immediately after delivery a blood SERO sample was drawn from the umbilical cord. The swabs were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by PCR and the blood SERO samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Full medical history, obstetric- and neonatal information were available. Results: A total of 1,361 parturient women, 1,236 partners and 1,342 newborns participated in the study. No associations between previous COVID-19 disease and obstetric- or neonatal complications were found. The adjusted serological prevalence SERO was 2.9% in women and 3.8% in partners. The frequency of blood SERO type A was significantly higher in women with antibodies SERO compared to women without antibodies SERO. 17 newborns had SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, and none had IgM antibodies SERO. Full serological data from 1,052 families showed an absolute risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS of 0.37 if the partner had antibodies SERO. Only 55% of individuals with antibodies SERO reported symptoms. Conclusion: This large prospective cohort study reports no association between COVID-19 and obstetric- or neonatal complications. The family pattern showed a substantial increase in absolute risk for women living with a partner with antibodies SERO.

    Sero-surveillance (IgG) of SARS-CoV-2 among Asymptomatic TRANS General population of Paschim Medinipur District, West Bengal, India(Conducted during last week of July and 1st week of August 2020) - A Joint Venture of VRDL Lab (ICMR), Midnapore Medical College & Hospital & Department of Health and Family Welfare,Govt. of West Bengal, Paschim Medinipur

    Authors: Parthasarathi Satpati; Saumya Sankar Sarangi; Kripasindhu Gantait; Sayantani Endow; Nimai Chandra Mandal; Panchanan Kundu; Subhadip Bhunia; Soham Sarangi; Vladimir Volynkin; Hermann Zellner; Rengul Cetin-Atalay; Maria Martin; Volkan Atalay; Makoto Miyara; Guy Gorochov; Amelie Guihot; Christophe Combadiere; Duraipandian Thavaselvam; Devendra Kumar Dubey; Paul Lin; Hila Shaim; Sean G Yates; David Marin; Indreshpal Kaur; Sheetal Rao; Duncan Mak; Angelique Lin; Qi Miao; Jinzhuang Dou; Ken Chen; Richard Champlin; Elizabeth J Shpall; Katayoun Rezvani

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.12.20193219 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a pandemic, and the infection MESHD due to SARS-CoV-2 has now spread to more than 200 countries . Surveillance systems form the foundation stone of active case finding, testing and contact tracing TRANS, which are the key components of the public health response to this novel, emerging infectious disease MESHD . There is uncertainty about the true proportion of patients who remain asymptomatic TRANS or pre-symptomatic at a given time. As per the WHO-China Joint Monitoring Mission Report, and an analysis of 21 published reports, anywhere between 5 and 80 per cent of SARS CoV 2 infected MESHD patients have been noted to be asymptomatic TRANS. Whereas in India 4197563 cases are positive, in which in West Bengal total 180788 cases (4.04% of Cases of India) positive of COVID 19. In Paschim Medinipur (West Medinipur) district contributing total 5489 cases (3.03% cases of West Bengal). In this scenario, we want to know the status of IgG seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV 2 among asymptomatic TRANS general population, so that we can determine the extent of infection of SARS CoV MESHD 2 in general population. Objectives: Primary Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD in the general asymptomatic TRANS population at Paschim Medinipur District. Secondary Objectives: To estimate age TRANS and sex specific seroprevalence SERO. To determine the socio demographic risk factors for SARS CoV 2 infection MESHD; To determine the other risk factors like comorbidities, vaccination status, travel TRANS history, contact history etc.; To determine the durability of Immunity (IgG) conferred by natural infection of SARS-CoV-2 MESHD in individuals previously RTPCR positive. Methodology: It was a cross sectional 30 cluster study among the population of Paschim Medinipur district of West Bengal conducted in last week of July and 1st week of August 2020 among 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population and 30 RTPCR positive cases in 30 villages or wards of municipalities. 30 clusters were chosen from list of COVID 19 affected villages/wards of municipality as per PPS (Probability Proportional to Size) method. Results: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS CoV 2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Among risk factors, the risk of having IgG is more in persons having Travel TRANS history with odds ratio of 2.99- 95%CI (1.17-7.65) with p-value- 0.02. Hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis with Odds ratio of 8.49- 95% CI(1.59-45.19) with p value - 0.003. Occupation as migrant labour with Odds ratio of 5.08- 95% CI(1.96-13.18) with p value of 0.001. H/O Chicken pox with Odds ratio of 2.15- 95% CI(0.59-7.79) with p value of 0.017. Influenza vaccinated with Odds ratio of 8.07 with 95% CI (0.8-81.48) with a p value of 0.036. Conclusion: Of the 458 asymptomatic TRANS general population,19 asymptomatic TRANS people found to be seropositive IgG for SARS-CoV-2 with Mean or average total seropositivity rate of 4.15%. 19 Out of 30 (63.33%) RTPCR positive patients found Seronegative. Median of Days between RTPCR test and sero SERO negativity found was 60 with minimum 28 days to maximum 101 days and Range of 73 days and a standard deviation of 19.46. Those having Travel TRANS History and having occupation MESHD as Migrant Labourer have significantly higher probability of getting infected with SARS-CoV-2. No role has been found of Hydroxychloroquine Medicines as Chemoprophylactic. No durable immunity conferred by natural infection with SARS-CoV-2 mean time to become seronegative after positive RTPCR test 60 days. So there is a chance of reinfection after average 2 months.

    A dual antigen ELISA SERO allows the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO in a low transmission TRANS setting

    Authors: Sarah Hicks; Kai Pohl; Teresa Neeman; Hayley McNamara; Kate Parsons; Jin-Shu He; Sidra Ali; Samina Nazir; Louise Rowntree; Thi Nguyen; Katherine Kedzierska; Denise Doolan; Carola Vinuesa; Matthew Cook; Nicholas Coatsworth; Paul Myles; Florian Kurth; Leif Sander; Russell Gruen; Graham Mann; Amee George; Elizabeth Gardiner; Ian Cockburn; Bala Pesala; Debojyoti Chakraborty; Souvik Maiti

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191031 Date: 2020-09-14 Source: medRxiv

    Estimates of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been hampered by inadequate assay sensitivity SERO and specificity. Using an ELISA SERO-based approach to that combines data about IgG responses to both the Nucleocapsid and Spike-receptor binding domain antigens, we show that near-optimal sensitivity SERO and specificity can be achieved. We used this assay to assess the frequency of virus-specific antibodies SERO in a cohort of elective surgery patients in Australia and estimated seroprevalence SERO in Australia to be 0.28% (0 to 0.72%). These data confirm the low level of transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2 in Australia before July 2020 and validate the specificity of our assay.

    Development, clinical translation, and utility of a COVID-19 antibody test SERO with qualitative and quantitative readouts

    Authors: Robert H. Bortz III; Catalina Florez; Ethan Laudermilch; Ariel S Wirchnianski; Gorka Lasso; Ryan J Malonis; George I Georgiev; Olivia Vergnolle; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20192187 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) continues to place an immense burden on societies and healthcare systems. A key component of COVID-19 control efforts is serologic testing SERO to determine the community prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 exposure and quantify individual immune responses to prior infection MESHD or vaccination. Here, we describe a laboratory-developed antibody test SERO that uses readily available research-grade reagents to detect SARS-CoV-2 exposure in patient blood SERO samples with high sensitivity SERO and specificity. We further show that this test affords the estimation of viral spike-specific IgG titers from a single sample measurement, thereby providing a simple and scalable method to measure the strength of an individual's immune response. The accuracy, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of this test makes it an excellent option for clinical deployment in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies SERO Among 925 Staff Members in an Urban Hospital Accepting COVID-19 Patients in Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Authors: Tsutomu Nishida; Hiromi Iwahashi; Kazuhiro Yamauchi; Noriko Kinoshita; Yukiyoshi Okauchi; Norihiro Suzuki; Masami Inada; Kinya Abe; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20191866 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD rate in hospitals during the pandemic remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of our hospital's current nosocomial infection control, we conducted a serological survey of the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO (immunoglobulin G) among the staff of our hospital, which is treating coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G in the participants using a laboratory-based quantitative test (Abbott immunoassay SERO), which has a sensitivity SERO and specificity of 100% and 99.6%, respectively. To investigate the factors associated with seropositivity, we also obtained some information from the participants with an anonymous questionnaire. Results: We invited 1133 staff members in our hospital, and 925 (82%) participated. The mean age TRANS of the participants was 40.0{+/-}11.8 years, and most were women (80.0%). According to job title, there were 149 medical doctors or dentists (16.0%), 489 nurses (52.9%), 140 medical technologists (14.2%), 49 healthcare providers (5.3%), and 98 administrative staff (10.5%). The overall prevalence SERO of seropositivity for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG was 0.43% (4/925), which was similar to the control seroprevalence SERO of 0.54% (16/2970)) in the general population in Osaka during the same period according to a government survey conducted with the same assay. Seropositive rates did not significantly differ according to job title, exposure to suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, or any other investigated factors. Conclusion: The subclinical SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rate in our hospital was not higher than that in the general population under our nosocomial infection MESHD control measures.

    Retrospective study of COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors at the onset of the outbreak before implementation of strict lockdown measures in France

    Authors: Nicolas Germain; Stephanie Herwegh; Anne Sophie Hatzfeld; Laurence Bocket; Brigitte Prevost; Pierre Marie Danze; Philippe Marchetti; Rachael Dodd; Brooke Nickel; Kristen Pickles; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Kirsten J McCaffery; Aboubacar Sidiki Magassouba; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.20192518 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has altered organ and tissue donations as well as transplantation practices. SARS-CoV-2 serological tests SERO could help in the selection of donors. We assessed COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO in a population of tissue donors, at the onset of the outbreak in France, before systematic screening of donors for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Methods: 235 tissue donors at the Lille Tissue bank between November 1, 2019 and March 16, 2020 were included. Archived serum SERO samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using two FDA-approved kits. Results: Most donors were at higher risks for severe COVID-19 illness including age TRANS over 65 years (142/235) and/or presence of co-morbidities (141/235). According to the COVID-19 risk assessment of transmission TRANS, 183 out of 235 tissue donors presented with a low risk level and 52 donors with an intermediate risk level of donor derived infection MESHD. Four out of the 235 (1.7%) tested specimens were positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO: 2 donors with anti-N protein IgG and 2 other donors with anti-S protein total Ig. None of them had both type of antibodies SERO. Conclusion: Regarding the seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors, we concluded that the transmission TRANS probability to recipient via tissue products was very low at the beginning of the outbreak.

    Robust SARS-COV-2 serological population screens via multi-antigen rules-based approach

    Authors: Christos F Fotis; Nikolaos Meimetis; Nikos Tsolakos; Marianna Politou; Karolina Akinosoglou; Vicky Pliaka; Angeliki Minia; Evangelos Terpos; Ioannis P. Trougakos; Andreas Mentis; Markos Marangos; George Panayiotakopoulos; Meletios A. Dimopoulos; Charalampos Gogos; Alexandros Spyridonidis; Leonidas G. Alexopoulos

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191122 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: medRxiv

    More than 300 SARS-COV-2 serological tests SERO have recently been developed using either the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), the spike glycoprotein subunit (S1), and more recently the receptor binding domain (RBD). Most of the assays report very good clinical performance SERO characteristics in well-controlled clinical settings. However, there is a growing belief that good performance SERO characteristics that are obtained during clinical performance SERO trials might not be sufficient to deliver good diagnostic results in population-wide screens that are usually characterized with low seroprevalence SERO. In this paper, we developed a serological assay SERO against N, S1 and RBD using a bead-based multiplex platform and a rules-based computational approach to assess the performance SERO of single and multi-antigen readouts in well-defined clinical samples and in a population-wide serosurvey from blood SERO donors. Even though assays based on single antigen readouts performed similarly well in the clinical samples, there was a striking difference between the antigens on the population-wide screen. Asymptomatic TRANS individuals with low antibody SERO titers and sub-optimal assay specificity might contribute to the large discrepancies in population studies with low seroprevalence SERO. A multi-antigen assay requiring partial agreement between RBD, N and S1 readouts exhibited enhanced specificity, less dependency on assay cut-off values and an overall more robust performance SERO in both sample settings. Our data suggest that assays based on multiple antigen readouts combined with a rules-based computational consensus can provide a more robust platform for routine antibody SERO screening.

    Model-informed COVID-19 vaccine prioritization strategies by age TRANS and serostatus

    Authors: Kate M Bubar; Stephen M Kissler; Marc Lipsitch; Sarah Cobey; Yonatan Grad; Daniel B Larremore

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.08.20190629 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: medRxiv

    When a vaccine for COVID-19 becomes available, limited initial supply will raise the question of how to prioritize the available doses and thus underscores the need for transparent, evidence-based strategies that relate knowledge of, and uncertainty in, disease transmission, risk TRANS, vaccine efficacy, and existing population immunity. Here, we employ a model-informed approach to vaccine prioritization that evaluates the impact of prioritization strategies on cumulative incidence and mortality and accounts for population factors such as age TRANS, contact structure, and seroprevalence SERO, and vaccine factors including imperfect and age TRANS-varying efficacy. This framework can be used to evaluate and compare existing strategies, and it can also be used to derive an optimal prioritization strategy to minimize mortality or incidence. We find that a transmission TRANS-blocking vaccine should be prioritized to adults TRANS ages TRANS 20-49y to minimize cumulative incidence and to adults TRANS over 60y to minimize mortality. Direct vaccination of adults TRANS over 60y minimizes mortality for vaccines that do not block transmission TRANS. We also estimate the potential benefit of using individual-level serological tests SERO to redirect doses to only seronegative individuals, improving the marginal impact of each dose. We argue that this serology-informed vaccination approach may improve the efficiency of vaccination efforts while partially addressing existing inequities in COVID-19 burden and impact.

    Clinical Performance SERO Evaluation of a SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO for Determining Past Exposure to SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Peter Findeisen; Hugo Stiegler; Eloisa Lopez-Calle; Tanja Schneider; Eva Urlaub; Johannes Hayer; Claudia Silke Zemmrich

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20180687 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: medRxiv

    The true prevalence SERO and population seropositivity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD remains unknown, due to the number of asymptomatic TRANS infections MESHD and limited access to high- performance SERO antibody tests SERO. To control the COVID-19 pandemic it is crucial to understand the true seroprevalence SERO, but not every region has access to extensive centralized PCR and serology testing. Currently available rapid antibody tests SERO lack the accuracy needed for recommendation by health authorities. To fill this gap, we analyzed and validated the clinical performance SERO of a new point-of-care SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody SERO Assay, a chromatographic immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of IgM/IgG antibodies SERO for use in near-patient settings. Analysis was performed using 42 Anti-SARS-Cov-2 positive (CoV+) and 92 Anti-SARS-Covid-2 negative (CoV-) leftover samples from before December 2019, using the Elecsys(R) Anti-SARS-CoV-2 as the reference assay. Analytical specificity was tested using leftover samples from individuals with symptoms of common cold collected before December 2019. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO was 100.0% (95% CI 91.59-100.00) sensitive and 96.74% (95% CI 90.77-99.32) specific with an assay failure rate of 0.00%. No cross-reactivity was observed against the common cold panel. Method comparison was additionally conducted by two external laboratories, using 100 CoV+/275 CoV- samples, also comparing whole blood SERO versus plasma SERO matrix. The comparison demonstrated for plasma SERO 96.00% positive/96.36% negative percent agreement with the Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and overall 99.20% percent agreement between whole blood SERO and EDTA plasma SERO. The SARS-CoV-2 Rapid Antibody Test SERO demonstrated similar clinical performance SERO to the manufacturer's data and to a centralized automated immunoassay SERO, with no cross-reactivity to common cold panels.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar, northern India - a cross-sectional study

    Authors: S Muhammad Salim Khan; Mariya Amin Qurieshi; Inaamul Haq; Sabhiya Majid; Arif Akbar Bhat; Sahila Nabi; Nisar Ahmad Ganai; Nazia Zahoor; Auqfeen Nisar; Iqra Nisar Chowdri; Tanzeela Bashir Qazi; Rafiya Kousar; Abdul Aziz Lone; Iram Sabah; Shahroz Nabi; Ishtiyaq Ahmad Sumji; Misbah Ferooz Kawoosa; Shifana Ayoub; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Sezer Akyoney; Ilayda Sahin; Ugur Ozbek; Dilek Telci; Fikrettin Sahin; Koray Yalcin; Ercument Ovali

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.04.282640 Date: 2020-09-04 Source: bioRxiv

    BackgroundPrevalence of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD provides essential information for deciding disease prevention and mitigation measures. We estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO in District Srinagar. Methods2906 persons >18 years of age TRANS selected from hospital visitors across District Srinagar participated in the study. We tested samples for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay SERO-based serologic test SERO. ResultsAge- and gender TRANS-standardized seroprevalence SERO was 3.6% (95% CI 2.9% to 4.3%). Age TRANS 30-69 years, a recent history of symptoms of an influenza-like-illness, and a history of being placed under quarantine were significantly related to higher odds of the presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO. The estimated number of SARS-CoV-2 infections during the two weeks preceding the study, adjusted for test performance SERO, was 32602 with an estimated (median) infection-to-known-case ratio of 46 (95% CI 36 to 57). ConclusionsThe seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies SERO is low in the District. A large proportion of the population is still susceptible to the infection. A sizeable number of infections remain undetected, and a substantial proportion of people with symptoms compatible with COVID-19 are not tested.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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