Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Diarrhea (27)

Fever (14)

Cough (13)

Fatigue (11)

Dyspnea (9)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 27
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    Review of clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of COVID-19 in children TRANS-Systematic review and Meta-analysis

    Authors: Harmeet K Kharoud; Rizwana Asim; Lianne Siegel; Lovepreet Chahal; Gagan Deep Singh; Anna Marit de Groot; Jeroen Stoop; Sarah Tete; Wim Van Damme; Isabel Leroux-Roels; Pieter-Jan Berghmans; Murray Kimmel; Pierre Van Damme; Jan De Hoon; William Smith; Kathryn Stephenson; Dan Barouch; Stephen De Rosa; Kristen Cohen; Juliana McElrath; Emmanuel Cormier; Gert Scheper; Jenny Hendriks; Frank Struyf; Macaya Douoguih; Johan Van Hoof; Hanneke Schuitemaker

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.23.20200410 Date: 2020-09-25 Source: medRxiv

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the prevalence SERO of various clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of COVID-19 in children TRANS. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS databases were searched to include studies conducted between January 1, 2020, and July 15, 2020 which reported data about clinical characteristics and laboratory findings in laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 in pediatric patients. Random effects meta-analysis using generalized linear mixed models was used to estimate the pooled prevalence SERO. RESULTS: The most prevalent symptom of COVID-19 in children TRANS was 46.17% (95%CI 39.18-53.33%), followed by cough HP (40.15%, 95%CI 34.56-46.02%). Less common symptoms were found to be dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD, vomiting HP vomiting MESHD, nasal congestion/ rhinorrhea HP rhinorrhea MESHD, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, sore throat/pharyngeal congestion, headache HP headache MESHD, and fatigue HP fatigue MESHD. The prevalence SERO of asymptomatic TRANS children TRANS was 17.19% (95%CI 11.02-25.82%). The most prevalent laboratory findings in COVID-19 children TRANS were elevated Creatinine Kinase (26.86%, 95%CI 16.15-41.19%) and neutropenia HP neutropenia MESHD (25.76%, 95%CI 13.96-42.58%). These were followed by elevated LDH, thrombocytosis HP thrombocytosis MESHD, lymphocytosis HP lymphocytosis MESHD, neutrophilia HP, elevated D Dimer, Elevated CRP, elevated ESR, leukocytosis HP leukocytosis MESHD, elevated AST and leukopenia HP leukopenia MESHD. There was a low prevalence SERO of elevated ALT and lymphopenia HP lymphopenia MESHD in children TRANS with COVID- 19. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study provides estimates of the pooled prevalence SERO of various symptoms and laboratory findings of COVID-19 in the pediatric population.

    Prevalence SERO and correlation of symptoms and comorbidities in COVID-19 patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Mohammad Meshbahur Rahman; Badhan Bhattacharjee; Zaki Farhana; Mohammad Hamiduzzaman; Muhammad Abdul Bake Chowdhury; Mohammad Sorowar Hossain; Mahbubul H Siddiqee; Md. Ziaul Islam; Enayetur Raheem; Md. Jamal Uddin

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.19.20177980 Date: 2020-08-22 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 affected millions of people, and the patients present a constellation of symptoms and comorbidities. We aimed to chronicle the prevalence SERO and correlations of symptoms and comorbidities, and associated covariates among the patients. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis [PROSPERO registration: CRD42020182677]. Databases [PubMed, SCOPUS, EMBASE, WHO, Semantic Scholar, and COVID-19 Primer] were searched for clinical studies published in English from January 1 to April 20, 2020. The pooled prevalence SERO of symptoms and comorbidities were identified using the random effect model, and sub-groups analysis of patients age TRANS and locations were investigated. A multivariable factor analysis was also performed to show the correlation among symptoms, comorbidities and age TRANS of the COVID-19 patients. Findings: Twenty-nine articles [China (24); Outside of China (5)], with 4,884 COVID-19 patients were included in this systematic review. The meta-analysis investigated 33 symptoms, where fever HP fever MESHD [84%], cough HP cough MESHD/dry cough HP [61%], and fatigue HP fatigue MESHD/weakness [42%] were found frequent. Out of 43 comorbidities investigated, acute respiratory distress syndrome MESHD respiratory distress HP syndrome ( ARDS MESHD) [61%] was a common condition, followed by hypertension HP hypertension MESHD [23%] and diabetes MESHD [12%]. According to the patients age TRANS, the prevalence SERO of symptoms like fatigue HP fatigue MESHD/weakness, dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD/shortness of breath, and anorexia HP anorexia MESHD were highly prevalent in older adults TRANS [[≥]50 years] than younger adults TRANS [<50 years]. Diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, coronary heart disease MESHD, and COPD MESHD/ lung disease MESHD were more prevalent comorbidities in older adults TRANS than younger adults TRANS. The patients from outside of China had significantly higher prevalence SERO [p<0.005] of diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, nausea HP nausea MESHD, sore throat, and dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD, and the prevalent comorbidities in that region were diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, coronary heart disease MESHD, and ARDS MESHD. The multivariable factor analysis showed positive association between a group of symptoms and comorbidities, and with the patients age TRANS. Interpretation: Epitomizing the correlation of symptoms of COVID-19 with comorbidities and patients age TRANS would help clinicians effectively manage the patients.

    Children TRANS with COVID-19 like symptoms in Italian Pediatric Surgeries: the dark side of the coin

    Authors: Gianfranco Trapani; Vassilios Fanos; Enrico Bertino; Giulia Maiocco; Osama Al Jamal; Michele Fiore; VIncenzo Bembo; Domenico Careddu; Lando Barberio; Luisella Zanino; Giuseppe Verlato

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.27.20149757 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    BACKGROUND: Symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS are nonspecific and shared with other common acute viral illnesses ( fever HP fever MESHD, respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms MESHD, and cutaneous signs), thus making clinical differential diagnosis tricky. In Italy, first line management of pediatric care is handed over to Primary Care Pediatricians (PCPs), who were not allowed to directly perform diagnostic tests during the recent COVID-19 outbreak. Without a confirmatory diagnosis, PCPs could only collect information on ''COVID-19 like symptoms'' rather than identify typical COVID-19 symptoms. AIM: To evaluate the prevalence SERO of COVID-19 like symptoms in outpatient children TRANS, during Italian lockdown. To provide PCPs a risk score to be used in clinical practice during the differential diagnosis process. METHODS: A survey was submitted to 50 PCPs (assisting 47,500 children TRANS) from 7 different Italian regions between the 4th of March and the 23rd of May 2020 (total and partial lockdown period). COVID-19 like symptoms in the assisted children TRANS were recorded, as well as presence of confirmed/suspected cases in children TRANS's families, which was taken as proxy of COVID-19. Multivariable logistic regression was accomplished to estimate the risk of having suspected/ confirmed cases TRANS in families, considering symptoms as potential determinants. RESULTS: 2,300 children TRANS (4.8% of overall survey population) fell HP ill with COVID-19 like symptoms, 3.1% and 1.7% during total and partial lockdown period respectively. The concurrent presence of fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, cough HP, and diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD in children TRANS, in absence of sore throat/ earache MESHD and abnormal skin signs, represents the maximum risk level of having a suspected/ confirmed case TRANS of COVID-19 at home. CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of children TRANS presenting COVID-19 like symptoms at home has been remarkable also during the total lockdown period. The present study identified a pattern of symptoms which could help, in a cost-effective perspective, PCPs in daily clinical practice to define priorities in addressing children TRANS to the proper diagnostic procedure.

    Digestive Manifestations in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19

    Authors: B. Joseph Elmunzer; Rebecca L. Spitzer; Lydia D. Foster; Ambreen A. Merchant; Eric F. Howard; Vaishali A. Patel; Mary K. West; Emad Qayad; Rosemary Nustas; Ali Zakaria; Marc S. Piper; Jason R. Taylor; Lujain Jaza; Nauzer Forbes; Millie Chau; Luis F. Lara; Georgios I. Papachristou; Michael L. Volk; Liam G. Hilson; Selena Zhou; Vladimir M. Kushnir; Alexandria M. Lenyo; Caroline G. McLeod; Sunil Amin; Gabriela N. Kuftinec; Dhiraj Yadav; Charlie Fox; Jennifer M. Kolb; Swati Pawa; Rishi Pawa; Andrew Canakis; Christopher Huang; Laith H. Jamil; Andrew M. Aneese; Benita K. Glamour; Zachary L. Smith; Katherine A. Hanley; Jordan Wood; Harsh K. Patel; Janak N. Shah; Emil Agarunov; Amrita Sethi; Evan L. Fogel; Gail McNulty; Abdul Haseeb; Judy A. Trieu; Rebekah E. Dixon; Jeong Yun Yang; Robin B. Mendelsohn; Delia Calo; Olga C. Aroniadis; Joseph F. LaComb; James M. Scheiman; Bryan G. Sauer; Duyen T. Dang; Cyrus R. Piraka; Eric D. Shah; Heiko Pohl; William M. Tierney; Stephanie Mitchell; Ashwinee Condon; Adrienne Lenhart; Kulwinder S. Dua; Vikram S. Kanagala; Ayesha Kamal; Vikesh K. Singh; Maria Ines Pinto-Sanchez; Joy M. Hutchinson; Richard S. Kwon; Sheryl J. Korsnes; Harminder Singh; Zahra Solati; Amar R. Deshpande; Don C. Rockey; Teldon B. Alford; Valerie Durkalski; Field F. Willingham; Patrick S. Yachimski; Darwin L. Conwell; Evan Mosier; Mohamed Azab; Anish Patel; James Buxbaum; Sachin Wani; Amitabh Chak; Amy E. Hosmer; Rajesh N. Keswani; Christopher J. DiMaio; Michael S. Bronze; Raman Muthusamy; Marcia I. Canto; V. Mihajlo Gjeorgjievski; Zaid Imam; Fadi Odish; Ahmed I. Edhi; Molly Orosey; Abhinav Tiwari; Soumil Patwardhan; Nicholas G. Brown; Anish A. Patel; Collins O. Ordiah; Ian P. Sloan; Lilian Cruz; Casey L. Koza; Uchechi Okafor; Thomas Hollander; Nancy Furey; Olga Reykhart; Natalia H. Zbib; John A. Damianos; James Esteban; Nick Hajidiacos; Melissa Saul; Melanie Mays; Gulsum Anderson; Kelley Wood; Laura Mathews; Galina Diakova; Molly Caisse; Lauren Wakefield; Haley Nitchie

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.07.20143024 Date: 2020-07-09 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The prevalence SERO and significance of digestive manifestations in COVID-19 remain uncertain. Methods: Consecutive patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were identified across a geographically diverse alliance of medical centers in North America. Data pertaining to baseline characteristics, symptomatology, laboratory assessment, imaging, and endoscopic findings from the time of symptom onset TRANS until discharge or death MESHD were manually abstracted from electronic health records to characterize the prevalence SERO, spectrum, and severity of digestive manifestations. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between digestive manifestations and severe outcomes related to COVID-19. Results: A total of 1992 patients across 36 centers met eligibility criteria and were included. Overall, 53% of patients experienced at least one gastrointestinal symptom at any time during their illness, most commonly diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD (34%), nausea HP nausea MESHD (27%), vomiting HP vomiting MESHD (16%), and abdominal pain HP abdominal pain MESHD (11%). In 74% of cases, gastrointestinal symptoms MESHD were judged to be mild. In total, 35% of patients developed an abnormal alanine aminotransferase or total bilirubin level; these were elevated to less than 5 times the upper limit of normal in 77% of cases. After adjusting for potential confounders, the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms at any time (odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.76-1.15) or liver test abnormalities on admission (odds ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 0.80-2.12) were not independently associated with mechanical ventilation or death MESHD. Conclusions: Among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, gastrointestinal symptoms MESHD and liver test abnormalities MESHD were common but the majority were mild and their presence was not associated with a more severe clinical course.

    Symptomatology of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) - Lessons from a meta-analysis across 13 countries

    Authors: Champika Saman Kumara Gamakaranage; Dineshani Hettiarachchi; Dileepa Ediriweera; Saroj Jayasinghe

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39412/v2 Date: 2020-07-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in varying clinical manifestations and mortality rates. There is no consensus on the symptomatology that would guide researchers and clinicians. Objective: The objective was to identify symptoms and their frequencies of COVID-19 with a meta-analysis of studies from several countries. Data sources: A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar data sources and reference tracing TRANS were used to identify 7176 articles. Eligibility criteria: Suitable articles were selected manually with selection criteria and 14 original articles included in meta-analysis. Data abstraction and analysis: PRISMA guidelines, used for data abstraction and a table was generated by feeding it with numbers and proportions of each symptom described. A meta-analysis was carried out using random effect models on each symptom separately across the studies and their prevalence SERO rates and 95% confident intervals were calculated.Results: Selected 14 studies, either cross-sectional or cohort studies are analyzed. There were 2,660 confirmed cases TRANS of COVID-19. The majority were from China (n=2,439, 91.7%) and remainder from the Netherlands, Italy, Korea and India and one article from Europe. There was a total of 32 symptoms identified from the meta-analysis and additional 7 symptoms were identified from reference searching. The most common symptoms were ( prevalence SERO >50%): fever HP fever MESHD (79.56%, 95% CI: 72.17-86.09%), malaise (63.3%, 95% CI: 53.1 – 73.0%), cough HP (56.7. %, 95% CI: 48.6 - 64.6 %) and cold (55.6%, 95% CI: 45.2 – 65.7%). Symptoms of intermediate incidence (5-49%) were; anosmia HP anosmia MESHD, sneezing HP, ocular pain HP ocular pain MESHD, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, sputum production, arthralgia HP arthralgia MESHD, tachypnea HP tachypnea MESHD, palpitation HP, headache HP headache MESHD, chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD, shortness of breath MESHD, chills HP, myalgia HP myalgia MESHD, sore throat, anorexia HP anorexia MESHD, weakness MESHD, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, rhinorrhea HP rhinorrhea MESHD, dizziness MESHD, nausea HP nausea MESHD, altered level of consciousness, vomiting HP vomiting MESHD and abdominal pain HP abdominal pain MESHD. Rare symptoms (<5%): tonsil swelling MESHD, haemoptysis, conjunctival injection, lymphadenopathy HP lymphadenopathy MESHD and rash MESHD. Conclusion and implications of key findings: We found (25/32, from meta-analysis) symptoms to be present in =>5% of cases which could be considered as “typical” symptoms of COVID-19. The list of symptoms we identified is different from those documents released by the WHO, CDC, NHS, Chinese CDC, Institute Pasteur and Mayo Clinic. The compiled list would be useful for future researchers to document a comprehensive picture of the illness.  

    Symptomatology of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) - Lessons from A Meta-Analysis Across 13 Countries

    Authors: Champika Saman Kumara Gamakaranage; Dineshani Hettiarachchi; Dileepa Ediriweera; Saroj Jayasinghe

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39412/v1 Date: 2020-07-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in varying clinical manifestations and mortality rates. There is no consensus on the symptomatology that would guide researchers and clinicians.Objective: The objective of the study was to identify symptoms and their frequencies of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 with a meta-analysis of studies from several countries. Data sources: A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar data sources and reference tracing TRANS were used to identify 7176 relevant articles. Eligibility criteria: Suitable articles were selected manually with selection criteria and 14 original articles included for meta-analysis. Data abstraction analysis: PRISMA guideline was used for abstracting data. Then a table was generated by feeding it with numbers and proportions of each symptom described in original studies. A meta-analysis was carried out using random effect models on each symptom separately across the studies and their prevalence SERO rates and 95% confident intervals calculated.Results: We identified 14 relevant scientific papers, either cross-sectional or cohort studies and analyzed. There were 2,660 cases of COVID-19. he majority were from China (n=2,439, 91.7%) and remainder from the Netherlands, Italy, Korea and India and one article from Europe. There was a total of 32 symptoms (i.e. present in >50% of patients):  fever MESHD (79.56%, 95% CI: 72.17-86.09%), malaise (63.3%, 95% CI: 53.1 – 73.0%), cough HP (56.7. %, 95% CI: 48.6 - 64.6 %) and cold (55.6%, 95% CI: 45.2 – 65.7%). Symptoms of intermediate incidence (5-49%) were; anosmia HP anosmia MESHD, sneezing HP, ocular pain HP ocular pain MESHD, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, sputum production, arthralgia HP arthralgia MESHD, tachypnea HP tachypnea MESHD, palpitation HP, headache HP headache MESHD, chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD, shortness of breath MESHD, chills HP, myalgia HP myalgia MESHD, sore throat, anorexia HP anorexia MESHD, weakness MESHD, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, rhinorrhea HP rhinorrhea MESHD, dizziness MESHD, nausea HP nausea MESHD, altered level of consciousness, vomiting HP vomiting MESHD and abdominal pain HP abdominal pain MESHD. Rare symptoms (<5% of patients) were: tonsil swelling, haemoptysis, conjunctival injection, lymphadenopathy HP lymphadenopathy MESHD and rash MESHD were uncommon symptoms of coronavirus disease MESHD (<5%).Conclusion and implications of key findings: We found (25/32) symptoms to be present in =>5% of cases which could be considered as “typical” symptoms of COVID-19. The list of symptoms we identified are different from those documents released by the WHO, CDC, NHS, Chinese CDC, Institute Pasteur and Mayo Clinic. The compiled list would be useful for future researchers to document a comprehensive picture of the illness.

    Isolation and Characterization of Coronavirus and Rotavirus Associated With Calves, in Central Part of Oromia MESHD, Ethiopia

    Authors: Umer Seid Geletu; Fufa Dawo Bari; Munera Ahmednur Usmael; Asamino Tesfaye

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39022/v1 Date: 2020-06-29 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Coronavirus and Rotavirus are most commonly associated etiologies for calves’ diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD resulting in loss of productivity and economy of farmers. However, various facets of diarrheal disease MESHD caused by coronavirus and rotavirus MESHD in calves in Ethiopia are inadequately understood.  A cross sectional study was conducted with the aim of isolation and molecular characterization of coronavirus and rotavirus from calves in central part of Oromia MESHD (Bishoftu, Sebata, Holeta and Addis Ababa), Ethiopia from November 2018 to May 2019. The four study areas were purposively selected and fecal samples were collected by simple random sampling for diagnosis of coronavirus and rotavirus infection MESHD by using antigen detection Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay SERO (Ag- ELISA SERO) kit. In addition, this study was carried out to have insight in prevalence SERO and associated risk factors of coronavirus and rotavirus infection MESHD in calves. Result: During the study 83 diarrheic and 162 non-diarrheic fecal samples collected from calves less than 4 weeks of age TRANS were screened for coronavirus and rotavirus MESHD. Of the 83 diarrheic samples, 1 sample (1.2%) was positive for coronavirus antigen (Ag) and 6 samples (7.2%) were found to be positive for rotavirus antigen (Ag) by Ag- ELISA SERO. All the non-diarrheic samples were negative for both coronavirus and rotavirus Ag. The overall prevalence SERO of coronavirus and rotavirus infection MESHD in calves were estimated as 0.4% (1/245) and 2.45% (6/245) respectively. All samples (7) of ELISA SERO test positive of both coronavirus and rotavirus MESHD were propagated in Madin Darby bovine kidney cells (MDBK). After 3 subsequent passages, progressive cytopathic effect (CPE) i.e. rounding, detachment as well as destruction of mono-layer cell of five sample (1 sample of coronavirus and 4 sample of rotavirus MESHD) (71.4%) were observed. At the molecular stage, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique was used to determine the presence of coronavirus and rotavirus nucleic acid by using specific primers. The 5 samples that were coronavirus and rotavirus antigen positive by ELISA SERO and develop CPE on cell culture were also positive on RT-PCR technique. Infection prevalence SERO peaked have been obtained at 1st and 2nd weeks of age TRANS in male TRANS calves. Conclusion: Diarrheal disease MESHD caused by coronavirus and rotavirus MESHD has a great health problem in calves that interrupts production benefits with reduced weight gain MESHD and increased mortality, and its potential for zoonotic spread. So the present findings show coronavirus and rotavirus infection MESHD in calves in Ethiopia that needs to be addressed by practicing early colostrums feeding in newborn calves, using vaccine, or improving livestock management.

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A systematic review and analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v2 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance.Aim: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19.Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2.Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease MESHD (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer MESHD (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease MESHD (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD MESHD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease MESHD (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms were fever HP fever MESHD (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP myalgia MESHD/ fatigue HP fatigue MESHD (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease MESHD, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD or chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD/ pain HP pain MESHD were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease MESHD, and coronary heart disease MESHD, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes MESHD and hypertension HP hypertension MESHD and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity. 

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A scoping review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v3 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance. Objectives: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19. Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s-test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2. Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms recorded during the course of admission were fever HP (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP/ fatigue HP (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP or chest tightness HP/ pain HP were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension HP and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity.

    Critical Complications of COVID-19: A systematic Review and Meta-Analysis study

    Authors: Kimia Vakili; Mobina Fathi; Fatemeh Sayehmiri; Ashraf Mohamadkhani; Mohammadreza Hajiesmaeili; Mostafa Rezaei-Tavirani; Aiyoub Pezeshgi

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.14.20130955 Date: 2020-06-16 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel coronavirus infection MESHD that has spread worldwide in a short period and caused a pandemic. The goal of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the prevalence SERO of most common symptoms and complications of COVID-19. Methods: All related studies assessing the clinical complications of COVID-19 have been identified through web search databases (PubMed and Scopus). Relevant data were extracted from these studies and analyzed by stata (ver 14) random-effects model. The heterogeneity of studies were assessed by I2 index. The publication bias was examined by Funnel plots and Eggers test. Results: 30 studies were in our meta-analysis including 6 389 infected MESHD patients. The prevalence SERO of most common symptoms were: fever HP 84.30% (95% CI: 77.13-90.37; I2=97.74%), cough HP 63.01% (95% CI: 57.63-68.23; I2=93.73%), dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD 37.16% (95% CI: 27.31-47.57%; I2=98.32%), fatigue HP fatigue MESHD 34.22% (95% CI: 26.29-42.62; I2=97.29%) and diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD 11.47 %(95% CI: 6.96-16.87; I2=95.58%), respectively. The most prevalent complications were acute respiratory distress HP syndrome (ARDS) 33.15% (95% CI: 23.35-43.73; I2=98.56%), acute cardiac injury 13.77% (95% CI: 9.66-18.45; I2=91.36%), arrhythmia HP 16.64% (95% CI: 9.34-25.5; I2=92.29%), heart failure 11.50% (95% CI: 3.45-22.83; I2=89.48%), and acute kidney injury HP (AKI) 8.40 %(95% CI: 5.15-12.31; I2=95.22%, respectively. According to our analysis, mortality rate of COVID-19 patients were 12.29% (95% CI: 6.20-19.99; I2=98.29%). Conclusion: We assessed the prevalence SERO of the main clinical complications of COVID-19 and found that after respiratory complications, cardiac and renal complications are the most common clinical complications of COVID-19.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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