Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (54)

Cough (41)

Pneumonia (38)

Headache (10)

Anosmia (8)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 429
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    Comparison of sixteen serological SARS-CoV-2 immunoassays SERO in sixteen clinical laboratories

    Authors: Lene Holm Harritshoej; Mikkel Gybel-Brask; Shoaib Afzal; Pia R. Kamstrup; Charlotte Svaerke Joergensen; Marianne K. Thomsen; Linda M. Hilsted; Lennart J. Friis-Hansen; Pal B. Szecsi; Lise Pedersen; Lene Nielsen; Cecilie B. Hansen; Peter Garred; Trine-Line Korsholm; Susan Mikkelsen; Kirstine O. Nielsen; Bjarne K. Moeller; Anne T. Hansen; Kasper K. Iversen; Pernille B. Nielsen; Rasmus B. Hasselbalch; Kamille Fogh; Jakob B. Norsk; Jonas H. Kristensen; Kristian Schoenning; Nikolai S. Kirkby; Alex C.Y. Nielsen; Lone H. Landsy; Mette Loftager; Dorte K. Holm; Anna C. Nilsson; Susanne G. Saekmose; Birgitte Grum-Svendsen; Bitten Aagaard; Thoeger G. Jensen; Dorte M. Nielsen; Henrik Ullum; Ram BC Dessau

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20165373 Date: 2020-08-02 Source: medRxiv

    Serological SARS-CoV-2 assays are needed to support clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. Recently, assays for the large-volume detection of total antibodies SERO (Ab) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M against SARS-CoV-2 antigens have been developed, but there are limited data on the diagnostic accuracy of these assays. This study was organized as a Danish national collaboration and included fifteen commercial and one in-house anti-SARS-CoV-2 assays in sixteen laboratories. Sensitivity SERO was evaluated using 150 serum samples SERO from individuals diagnosed with asymptomatic TRANS, mild or moderate nonhospitalized (n=129) or hospitalized (n=31) COVID-19, confirmed by nucleic acid amplification tests, collected 13-73 days from symptom onset TRANS. Specificity and cross-reactivity were evaluated in samples collected prior to the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic from > 586 blood SERO donors and patients with autoimmune diseases MESHD or CMV or EBV infections MESHD. Predefined specificity criteria of [≥]99% were met by all total-Ab and IgG assays except one (Diasorin/LiaisonXL-IgG 97.2%). The sensitivities SERO in descending order were: Wantai/ ELISA SERO total-Ab (96.7%), CUH/NOVO in-house ELISA SERO total-Ab (96.0%), Ortho/Vitros total-Ab (95.3%), YHLO/iFlash-IgG (94.0%), Ortho/Vitros-IgG (93.3%), Siemens/Atellica total-Ab (93.2%), Roche-Elecsys total-Ab (92.7%), Abbott-Architect-IgG (90.0%), Abbott/Alinity-IgG (median 88.0%), Diasorin/LiaisonXL-IgG (84.6%), Siemens/Vista total-Ab (81.0%), Euroimmun/ ELISA-IgG SERO (78.0%), and Snibe/Maglumi-IgG (median 78.0%). The IgM results were variable, but one assay (Wantai/ ELISA SERO-IgM) had both high sensitivity SERO (82.7%) and specificity (99%). The rate of seropositivity increased with time from symptom onset TRANS and symptom severity. In conclusion, predefined sensitivity SERO and specificity acceptance criteria of 90%/99%, respectively, for diagnostic use were met in five of six total-Ab and three of seven IgG assays.

    The relative infectiousness of asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infected persons compared with symptomatic individuals: A rapid scoping review.

    Authors: David Mc Evoy; Conor G McAloon; Aine B Collins; Kevin Hunt; Francis Butler; Andrew W Byrne; Miriam Casey; Ann Barber; John M Griffin; Elizabeth A Lane; Patrick Wall; Simon J More

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20165084 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review of estimates of the relative infectiousness of asymptomatic TRANS persons infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with symptomatic individuals. Design: Rapid scoping review of literature available until 8th April 2020. Setting: International studies on the infectiousness of individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2 Participants: Studies were selected for inclusion if they defined asymptomatics TRANS as a separate cohort distinct from pre-symptomatics and if they provided a quantitative measure of the infectiousness of asymptomatics TRANS relative to symptomatics. Primary outcome measures: The relative number of secondary cases TRANS produced by an average primary case TRANS, the relative probability of transmitting infection MESHD upon contact, and the degree of viral shedding. Results: Very few studies reported estimates of relative infectiousness of asymptomatic TRANS compared with symptomatic individuals. Significant differences exist in the definition of infectiousness. Viral shedding studies in general show no difference in shedding levels between symptomatic and asymptomatic TRANS individuals but are likely to be impacted by insufficient statistical power. Two contact tracing TRANS studies provided estimates of 0.7 and 1.0, but differences in approach and definition preclude comparison across the two studies. Finally, two modelling studies suggest a relative infectiousness of around 0.5 but one of these was more reflective of the infectiousness of undocumented rather than asymptomatic TRANS cases. Importantly, one contact tracing TRANS study showing a very low level of infectiousness of asymptomatic TRANS was not included in the analysis at this point due difficulties interpreting the reported findings. Conclusions: The present study highlights the need for additional studies in this area as a matter of urgency. For the purpose of epidemiological modelling, we cautiously suggest that at present, asymptomatics TRANS could be considered to have a degree of infectiousness which is about 0.40-0.70 that of symptomatics. However, it must be stressed that this suggestion comes from a very low evidence base and that estimates exist that are close to zero and close to 1.

    Modeling latent infection MESHD transmissions TRANS through biosocial stochastic dynamics

    Authors: Bosiljka Tadic; Roderick Melnik

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164491 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    The events of the recent SARS-CoV-02 epidemics have shown the importance of social factors, especially given the large number of asymptomatic TRANS cases that effectively spread the virus, which can cause a medical emergency MESHD to very susceptible individuals. Besides, the SARS-CoV-02 virus survives for several hours on different surfaces, where a new host can contract it with a delay. These passive modes of infection MESHD transmission TRANS remain an unexplored area for traditional mean-field epidemic models. Here, we design an agent-based model for simulations of infection MESHD transmission TRANS in an open system driven by the dynamics of social activity; the model takes into account the personal characteristics of individuals, as well as the survival time of the virus and its potential mutations. A growing bipartite graph embodies this biosocial process, consisting of active carriers TRANS (host) nodes that produce viral nodes during their infectious period TRANS. With its directed edges passing through viral nodes between two successive hosts, this graph contains complete information about the routes leading to each infected individual. We determine temporal fluctuations of the number of exposed and the number of infected individuals, the number of active carriers TRANS and active viruses at hourly resolution. The simulated processes underpin the latent infection MESHD transmissions TRANS, contributing significantly to the spread of the virus within a large time window. More precisely, being brought by social dynamics and exposed to the currently existing infection MESHD, an individual passes through the infectious state until eventually spontaneously recovers or otherwise is moves to a controlled hospital environment. Our results reveal complex feedback mechanisms that shape the dependence of the infection MESHD curve on the intensity of social dynamics and other sociobiological factors. In particular, the results show how the lockdown effectively reduces the spread of infection MESHD and how it increases again after the lockdown is removed. Furthermore, a reduced level of social activity but prolonged exposure of susceptible individuals have adverse effects. On the other hand, virus mutations that can gradually reduce the transmission TRANS rate by hopping to each new host along the infection MESHD path can significantly reduce the extent of the infection MESHD, but can not stop the spreading without additional social strategies. Our stochastic processes, based on graphs at the interface of biology and social dynamics, provide a new mathematical framework for simulations of various epidemic control strategies with high temporal resolution and virus traceability.

    Effect and safety of combination of interferon alpha-2b and gamma or interferon alpha-2b for negativization of SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA. Preliminary results of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Authors: Esquivel-Moynelo Idelsis; Perez-Escribano Jesus; Duncan-Robert Yaquelin; Vazque-Blonquist Dania; Bequet-Romero Monica; Baez-Rodriguez Lisandra; Castro-Rios Jesus; Cobas Cervantes Lisbeth; Page-Calvet Ernesto; Travieso-Perez Saily; Martinez-Suarez Claudia; Campa-Legra Ivan; Fernandez-Masso Julio Raul; Camacho-Rodriguez Hamlet; Diaz-Galvez Marisol; Sin-Mayor Adriana; Garcia-Sanchez Maura; Martinez-Martin Sara Maria; Alonso-Valdes Marel; Hernandez-Bernal Francisco; Nodarse-Cuni Hugo; Bello-Garcia Dianela; Beato-Canfuk Abrahan; Vizcaino-Cesar Mary Tania; Guillen-Nieto Gerardo; Muzio-Gonzalez Verena; Bello-Rivero Iraldo

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164251 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Objectives: IFN-alpha2b and IFN-gamma combination has demonstrated favorable pharmacodynamics for genes underlying antiviral activity which might be involved in the defense of the organism from a SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Considering this we conducted a randomized controlled clinical trial for efficacy and safety evaluation of subcutaneous IFN-alpha2b and IFN-gamma administration in patients positive to SARS-CoV-2. Methods: We enrolled 19-82 years-old inpatients at the Military Central Hospital Luis Diaz Soto, Havana, Cuba. They were hospitalized after confirmed diagnosis for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either, subcutaneous treatment with a co-lyophilized combination of 3.0 MIU IFN-alpha2b and 0.5 MIU IFN-gamma (HeberFERON, CIGB, Havana, Cuba), twice a week for two weeks, or thrice a week intramuscular injection of 3.0 MIU IFN-alpha2b (Heberon Alpha R, CIGB, Havana, Cuba). Additionally, all patients received lopinavir-ritonavir 200/50 mg every 12 h and chloroquine 250 mg every 12 h (standard of care). The primary endpoints were the time to negativization of viral RNA and the time to progression to severe COVID-19, from the start of treatment. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee on Clinical Investigation from the Hospital and the Center for the State Control of Medicines, Equipment and Medical Devices in Cuba. Informed consent was obtained from each participant. Results: A total of 79 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, including symptomatic or asymptomatic TRANS conditions, fulfilled the inclusion criteria and underwent randomization. Thirty-three subjects were assigned to the HeberFERON group, and 33 to the Heberon Alpha R group. Sixty-three patients were analyzed for viral negativization, of them 78.6% in the HeberFERON group negativized the virus after 4 days of treatment versus 40.6% of patients in the Heberon Alpha R groups (p=0.004). Time to reach the negativization of the SARS-CoV-2 measured by RT-PCR in real time was of 3.0 and 5.0 days for the HeberFERON and Heberon Alpha R groups, respectively. A significant improvement in the reduction of time for negativization was attributable to HeberFERON (p=0.0027, Log-rank test) with a Hazard Ratio of 3.2 and 95% CI of 1.529 to 6.948, as compared to Heberon Alpha R treated group. Worsening of respiratory symptoms was detected in two (6.6%) and one (3.3%) patients in HeberFERON and IFN-alpha2b groups, respectively. None of the subjects transit to severe COVID-19 during the study or the epidemiological follow-up for 21 more days. RT-PCR on day 14 after the start of the treatment was negative to SARS-CoV-2 in 100% and 91% of patients of the combination of IFNs and IFN-alpha2b, respectively. Negativization for HeberFERON treated patients was related to a significant increase in lymphocytes counts and an also significant reduction in CRP as early as 7 days after commencing the therapeutic schedule. All the patients in both cohorts recover by day 14 and were in asymptomatic TRANS condition and laboratory parameters return to normal values by day 14 after treatment initiation. Adverse events were identified in 31.5% of patients, 28.5% in the control group, and 34.4% in the HeberFERON group, and the most frequent were headaches MESHD headaches HP (17.4%). Conclusions: In a cohort of 63 hospitalized patients between 19 to 82 years-old with positive SARS-CoV-2, HeberFERON significantly negativized the virus on day 4 of treatment when comparing with IFN-alpha2b. Heberon Alpha R also showed efficacy for the treatment of the viral infection MESHD. Both treatments were safe and positively impact on the resolution of the symptoms. None of the patients developed severe COVID-19. Key words: COVID-19, treatment, drug, virus negativization, antiviral, interferon combination, SARS CoV-2.

    High SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Health Care Workers but relatively low numbers of deaths MESHD in urban Malawi

    Authors: Marah Grace Chibwana; Khuzwayo Chidiwa Jere; Jonathan Mandolo; Vincent Katunga-Phiri; Dumizulu Tembo; Ndaona Mitole; Samantha Musasa; Simon Sichone; Agness Lakudzala; Lusako Sibale; Prisca Matambo; Innocent Kadwala; Rachel Louise Byrne; Alice Mbewe; Ben Morton; Chimota Phiri; Jane Mallewa; Henry C Mwandumba; Emily R Adams; Stephen B Gordon; Kondwani Charles Jambo

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164970 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background In low-income countries, like Malawi, important public health measures including social distancing or a lockdown, have been challenging to implement owing to socioeconomic constraints, leading to predictions that the COVID-19 pandemic would progress rapidly. However, due to limited capacity to test for severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD, there are no reliable estimates of the true burden of infection MESHD and death MESHD. We, therefore, conducted a SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey amongst health care workers (HCW) in Blantyre city to estimate the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in urban Malawi. Methods Five hundred otherwise asymptomatic TRANS HCWs were recruited from Blantyre City (Malawi) from 22nd May 2020 to 19th June 2020 and serum samples SERO were collected all participants. A commercial ELISA SERO was used to measure SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in serum SERO. We run local negative samples (2018 - 2019) to verify the specificity of the assay. To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV-2 antibodies SERO, we adjusted the proportion of positive results based on local specificity of the assay. Results Eighty-four participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The HCW with a positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO result came from different parts of the city. The adjusted seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO was 12.3% [CI 9.0-15.7]. Using age TRANS-stratified infection MESHD fatality estimates reported from elsewhere, we found that at the observed adjusted seroprevalence SERO, the number of predicted deaths MESHD was 8 times the number of reported deaths MESHD. Conclusion The high seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO among HCW and the discrepancy in the predicted versus reported deaths MESHD, suggests that there was early exposure but slow progression of COVID-19 epidemic in urban Malawi. This highlights the urgent need for development of locally parameterised mathematical models to more accurately predict the trajectory of the epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa for better evidence-based policy decisions and public health response planning.

    Throat wash as a source of SARS-CoV-2 RNA to monitor community spread of COVID-19.

    Authors: Giselle Ibette Silva Lopez-Lopes; Cintia Mayumi Ahagon; Margarete Aparecida Bonega; Fabiana Pereira dos Santos; Katia Correa de Oliveira Santos; Audrey Cilli; Lincoln Spinazola do Prado; Daniela Bernardes Borges da Silva; Nuria Borges da Luz; Claudia Patara Saraceni; Ana Maria Sardinha Afonso; Maria do Carmo Timenetsky; Luis Fernando de Macedo Brigido

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20163998 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection with real time PCR is currently the central diagnostic tool to determine ongoing active infection MESHD. Nasopharyngeal and oral swabs are the main collection tool of biological material used as the source of viral RNA outside a hospital setting. However, limitation in swabs availability, trained health professional with proper PPE and potential risk of aerosols may hinder COVID diagnosis. Self-collection with swabs, saliva and throat wash to obtain oropharyngeal wash has been suggested as having comparable performance SERO of regular swab. We performed throat wash (TW) based surveillance with laboratory heath workers and other employees (LHW) at a laboratory research institute. Methods: Consecutive volunteer testing of LWH and external household and close contacts TRANS were included. TW self-collection was performed in 5 mL of sterile saline that was returned to original vial after approximate 5 secs of gargle. RNA extraction and rtPCR were performed as part of routine COVID protocols using Allplex (Seegene, Korea). Results: Four hundred and twenty two volunteers, 387 (93%) LHW and 43 (7%) contacts participated in the survey. One or more positive COVID rtPCR was documented in 63 (14.9% CI95 12%-19%) individuals. No correlation was observed between with direct activities with COVID samples to positivity, with infection MESHD observed in comparable rates among different laboratory areas, administrative or supportive activities. Among 63 with detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA, 59 with clinical information, 58% reported symptoms at a median of 4 days prior to collection, most with mild disease MESHD. Over a third (38%) of asymptomatic TRANS cases developed symptoms 1-3 days after collection. Although overall CT values of TW were higher than that of contemporary swab tests from hospitalized cases, TW from symptomatic cases had comparable CTs. Conclusions: The study suggests that TW may be a valid alternative to the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The proportion of asymptomatic TRANS and pre-symptomatic cases is elevated and reinforces the need of universal precautions and frequent surveys to limit the spread of the disease TRANS disease MESHD.

    Household transmission TRANS of SARS-CoV-2: a systematic review and meta-analysis of secondary attack rate TRANS

    Authors: Zachary J. Madewell; Yang Yang; Ira M. Longini Jr.; M. Elizabeth Halloran; Natalie E. Dean

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164590 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spread by direct, indirect, or close contact TRANS with infected people via infected respiratory droplets or saliva. Crowded indoor environments with sustained close contact TRANS and conversations are a particularly high-risk setting. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis through July 29, 2020 of SARS-CoV-2 household secondary attack rate TRANS ( SAR TRANS), disaggregating by several covariates (contact type, symptom status, adult TRANS/ child TRANS contacts, contact sex, relationship to index case, index case sex, number of contacts in household TRANS, coronavirus). Findings: We identified 40 relevant published studies that report household secondary transmission TRANS. The estimated overall household SAR TRANS was 18.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.4%-22.2%), which is higher than previously observed SARs for SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. We observed that household SARs were significantly higher from symptomatic index cases than asymptomatic TRANS index cases, to adult TRANS contacts than children TRANS contacts, to spouses than other family contacts, and in households TRANS with one contact than households TRANS with three or more contacts. Interpretation: To prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2, people are being asked to stay at home worldwide. With suspected or confirmed infections TRANS infections MESHD referred to isolate at home, household transmission TRANS will continue to be a significant source of transmission TRANS.

    Estimates of the rate of infection and asymptomatic MESHD asymptomatic TRANS COVID-19 disease MESHD in a population sample from SE England

    Authors: Philippa M Wells; Katie M Doores; Simon Couvreur; Rocio Martin Martinez; Jeffrey Seow; Carl Graham; Sam Acors; Neophytos Kouphou; Stuart Neil; Richard Tedder; Pedro Matos; Kate Poulton; Maria Jose Lista; Ruth Dickenson; Helin Sertkaya; Thomas Maguire; Edward Scourfield; Ruth Bowyer; Deborah Hart; Aoife O'Byrne; Kathryn Steele; Oliver Hemmings; Carolina Rosadas; Myra McClure; Joan Capedevila-Pujol; Jonathan wolf; Sebastien Ourseilin; Matthew Brown; Michael Malim; Timothy Spector; Claire Steves

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20162701 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Understanding of the true asymptomatic TRANS rate of infection MESHD of SARS-CoV-2 is currently limited, as is understanding of the population-based seroprevalence SERO after the first wave of COVID-19 within the UK. The majority of data thus far come from hospitalised patients, with little focus on general population cases, or their symptoms. Methods: We undertook enzyme linked immunosorbent assay SERO characterisation of IgM and IgG responses against SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of 431 unselected general-population participants of the TwinsUK cohort from South-East England, aged TRANS 19-86 (median age TRANS 48; 85% female TRANS). 382 participants completed prospective logging of 14 COVID-19 related symptoms via the COVID Symptom Study App, allowing consideration of serology alongside individual symptoms, and a predictive algorithm for estimated COVID-19 previously modelled on PCR positive individuals from a dataset of over 2 million. Findings: We demonstrated a seroprevalence SERO of 12% (51participants of 431). Of 48 seropositive individuals with full symptom data, nine (19%) were fully asymptomatic TRANS, and 16 (27%) were asymptomatic TRANS for core COVID-19 symptoms: fever MESHD fever HP, cough MESHD cough HP or anosmia HP. Specificity of anosmia HP for seropositivity was 95%, compared to 88% for fever MESHD fever HP cough MESHD cough HP and anosmia HP combined. 34 individuals in the cohort were predicted to be Covid-19 positive using the App algorithm, and of those, 18 (52%) were seropositive. Interpretation: Seroprevalence SERO amongst adults TRANS from London and South-East England was 12%, and 19% of seropositive individuals with prospective symptom logging were fully asymptomatic TRANS throughout the study. Anosmia HP demonstrated the highest symptom specificity for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO response. Funding: NIHR BRC, CDRF, ZOE global LTD, RST-UKRI/MRC

    Disease MESHD severity dictates SARS-CoV-2-specific neutralizing antibody SERO responses in COVID-19

    Authors: Xiangyu Chen; Zhiwei Pan; Shuai Yue; Fei Yu; Junsong Zhang; Yang Yang; Ren Li; Bingfeng Liu; Xiaofan Yang; Leiqiong Gao; Zhirong Li; Yao Lin; Qizhao Huang; Lifan Xu; Jianfang Tang; Li Hu; Jing Zhao; Pinghuang Liu; Guozhong Zhang; Yaokai Chen; Kai Deng; Lilin Ye

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164285 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    COVID-19 patients exhibit differential disease MESHD severity after SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. It is currently unknown as to the correlation between the magnitude of neutralizing antibody SERO (NAb) responses and the disease MESHD severity in COVID-19 patients. In a cohort of 59 recovered patients with disease MESHD severity including severe, moderate, mild and asymptomatic TRANS, we observed the positive correlation between serum SERO neutralizing capacity and disease MESHD severity, in particular, the highest NAb capacity in sera from the patients with severe disease MESHD, while a lack of ability of asymptomatic TRANS patients to mount competent NAbs. Furthermore, the compositions of NAb subtypes were also different between recovered patients with severe symptoms and with mild-to-moderate symptoms. These results reveal the tremendous heterogeneity of SARS-CoV-2-specific NAb responses and their correlations to disease MESHD severity, highlighting the needs of future vaccination in COVID-19 patients recovered from asymptomatic TRANS or mild illness.

    EUAdb: a resource for COVID-19 test development

    Authors: Alyssa Woronik; Henry W Shaffer; Karin Kiontke; Jon M Laurent; Ronald Zambrano; Jef D Boeke; David H.A. Fitch

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.228890 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: bioRxiv

    Due to the sheer number of COVID-19 ( coronavirus disease MESHD 2019) cases, the prevalence SERO of asymptomatic TRANS cases and the fact that undocumented cases appear to be significant for transmission TRANS of the causal virus, SARS-CoV-2 ( severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2), there is an urgent need for increased SARS-CoV-2 testing capability that is both efficient and effective1. In response to the growing threat of the COVID-19 pandemic in February, 2020, the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) began issuing Emergency MESHD Use Authorizations (EUAs) to laboratories and commercial manufacturers for the development and implementation of diagnostic tests1. So far, the gold standard assay for SARS-CoV-2 detection is the RT-qPCR (real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction) test2. However, the authorized RT-qPCR test protocols vary widely, not only in the reagents, controls, and instruments they use, but also in the SARS-CoV-2 genes they target, what results constitute a positive SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, and their limit of detection (LoD). The FDA has provided a web site that lists most of the tests that have been issued EUAs, along with links to the authorization letters and summary documents describing these tests1. However, it is very challenging to use this site to compare or replicate these tests for a variety of reasons. First, at least 12 of 18 tests that were issued EUAs prior to March 31, 2020, are not listed there. Second, the data are not standardized and are only provided as longhand prose in the summary documents. Third, some details (e.g. primer sequences) are absent from several of the test descriptions. Fourth, for tests provided by commercial manufacturers, summary documents are completely missing. To address at least the first three issues, we have developed a database, EUAdb (EUAdb.org), that holds standardized information about EUA-issued tests and is focused on RT-qPCR diagnostic tests, or "high complexity molecular-based laboratory developed tests"1. By providing a standardized ontology and curated data in a relational architecture, we seek to facilitate comparability and reproducibility, with the ultimate goal of consistent, universal and high-quality testing nationwide. Here, we document the basics of the EUAdb data architecture and simple data queries. The source files can be provided to anyone who wants to modify the database for his/her own research purposes. We ask that the original source of the files be made clear and that the database not be used in its original or modified forms for commercial purposes.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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