Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

There are no transmission terms in the subcorpus


Seroprevalence
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    Association between Alzheimer's disease MESHD and COVID-19: A bidirectional Mendelian randomization

    Authors: Di Liu; Xiaoyu Zhang; Weijie Cao; Jie Zhang; Manshu Song; Weijia Xing; Wei Wang; Qun Meng; Youxin Wang

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.27.20163212 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background In observational studies, Alzheimer's disease MESHD ( AD MESHD) has been associated with an increased risk of Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19), and the prognosis of COVID-19 can affect nervous systems. However, the causality between these conditions remains to be determined. Methods This study sought to investigate the bidirectional causal relations of AD MESHD with COVID-19 using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. Results We found that genetically predicted AD MESHD was significantly associated with higher risk of severe COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR], 3.329; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.139-9.725; P=0.028). It's interesting that genetically predicted severe COVID-19 was also significantly associated with higher risk of AD MESHD (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.001-1.007; P=0.018). In addition, the two strong genetic variants associated with severe COVID-19 was associated with higher AD MESHD risk (OR, 1.018; 95% CI, 1.003-1.034; P=0.018). There is no evidence to support that genetically predicted AD MESHD was significantly associated with COVID-19 susceptibility, and vice versa. No obvious pleiotropy bias and heterogeneity were observed. Conclusion Overall, AD MESHD may causally affect severe COVID-19, and vice versa, performing bidirectional regulation through independent biological pathways.

    Changes in Cause-of-Death Attribution During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Association with Hospital Quality Metrics and Implications for Future Research

    Authors: Kathleen A. Fairman; Kellie J. Goodlet; James D. Rucker

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.25.20162198 Date: 2020-07-28 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) is often comorbid with conditions subject to quality metrics (QM) used for hospital performance SERO assessment and rate-setting. Although diagnostic coding change in response to financial incentives is well documented, no study has examined the association of QM with SARS-CoV-2 cause-of-death attribution (CODA). Calculations of excess all-cause deaths overlook the importance of accurate CODA and of distinguishing policy-related from virus-related mortality. Objective: Examine CODA, overall and for QM and non-QM diagnoses, in 3 pandemic periods: awareness (January 19-March 14), height (March 15-May 16), and late (May 17-June 20). Methods: Retrospective analysis of publicly available national weekly COD data, adjusted for population growth and reporting lags, October 2014-June 20, 2020. CODA in 5 pre-pandemic influenza seasons was compared with 2019-20. Suitability of the data to distinguish policy-related from virus-related effects was assessed. Results: Following federal guidance permitting SARS-CoV-2 CODA without laboratory testing, mortality from the QM diagnoses cancer MESHD and chronic lower respiratory disease MESHD declined steadily relative to prior-season means, reaching 4.4% less and 12.1% less, respectively, in late pandemic. Deaths for non-QM diagnoses increased, by 21.0% for Alzheimers disease HP Alzheimers disease MESHD and 29.0% for diabetes MESHD during pandemic height. Increases in competing CODs over historical experience, suggesting SARS-CoV-2 underreporting, more than offset declines during pandemic height. However, in the late-pandemic period, declines MESHD slightly numerically exceeded increases, suggesting SARS-CoV-2 overreporting. In pandemic-height and late-pandemic periods, respectively, only 83.5% and 69.7% of increases in all-cause deaths MESHD were explained by changes in the reported CODs, including SARS-CoV-2, preventing assessment of policy-related mortality or of factors contributing to increased all-cause deaths MESHD. Conclusions: Substitution of SARS-CoV-2 for competing CODs may have occurred, particularly for QM diagnoses and late in the pandemic. Continued monitoring of these trends, qualitative research on pandemic CODA, and the addition of place-of-death data and psychiatric CODs MESHD to the file would facilitate assessment of policy-related and virus-related effects on mortality.

    Deaths from Covid-19: Who are the forgotten victims?

    Authors: Kieran Docherty; Jawad Butt; Rudolf de Boer; Pooja Dewan; Lars Koeber; Aldo Maggioni; John McMurray; Scott Solomon; Pardeep Singh Jhund

    doi:10.1101/2020.04.21.20073114 Date: 2020-04-24 Source: medRxiv

    Background: With the global pandemic of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (Covid-19) there has been disruption to normal clinical activity in response to the increased demand on health services. There are reports of a reduction in non-Covid-19 emergency presentations. Consequentially, there are concerns that deaths from non-Covid-19 causes could increase. We examined recent reported population-based mortality rates, compared with expected rates, and compared any excess in deaths MESHD with the number of deaths attributed to Covid-19. Methods: National agency and death MESHD registration reports were searched for numbers of deaths attributed to Covid-19 and overall mortality that had been publicly reported by 06 May 2020. Data on the number of deaths attributed to Covid-19, the total number of deaths registered in the population and the historical average over at least 3 years were collected. Data were available for 4 European countries (England & Wales, Scotland, Netherlands and Italy) and New York State, United States of America. Results: There was an increase in observed, compared with expected, mortality in Scotland (+68%), England and Wales (+74%), the Netherlands (+58%), Italy (+39%) and New York state (+49%). Of these deaths, only 73% in Scotland, 71 % in England and Wales, 53% in the Netherlands, 54% in Italy and 79% in New York state were attributed to Covid-19 leaving a number of excess deaths not attributed to Covid-19. In the 5-week period of study, Scotland, 10% of the excess of deaths were attributed to dementia HP dementia MESHD/ Alzheimers disease HP and 7% to cardiovascular causes. Conclusion: A substantial proportion of excess deaths observed during the current COVID-19 pandemic are not attributed to COVID-19 and may represent unrecognised deaths due to Covid-19, an excess of deaths due to other causes, or both. The impact of Covid-19 on mortality and morbidity from other causes needs to be quantified and addressed in public health planning.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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