Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence

There are no seroprevalence terms in the subcorpus

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    OpenSAFELY: Do adults TRANS prescribed Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have an increased risk of death from COVID-19?

    Authors: Angel YS Wong; Brian MacKenna; Caroline Morton; Anna Schultze; Alex J Walker; Krishnan Bhaskaran; Jeremy Brown; Christopher T. Rentsch; Elizabeth Williamson; Henry Drysdale; Richard Croker; Seb Bacon; William Hulme; Chris Bates; Helen J Curtis; Amir Mehrkar; David Evans; Peter Inglesby; Jonathan Cockburn; Helen McDonald; Laurie Tomlinson; Rohini Mathur; Kevin Wing; Harriet Forbes; John Parry; Frank Hester; Sam Harper; Stephen Evans; Liam Smeeth; Ian Douglas; Ben Goldacre

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.12.20171405 Date: 2020-08-14 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: There has been speculation that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may negatively affect coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes, yet clinical evidence is limited. Objective: To assess the association between NSAID use and deaths from COVID-19 using OpenSAFELY, a secure analytical platform. Design: Two cohort studies (1st March-14th June 2020). Setting: Working on behalf of NHS England, we used routine clinical data from >17 million patients in England linked to death data from the Office for National Statistics. Participants: Study 1: General population (people with an NSAID prescription in the last three years). Study 2: people with rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD/ osteoarthritis HP osteoarthritis MESHD. Exposures: Current NSAID prescription within the 4 months before 1st March 2020. Main Outcome and Measure: We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for COVID-19 related death in people currently prescribed NSAIDs, compared with those not currently prescribed NSAIDs, adjusting for age TRANS, sex, comorbidities and other medications. Results: In Study 1, we included 535,519 current NSAID users and 1,924,095 non-users in the general population. The crude HR for current use was 1.25 (95% CI, 1.07-1.46), versus non-use. We observed no evidence of difference in risk of COVID-19 related death associated with current use (HR, 0.95, 95% CI, 0.80-1.13) in the fully adjusted model. In Study 2, we included 1,711,052 people with rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD/ osteoarthritis HP osteoarthritis MESHD, of whom 175,631 (10%) were current NSAID users. The crude HR for current use was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.36-0.52), versus non-use. In the fully adjusted model, we observed a lower risk of COVID-19 related death (HR, 0.78, 95% CI, 0.65-0.94) associated with current use of NSAID versus non-use. Conclusion and Relevance: We found no evidence of a harmful effect of NSAIDs on COVID-19 related deaths. Risks from COVID-19 do not need to influence decisions about therapeutic use of NSAIDs.

    Factors Associated with Hospitalization and Disease Severity in a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Population of COVID-19 Patients

    Authors: Angelico Mendy; Senu Apewokin; Anjanette A Wells; Ardythe L Morrow

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.25.20137323 Date: 2020-06-26 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The coronavirus disease MESHD (COVID-19) first identified in Wuhan in December 2019 became a pandemic within a few months of its discovery. The impact of COVID-19 is due to both its rapid spread and its severity, but the determinants of severity have not been fully delineated. Objective: Identify factors associated with hospitalization and disease severity in a racially and ethnically diverse cohort of COVID-19 patients. Methods: We analyzed data from COVID-19 patients diagnosed at the University of Cincinnati health system from March 13, 2020 to May 31, 2020. Severe COVID-19 was defined as admission to intensive care unit or death MESHD. Logistic regression modeling adjusted for covariates was used to identify the factors associated with hospitalization and severe COVID-19. Results: Among the 689 COVID-19 patients included in our study, 29.2% were non-Hispanic White, 25.5% were non-Hispanic Black, 32.5% were Hispanic, and 12.8% were of other race/ethnicity. About 31.3% of patients were hospitalized and 13.2% had severe disease. In adjusted analyses, the sociodemographic factors associated with hospitalization and/or disease severity included older age TRANS, non-Hispanic Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity (compared to non-Hispanic White), and smoking. The following comorbidities: diabetes MESHD, hypercholesterolemia HP hypercholesterolemia MESHD, asthma HP asthma MESHD, COPD MESHD, chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD, cardiovascular diseases MESHD, osteoarthritis HP osteoarthritis MESHD, and vitamin D deficiency MESHD were associated with hospitalization and/or disease severity. Hematological disorders MESHD such as anemia HP anemia MESHD, coagulation disorders MESHD, and thrombocytopenia HP thrombocytopenia MESHD were associated with both hospitalization and disease severity. Conclusion: This study confirms race and ethnicity as predictors of severe COVID-19. It also finds clinical risk factors for hospitalization and severe COVID-19 not previously identified such a vitamin D deficiency MESHD, hypercholesterolemia HP hypercholesterolemia MESHD, osteoarthritis HP osteoarthritis MESHD, and anemia HP anemia MESHD.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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