Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Hypertension (64)

Fever (16)

Obesity (16)

Cough (14)

Dyspnea (10)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 21 - 30 records in total 64
    records per page




    Clinical Features and Outcomes of COVID-19 in Older Adults TRANS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Authors: Sunny Singhal; Pramod Kumar; Sumitabh Singh; Srishti Saha; Aparajit Ballav Dey

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-38971/v1 Date: 2020-06-29 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Few studies have focused on exploring the clinical characteristics and outcomes of COVID-19 in older patients. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to have a better understanding of the clinical characteristics of older COVID-19 patients.Methods A systematic search of PubMed and Scopus was performed from December 2019 to May 3rd, 2020. Observational studies including older adults TRANS ( age TRANS ≥60 years) with COVID-19 infection MESHD and reporting clinical characteristics or outcome were included. Primary outcome was assessing weighted pooled prevalence SERO (WPP) of severity and outcomes. Secondary outcomes were clinical features including comorbidities and need of respiratory support.Result 46 studies with 13,624 older patients were included. Severe infection HP infection MESHD was seen in 51% (95% CI– 36-65%, I2- 95%) patients while 22% (95% CI– 16-28%, I2- 88%) were critically ill. Overall, 11% (95% CI– 5-21%, I2- 98%) patients died. The common comorbidities were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (48%, 95% CI– 36-60% I2- 92%), diabetes mellitus HP diabetes mellitus MESHD (22%, 95% CI– 13-32%, I2- 86%) and cardiovascular disease MESHD (19%, 95% CI – 11-28%, I2- 85%). Common symptoms were fever HP fever MESHD (83%, 95% CI– 66-97%, I2-91%), cough HP cough MESHD (60%, 95% CI– 50-70%, I2- 71%) and dyspnoea MESHD (42%, 95% CI– 19-67%, I2- 94%). Overall, 84% (95% CI– 60-100%, I2- 81%) required oxygen support and 21% (95% CI– 0-49%, I2- 91%) required mechanical ventilation. Majority of studies had medium to high risk of bias and overall quality of evidence was low for all outcomes.Conclusion Approximately half of older patients with COVID-19 have severe infection HP infection MESHD, one in five are critically ill and one in ten die. More high quality evidence is needed to study outcomes in this vulnerable patient population and factors affecting these outcomes.

    Outcomes and Cardiovascular Comorbidities MESHD in a Predominantly African-American Population with COVID-19

    Authors: Ann B. Nguyen; Gaurav A. Upadhyay; Ben Chung; Bryan Smith; Stephanie A. Besser; Julie A. Johnson; John Blair; R. Parker Ward; Jeanne DeCara; Tamar Polonsky; Amit R. Patel; Jonathan Grinstein; Luise Holzhauser; Rohan Kalathiya; Atman P. Shah; Jonathan Paul; Sandeep Nathan; James Liao; Roberto M. Lang; Krysta Wolfe; Ayodeji Adegunsoye; David Wu; Bhakti Patel; Monica E. Peek; Doriane Miller; Dinesh J. Kurian; Stephen R. Estime; Allison Dalton; Avery Tung; Michael F. O'Connor; John P. Kress; Francis J. Alenghat; Roderick Tung

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.28.20141929 Date: 2020-06-29 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Racial disparities in COVID-19 outcomes have been amplified during this pandemic and reports on outcomes in African-American (AA) populations, known to have higher rates of cardiovascular (CV) comorbidities, remain limited. Objective: To examine prevalence SERO of comorbidities, rates of hospitalization and survival, and incidence of CV manifestations of COVID-19 in a predominantly AA population in south metropolitan Chicago. Design, Setting, Participants: This was an observational cohort study of COVID-19 patients encountered from March 16 to April 16, 2020 at the University of Chicago. Deidentified data were obtained from an institutional data warehouse. Group comparisons and logistic regression modeling based on baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory and diagnostic testing was performed. Exposures: COVID-19 was diagnosed by nasopharyngeal swab testing and clinical management was at the discretion of treating physicians. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes were hospitalization and in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcomes included incident CV manifestations of COVID-19 in the context of overall cardiology service utilization. Results: During the 30 day study period, 1008 patients tested positive for COVID-19 and 689 had available encounter data. Of these, 596 (87%) were AA and 356 (52%) were hospitalized, of which 319 (90%) were AA. Age TRANS > 60 years, tobacco use, BMI >40 kg/m2, diabetes mellitus HP diabetes mellitus MESHD ( DM MESHD), insulin use, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD, coronary artery disease MESHD ( CAD MESHD), and atrial fibrillation HP atrial fibrillation MESHD ( AF MESHD) were more common in hospitalized patients. Age TRANS > 60 years, tobacco use, CAD MESHD, and AF MESHD were associated with greater risk of in-hospital mortality along with several elevated initial laboratory markers including troponin, NT-proBNP, blood SERO urea nitrogen, and ferritin. Despite this, cardiac manifestations of COVID-19 were uncommon, coincident with a 69% decrease in cardiology service utilization. For hospitalized patients, median length of stay was 6.2 days (3.4-11.9 days) and mortality was 13%. AA patients were more commonly hospitalized, but without increased mortality. Conclusions and Relevance: In this AA-predominant experience from south metropolitan Chicago, CV comorbidities and chronic diseases MESHD were highly prevalent and associated with increased hospitalization and mortality. Insulin-requiring DM MESHD and CKD emerged as novel predictors for hospitalization. Despite the highest rate of comorbidities reported to date, CV manifestations of COVID-19 and mortality were relatively low. The unexpectedly low rate of mortality merits further study.

    Pulmonary Adverse Event Data in Hypertension HP Hypertension MESHD with Implications on COVID-19 Morbidity

    Authors: Emma G. Stafford; Jim Riviere; Xuan Xu; Nuwan Indika Millagaha Gedara; Jessica Kawakami; Gerald J. Wyckoff; Majid Jaberi-Douraki

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37854/v1 Date: 2020-06-25 Source: ResearchSquare

    Hypertension HP Hypertension MESHD is a recognized comorbidity for COVID-19. The contribution of medications to COVID-19 morbidity in hypertensive MESHD patients is unknown; however, ACE2, responsible for SARS-CoV-2 cell entry, is upregulated in patients taking ACEI and ARB antihypertensive drugs. Here, we evaluated prevalence SERO of pulmonary adverse drug events (ADEs) in hypertensive MESHD patients receiving ACEIs/ARBs to help elucidate how these medications may affect clinical outcomes in acute respiratory illnesses. ADEs reported to the FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System for hypertensive MESHD patients taking ACEI or ARB drugs show a cluster of pulmonary symptoms MESHD potentially exacerbating symptoms in COVID-19 patients. We found that retrospective analysis of 13 predominant pulmonary ADEs showed significant differences in ADEs associated with Quinapril and Trandolapril, compared to all other ACEIs and all ARBs. This study suggests that specific members of the ACEI hypertensive MESHD class (Quinapril and Trandolapril) have a cluster of pulmonary ADEs which could impact the management of COVID-19 patients. 

    Prevalence SERO and risks of severe events for cancer MESHD patients with COVID-19 infection MESHD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Qiang Su; Jie-xuan Hu; Hai-shan Lin; Zheng Zhang; Emily C Zhu; Chen-guang Zhang; Di-ya Wang; Zu-hua Gao; Bang-wei Cao

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.23.20136200 Date: 2020-06-24 Source: medRxiv

    Background The corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses a severe challenge to public health, especially to those patients with underlying diseases. In this meta-analysis, we studied the prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD among patients with COVID-19 infection and their risks TRANS infection and their risks TRANS infection and their risks MESHD of severe events. Methods We searched the Pubmed, Embase and MedRxiv databases for studies between December 2019 and May 3, 2020 using the following key words and terms: sars-cov-2, covid-19, 2019-ncov, 2019 novel coronavirus, corona virus disease-2019, clinical, clinical characteristics, clinical course, epidemiologic features, epidemiology, and epidemiological characteristics. We extracted data following PICO (patient, intervention, comparison and outcome) chart. Statistical analyses were performed with R Studio (version 3.5.1) on the group-level data. We assessed the studies risk of bias in accordance to the adjusted Joanna Briggs Institute. We estimated the prevalence SERO or risks for severe events including admission into intensive care unit or death using meta-analysis with random effects. Findings Out of the 2,551 studies identified, 32 studies comprising 21,248 participants have confirmed COVID-19. The total prevalence SERO of cancer MESHD in COVID-19 patients was 3.97% (95% CI, 3.08% to 5.12%), higher than that of the total cancer MESHD rate (0.29%) in China. Stratification analysis showed that the overall cancer MESHD prevalence SERO of COVID-19 patients in China was 2.59% (95% CI, 1.72% to 3.90%), and the prevalence SERO reached 3.79% in Wuhan (95% CI, 2.51% to 5.70%) and 2.31% (95% CI, 1.16% to 4.57%) in other areas outside Wuhan in China. The incidence of ICU admission in cancer MESHD patients with COVID-19 was 26.80% (95% CI, 21.65% to 32.67%) and the mortality was 24.32% (95% CI, 13.95% to 38.91%), much higher than the overall rates of COVID-19 patients in China. The fatality in COVID patients with cancer MESHD was lower than those with cardiovascular disease MESHD (OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.71; p=0.39), but comparable with other comorbidities such as diabetes MESHD (OR 1.32; 95% CI, 0.42 to 4.11; p=0.19), hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (OR 1.27; 95% CI, 0.35 to 4.62; p=0.13), and respiratory diseases MESHD (OR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.47 to 1.33; p=0.45). Interpretation This comprehensive meta-analysis on the largest number of patients to date provides solid evidence that COVID-19 infection significantly and negatively affected the disease course and prognosis of cancer MESHD patients. Awareness of this could help guide clinicians and health policy makers in combating cancer MESHD in the context of COVID-19 pandemic.

    Low serum SERO 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D) levels in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are associated with greater disease severity: results of a local audit of practice.

    Authors: Grigorios Panagiotou; Su Ann Tee; Yasir Ihsan; Waseem Athar; Gabriella Marchitelli; Donna Kelly; Christopher S. Boot; Nadia Stock; Jim Macfarlane; Adrian R. Martineau; Graham Paul Burns; Richard Quinton

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.21.20136903 Date: 2020-06-23 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: To audit implementation of a local protocol for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency MESHD ( VDD MESHD) among patients hospitalized for Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19), including an assessment of the prevalence SERO of VDD MESHD in these patients, and of potential associations with disease severity and fatality. Design: This was not a study or clinical trial, but rather a retrospective interim audit (Newcastle-upon-Tyne Hospitals Registration No. 10075) of a local clinical care pathway for hospitalized patients with COVID-19-related illness. The Information (Caldicott) Guardian permitted these data to be shared beyond the confines of our institution. Setting: A large tertiary academic NHS Foundation Trust in the North East of England, UK, providing care to COVID-19 patients. Participants: One hundred thirty-four hospitalized patients with documented COVID-19 infection MESHD. Main outcome measures: Adherence to local investigation and treatment protocol; prevalence SERO of VDD MESHD, and relationship of baseline serum SERO 25(OH)D with markers of COVID-19 severity and inpatient fatality versus recovery. Results: 55.8% of eligible patients received Colecalciferol replacement, albeit not always loaded as rapidly as our protocol suggested, and no cases of new hypercalcaemia MESHD occurred following treatment. Patients admitted to ITU were younger than those managed on medical wards (61.1 years +/- 11.8 vs. 76.4 years +/- 14.9, p<0.001), with greater prevalence SERO of hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, and higher baseline respiratory rate, National Early Warning Score-2 and C-reactive protein level. While mean serum SERO 25(OH)D levels were comparable [i.e. ITU: 33.5 nmol/L +/- 16.8 vs. Non-ITU: 48.1 nmol/L +/- 38.2, mean difference for Ln-transformed-25(OH)D: 0.14, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (-0.15, 0.41), p=0.3], only 19% of ITU patients had 25(OH)D levels greater than 50 nmol/L vs. 60.9% of non-ITU patients (p=0.02). However, we found no association with fatality, potentially due to small sample size, limitations of no-trial data and, potentially, the prompt diagnosis and treatment of VDD MESHD. Conclusions: Subject to the inherent limitations of observational (non-trial) audit data, analysed retrospectively, we found that patients requiring ITU admission were more frequently vitamin D deficient than those managed on medical wards, despite being significantly younger. Larger prospective studies and/or clinical trials are needed to elucidate the role of vitamin D as a preventive and/or therapeutic strategy for mitigating the effects of COVID-19 infection MESHD in patients with VDD MESHD.

    Epidemiological Risk Factors Associated with Death and Severe Disease MESHD in Patients Suffering From COVID-19: A Comprehensive Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Authors: Kunchok Dorjee; Hyunju Kim

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.19.20135483 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction: Progression of COVID-19 to severe disease and death MESHD is insufficiently understood. Objective: Summarize the prevalence SERO adverse outcomes, risk factors, and association of risk factors with adverse outcomes in COVID-19 patients. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase and Web of Science for case-series and observational studies of hospitalized COVID-19 patients through May 22, 2020. Data were analyzed by fixed-effects meta-analysis, using Shore adjusted confidence intervals to address heterogeneity. Results: Forty-four studies comprising 20594 hospitalized patients met inclusion criteria; 12591 from the US-Europe and 7885 from China. Pooled prevalence SERO of death [%(95% CI)] was 18% (15-22%). Of those that died, 76% were aged TRANS>=60 years, 68% were males TRANS, and 63%, 38%, and 29% had hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, diabetes MESHD and heart disease MESHD, respectively. The case fatality risk [%(95% CI)] were 62% (48-78) for heart disease MESHD, 51% (36-71) for COPD MESHD, and 42% (34-50) for age TRANS>=60 years and 49% (33-71) for chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD ( CKD MESHD). Summary relative risk (sRR) of death MESHD were higher for age TRANS>=60 years [sRR=3.8; 95% CI: 2.9-4.8; n=12 studies], males TRANS [1.3; 1.2-1.5; 17], smoking history [1.9; 1.1-3.3; n=6], COPD [2.0; 1.6-2.4; n=9], hypertension HP hypertension MESHD [1.8; 1.7-2.0; n=14], diabetes MESHD [1.5; 1.4-1.7; n=16], heart disease MESHD [2.0; 1.7-2.4; 16] and CKD MESHD [2.0; 1.3-3.1; 8]. The overall prevalence SERO of hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (55%), diabetes MESHD (31%) and heart disease MESHD (16%) among COVODI-19 patients in the US were substantially higher than the general US population. Conclusions: Public health screening for COVID-19 can be prioritized based on risk-groups. A higher prevalence SERO of cardiovascular risk factors in COVID-19 patients can suggest increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 acquisition in the population.

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A systematic review and analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v2 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance.Aim: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19.Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2.Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease MESHD (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer MESHD (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease MESHD (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD MESHD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease MESHD (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms were fever HP fever MESHD (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP myalgia MESHD/ fatigue HP fatigue MESHD (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease MESHD, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD or chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD/ pain HP pain MESHD were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease MESHD, and coronary heart disease MESHD, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes MESHD and hypertension HP hypertension MESHD and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity. 

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A scoping review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v3 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance. Objectives: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19. Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s-test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2. Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms recorded during the course of admission were fever HP (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP/ fatigue HP (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP or chest tightness HP/ pain HP were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension HP and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity.

    National Smoking Rates Correlate Inversely with COVID-19 Mortality

    Authors: Michael J Norden; David H. Avery; Justin G Norden; David R Haynor

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.12.20129825 Date: 2020-06-14 Source: medRxiv

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Recent studies show cigarette smokers are markedly under-represented among patients hospitalized for COVID-19 in over a dozen countries. It is unclear if this may be related to confounding factors such as age TRANS distribution, access to care, and inaccurate records. We hypothesized that these concerns could be avoided by studying smoking prevalence SERO in relation to COVID-19 mortality. Since climate has been identified as a factor in COVID-19, we studied groups of countries with relatively comparable temperatures. Methods: The 20 hottest and 20 coldest countries in the Johns Hopkins Mortality Analysis database with a minimum mortality rate of .3 deaths/100,000 were selected on the basis of the average temperatures of their largest city. Mortality rates were determined as of May 1, 2020 and correlated with national smoking rate adjusting for sex ratio, obesity HP obesity MESHD, temperature, and elderly TRANS population. Results: A highly significant inverse correlation between current daily smoking prevalence SERO and COVID-19 mortality rate was noted for the group of hot countries (R=-.718, p = .0002), cold countries (R=-.567, p=.0046), and the combined group (R=-.324, p=.0207). However, after adjustments only the regression for hot countries and the combined group remained significant. In hot countries, for each percentage point increase in smoking rate mortality decreased by .147 per 100,000 population (95% CI .102- 192, p=.0066). This resulted in mortality rates several-fold elevated in the countries with the lowest smoking rates relative to the highest smoking rates. In the combined group, mortality decreased by .257 per 100,000 population (95% CI .175-.339, p=.0034). Discussion: These findings add support to the finding of an inverse relationship between current smoking and seriously symptomatic COVID-19. However, we conclude that the difference in mortality between the highest and lowest smoking countries appears too large to be due primarily to the effects of smoking per se. A potentially beneficial effect of smoking is surprising, but compatible with a number of hypothetical mechanisms which deserve exploration: 1) Studies show smoking alters ACE2 expression which may affect COVID-19 infection MESHD or its progression to serious lung pathology. 2) Nicotine has anti-inflammatory activity and also appears to alter ACE2 expression. 3) Nitric oxide in cigarette smoke is known to be effective in treating pulmonary hypertension MESHD hypertension HP and has shown in vitro antiviral effects including against SARS-CoV-2. 4) Smoking has complicated effects on the immune system involving both up and down regulation, any of which might alone or in concert antagonize progression of COVID-19. 5) Smokers are exposed to hot vapors which may stimulate immunity in the respiratory tract by various heat-related mechanisms (e.g. heat shock HP proteins). Studies of steam and sauna treatments have shown efficacy in other viral respiratory conditions. At this time there is no clear evidence that smoking is protective against COVID-19, so the established recommendations to avoid smoking should be emphasized. The interaction of smoking and COVID-19 will only be reliably determined by carefully designed prospective study, and there is reason to believe that there are unknown confounds that may be spuriously suggesting a protective effect of smoking. However, the magnitude of the apparent inverse association of COVID-19 and smoking and its myriad clinical implications suggest the importance of further investigation.

    PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF COMORMIDITY FOR SEVERITY OF COVID-19: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS STUDY

    Authors: Mobina Fathi; Kimia Vakili; Fatemeh Sayehmiri; Ashraf Mohamadkhani; Mohammadreza Hajiesmaeili; Mostafa Rezaei-Tavirani; Owrang Eilami

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.11.20128835 Date: 2020-06-12 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract: Background and Aim: With the increase in the number of COVID-19 infections, global health is facing insufficient sources; this study aimed to provide additional data regarding the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and in particular to analyze the factors associated with disease severity, unimprovement and mortality. Methods: 82 studies were included in the present meta-analysis that all of them have been published before May 1, 2020 and were found by searching through the databases Scopus and MEDLINE. The selected papers were studied and analyzed by employing the version 14 of stata software. It should be noted that, we employed I2 statistics for testing and verifying heterogeneity. Results: 82 papers were finally chosen for this meta- analysis, including 74855 infected MESHD patients (35673 men, 31140 women). The mean age TRANS of the patients was 56.49. The results indicate the prevalence SERO of fever HP fever MESHD 79.84 (95% CI: 75.22-84.13), cough HP 59.53 (95% CI: 55.35-63.65), fatigue HP fatigue MESHD or myalgia HP myalgia MESHD 33.46 (95% CI: 28.68-38.40), dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD 31.48 (95% CI: 25.75-37.49) and diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD 10.71 (95% CI: 8.20-13.49). The prevalence SERO of the most common comorbidities were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD 25.10 (95% CI: 19.91-30.64), diabetes MESHD 13.48 (95% CI: 10.61-16.62), cardiovascular diseases MESHD 8.94 (95% CI: 6.99-11.10), and chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD 3.27 (95% CI: 2.22-4.47). Conclusion: The results of this study are seriously needed to effectively monitor the health of people with comorbidities ( hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, diabetes MESHD, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease MESHD, coronary heart disease MESHD disease, and chronic kidney HP chronic kidney disease MESHD) to prevent the development of COVID-19 infection MESHD.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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