Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (12)

Pneumonia (8)

Anosmia (6)

Cough (5)

Dyspnea (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 104
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    High prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in care homes affected by COVID-19; a prospective cohort study in England

    Authors: Shamez N Ladhani; Anna J Jeffery-Smith; Monika Patel; Roshni Janarthanan; Jonathan Fok; Emma Crawley-Boevey; Amoolya Vusirikala; Elena Fernandez; Marina Sanchez-Perez; Suzanne Tang; Kate Dun-Campbell; Edward Wynne-Evans; Anita Bell; Bharat Patel; Zahin Amin-Chowdhury; Felicity Aiano; Karthik Paranthaman; Thomas Ma; Maria Saavedra-Campos; Joanna Ellis; Meera Chand; Kevin Brown; Mary E Ramsay; Susan Hopkins; Nandini Shetty; J Yimmy Chow; Robin Gopal; Maria Zambon

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171413 Date: 2020-08-12 Source: medRxiv

    Background: We investigated six London care homes experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak and found very high rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD among residents and staff. Here we report follow-up serological analysis in these care homes five weeks later. Methods: Residents and staff had a convalescent blood SERO sample for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO levels and neutralising antibodies SERO by SARS-COV-2 RT-PCR five weeks after the primary COVID-19 outbreak investigation. Results: Of the 518 residents and staff in the initial investigation, 208/241 (86.3%) surviving residents and 186/254 (73.2%) staff underwent serological testing SERO. Almost all SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR positive residents and staff were antibody SERO positive five weeks later, whether symptomatic (residents 35/35, 100%; staff, 22/22, 100%) or asymptomatic TRANS (residents 32/33, 97.0%; staff 21/22, 95.1%). Symptomatic but SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR negative residents and staff also had high seropositivity rates (residents 23/27, 85.2%; staff 18/21, 85.7%), as did asymptomatic TRANS RT-PCR negative individuals (residents 62/92, 67.3%; staff 95/143, 66.4%). Neutralising antibody SERO was present in 118/132 (89.4%) seropositive individuals and was not associated with age TRANS or symptoms. Ten residents (10/108, 9.3%) remained RT-PCR positive, but with lower RT-PCR cycle threshold values; all 7 tested were seropositive. New infections MESHD were detected in three residents and one staff member. Conclusions: RT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 significantly underestimates the true extent of an outbreak in institutional settings. Elderly TRANS frail residents and younger healthier staff were equally able to mount robust and neutralizing antibody SERO responses to SARS-CoV-2. More than two-thirds of residents and staff members had detectable antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 irrespective of their nasal swab RT-PCR positivity or symptoms status.

    Low awareness of past SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in healthy adults TRANS

    Authors: Katja van den Hurk; Eva-Maria Merz; Femmeke J. Prinsze; Marloes L.C. Spekman; Franke A. Quee; Steven Ramondt; Ed Slot; Hans Vrielink; Elisabeth M.J. Huis in 't Veld; Hans L. Zaaijer; Boris M. Hogema

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171561 Date: 2020-08-12 Source: medRxiv

    Background The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic challenges governments worldwide to balance appropriate virus control measures and their societal and economic consequences. These control measures include the identification, isolation and testing of potentially infected individuals. As this relies on an individual's awareness of infection MESHD, we investigated the extent to which healthy adults TRANS suspected having had COVID-19, and how COVID-19 suspicion and symptoms relate to antibodies SERO indicative of a past infection MESHD infection with the severe HP with the severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Methods and findings Individuals donating plasma SERO anywhere in the Netherlands between May 11th and 18th were screened for total SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using ELISA SERO and invited to participate in an online questionnaire about COVID-19-related symptoms and awareness. Antibody SERO and questionnaire data were complete for 3,676 individuals, including 239 (6.5%) that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Here, we show that a 38% of the individuals that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO reported having had no or only very mild symptoms at any time during the peak of the epidemic. The loss of taste and/or smell in particular was significantly associated with seropositivity, independent of age TRANS and sex. Forty-eight percent of antibody SERO-positive persons did not suspect having had COVID-19, in spite of most of them reporting symptoms. Conclusions Awareness of infection MESHD was low among individuals that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, even at the peak of the epidemic. Improved awareness and recognition of COVID-19 symptoms and tracing TRANS of asymptomatic TRANS contacts is crucial to halting SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS.

    High prevalence SERO of symptoms among Brazilian subjects with antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2: a nationwide household survey

    Authors: Ana Maria Baptista Menezes; Cesar G Victora; Fernando P Hartwig; Mariangela F Silveira; Bernardo L Horta; Aluisio J D Barros; Fernando C Whermeister; Marilia A Mesenburg; Lucia C Pellanda; Odir A Dellagostin; Claudio J Struchiner; Marcelo N Burattini; Fernando C Barros; Pedro C Hallal

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171942 Date: 2020-08-12 Source: medRxiv

    Since the beginning of the pandemic of COVID-19, there has been a widespread assumption that most infected persons are asymptomatic TRANS. A frequently-cited early study from China suggested that 86% of all infections MESHD were undocumented, which was used as indirect evidence that patients were asymptomatic TRANS. Using data from the most recent wave of the EPICOVID19 study, a nationwide household-based survey including 133 cities from all states of Brazil, we estimated the proportion of people with and without antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 SERO who were asymptomatic TRANS, which symptoms were most frequently reported, the number of symptoms reported and the association between symptomatology and socio-demographic characteristics. We were able to test 33,205 subjects using a rapid antibody test SERO that was previously validated. Information on symptoms was collected before participants received the test result. Out of 849 (2.7%) participants who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, only 12.1% (95%CI 10.1-14.5) reported no symptoms since the start of the pandemic, compared to 42.2% (95%CI 41.7-42.8) among those who tested negative. The largest difference between the two groups was observed for changes in smell or taste (56.5% versus 9.1%, a 6.2-fold difference). Symptoms change in smell or taste, fever MESHD fever HP and myalgia MESHD myalgia HP were most likely to predict positive test results as suggested by recursive partitioning tree analysis. Among individuals without any of these three symptoms (74.2% of the sample), only 0.8% tested positive, compared to 18.3% of those with both fever MESHD fever HP and changes in smell or taste. Most subjects with antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in Brazil are symptomatic, even though most present only mild symptoms.

    The effectiveness of tests to detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2 virus, and antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO, to inform COVID-19 diagnosis: a rapid systematic review

    Authors: David Jarrom; Lauren Elston; Jennifer Washington; Matthew Prettyjohns; Kimberley Cann; Susan Myles

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171777 Date: 2020-08-11 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: We undertook a rapid systematic review with the aim of identifying evidence that could be used to answer the following research questions: (1) What is the clinical effectiveness of tests that detect the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to inform COVID-19 diagnosis? (2) What is the clinical effectiveness of tests that detect the presence of antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 SERO virus to inform COVID-19 diagnosis? Design: systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of diagnostic test accuracy. We systematically searched for all published evidence on the effectiveness of tests for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 virus, or antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO, up to 4 May 2020, and assessed relevant studies for risks of bias using the QUADAS-2 framework. Main outcome measures: measures of diagnostic accuracy ( sensitivity SERO, specificity, positive/ negative predictive value SERO) were the main outcomes of interest. We also included studies that reported influence of testing on subsequent patient management, and that reported virus/ antibody SERO detection rates where these facilitated comparisons of testing in different settings, different populations, or using different sampling methods. Results: 38 studies on SARS-CoV-2 virus testing and 25 studies on SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO testing were identified. We identified high or unclear risks of bias in the majority of studies, most commonly as a result of unclear methods of patient selection and test conduct, or because of the use of a reference standard that may not definitively diagnose COVID-19. The majority were in hospital settings, in patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infection MESHD. Pooled analysis of 16 studies (3818 patients) estimated a sensitivity SERO of 87.8% (95% confidence interval 81.5% to 92.2%) for an initial reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test. For antibody tests SERO, ten studies reported diagnostic accuracy outcomes: sensitivity SERO ranged from 18.4% to 96.1% and specificity 88.9% to 100%. However, the lack of a true reference standard for SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis makes it challenging to assess the true diagnostic accuracy of these tests. Eighteen studies reporting different sampling methods suggest that for virus tests, the type of sample obtained/type of tissue sampled could influence test accuracy. Finally we searched for, but did not identify, any evidence on how any test influences subsequent patient management. Conclusions: Evidence is rapidly emerging on the effectiveness of tests for COVID-19 diagnosis and management, but important uncertainties about their effectiveness and most appropriate application remain. Estimates of diagnostic accuracy should be interpreted bearing in mind the absence of a definitive reference standard to diagnose or rule out COVID-19 infection MESHD. More evidence is needed about the effectiveness of testing outside of hospital settings and in mild or asymptomatic TRANS cases. Implementation of public health strategies centred on COVID-19 testing provides opportunities to explore these important areas of research.

    Neutralizing antibody SERO response in non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 patients

    Authors: Natalia Ruetalo; Ramona Businger; Karina Althaus; Simon Fink; Felix Ruoff; Klaus Hamprecht; Bertram Flehmig; Tamam Bakchould; Markus F Templin; Michael Schindler

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.20169961 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    The majority of infections MESHD with SARS-CoV-2 (SCoV2) are asymptomatic TRANS or mild without the necessity of hospitalization. It is of outmost importance to reveal if these patients develop an antibody SERO response against SCoV2 and to define which antibodies SERO confer virus neutralization. We hence conducted a comprehensive serological survey of 49 patients with a mild course of disease MESHD and quantified neutralizing antibody SERO responses against authentic SCoV2 employing human cells as targets. Four patients (8%), even though symptomatic, did not develop antibodies SERO against SCoV2 and two other sera (4%) were only positive in one of the serological assays SERO employed. For the remainder, antibody SERO response against the S-protein correlated with serum SERO neutralization whereas antibodies SERO against the nucleocapsid were poor predictors of virus neutralization. Only six sera (12%) could be classified as highly neutralizing. Furthermore, sera from several individuals with fairly high antibody SERO levels had only poor neutralizing activity. In addition, our data suggest that antibodies SERO against the seasonal coronavirus 229E contribute to SCoV2 neutralization. Altogether, we show that there is a wide breadth of antibody SERO responses against SCoV2 in patients that differentially correlate with virus neutralization. This highlights the difficulty to define reliable surrogate markers for immunity against SCoV2.

    Kinetics of viral clearance and antibody SERO production across age groups TRANS in SARS-CoV-2 infected children TRANS

    Authors: Burak Bahar; Cyril Jacquot; Yunchuan Delores Mo; Roberta DeBiasi; Meghan Delaney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.06.20162446 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: To improve understanding of transition from viral infection MESHD to viral clearance, and antibody SERO response in pediatric patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Study design: This retrospective analysis of children TRANS tested for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR and IgG antibody SERO at a quaternary-care, free-standing pediatric hospital between March 13th, 2020 to June 21st, 2020 included 6369 patients who underwent PCR testing and 215 patients who underwent antibody testing SERO. During the initial study period, testing focused primarily on symptomatic children TRANS; the later study period included asymptomatic TRANS patients who underwent testing as preadmission or preprocedural screening. We report the proportion of positive and negative tests, time to viral clearance, and time to seropositivity. Results: The rate of positivity varied over time due to viral circulation in the community and transition from targeted testing of symptomatic patients to more universal screening of hospitalized patients. Median duration of viral shedding (RT-PCR positivity) was 19.5 days and RT-PCR negativity from positivity was 25 days. Of note, patients aged TRANS 6 to 15 years demonstrated a longer period of RT-PCR negativity from positivity, compared to patients aged TRANS 16 to 22 years (median=32 versus 18 days, p=0.015). Median time to seropositivity from RT-PCR positivity was 18 days while median time to reach adequate levels of neutralizing antibodies SERO (defined as equivalent to 160 titer) was 36 days. Conclusions: The majority of patients demonstrated a prolonged period of viral shedding after infection MESHD with SARS CoV-2. Whether this correlates with persistent infectivity is unknown. Only 17 of 33 patients demonstrated neutralizing antibodies SERO, suggesting that some patients may not mount significant immune responses to infection MESHD. It remains unknown if IgG antibody SERO production correlates with immunity and how long measurable antibodies SERO persist and protect against future infection MESHD.

    Dynamics of neutralizing antibody SERO titers in the months after SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD

    Authors: Katharine HD Crawford; Adam S Dingens; Rachel Eguia; Caitlin R Wolf; Naomi Wilcox; Jennifer K Logue; Kiel Shuey; Amanda M Casto; Brooke Fiala; Samuel Wrenn; Deleah Pettie; Neil P King; Helen Y Chu; Jesse D Bloom

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.06.20169367 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    Most individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop neutralizing antibodies SERO that target the viral spike protein. Here we quantify how levels of these antibodies SERO change in the months following SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD by examining longitudinal samples collected between {approx}30 and 152 days post- symptom onset TRANS from a prospective cohort of 34 recovered individuals with asymptomatic TRANS, mild, or moderate-severe disease MESHD. Neutralizing antibody SERO titers declined an average of about four-fold from one to four months post- symptom onset TRANS. Importantly, our data are consistent with the expected early immune response to viral infection MESHD, where an initial peak in antibody SERO levels is followed by a decline to a lower plateau. Additional studies of long-lived B-cells and antibody SERO titers over longer time frames are necessary to determine the durability of immunity to SARS-CoV-2.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-Specific IgG Antibodies SERO Among Adults TRANS Living in Connecticut Between March 1 and June 1, 2020: Post- Infection MESHD Prevalence SERO (PIP) Study

    Authors: Shiwani Mahajan; Rajesh Srinivasan; Carrie A Redlich; Sara K Huston; Kelly M Anastasio; Lisa Cashman; Dan Witters; Jenny Marlar; Shu-Xia Li; Zhenqiu Lin; Domonique Hodge; Manas Chattopadhyay; Mark D Adams; Charles Lee; Lokinendi V Rao; Chris Stewart; Karthik Kuppusamy; Albert I Ko; Harlan M Krumholz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168203 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: A seroprevalence SERO study can estimate the percentage of people with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in the general population. Most existing reports have used a convenience sample, which may bias their estimates. Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 based on a random sample of adults TRANS living in Connecticut between March 1 and June 1, 2020. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: We sought a representative sample of Connecticut residents who completed a survey between June 4 and June 23, 2020 and underwent serology testing for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO between June 10 and July 6, 2020. Participants: 505 respondents, aged TRANS [≥]18 years, residing in non-congregate settings who completed both the survey and the serology test. Main outcomes and measures: We estimated the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO among the overall population and across pre-specified subgroups. We also assessed the prevalence SERO of symptomatic illness, risk factors for virus exposure, and self-reported adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among this population. Results: Of the 505 respondents (mean age TRANS 50 [{+/-}17] years; 54% women; 76% non-Hispanic White individuals) included, 32% reported having at least 1 symptom suggestive of COVID-19 since March 1, 2020. Overall, 18 respondents had SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO, resulting in the state-level weighted seroprevalence SERO of 3.1 (90% CI 1.4-4.8). Individuals who were asymptomatic TRANS had significantly lower seroprevalence SERO (0.6% [90% CI 0.0-1.5]) compared with the overall state estimate, while those who reported having had [≥]1 and [≥]2 symptoms had a seroprevalence SERO of 8.0% (90% CI 3.1-12.9) and 13.0% (90% CI 3.5-22.5), respectively. All 9 of the respondents who reported previously having a positive coronavirus test were positive for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO. Nearly two-third of respondents reported having avoided public places (74%) and small gatherings of family or friends TRANS (75%), and 97% reported wearing a mask outside their home, at least part of the time. Conclusions and relevance: These estimates indicate that most people in Connecticut do not have detectable levels of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2. There is a need for continued adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among Connecticut residents, to prevent resurgence of COVID-19 in this region.

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    Assessment of a Laboratory-Based SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Test Among Hemodialysis Patients: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    Authors: Dena E Cohen; Gilbert Marlowe; Gabriel Contreras; Marie Ann Sosa; Jair Munoz Mendoza; Oliver Lenz; Zain Mithani; Pura Margarita Teixeiro; Nery Queija; Araceli Moneda; Jean S Jeanty; Katherine Swanzy; Misha Palecek; Mahesh Krishnan; Jeffery Giullian; Steven M Brunelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20163642 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction: The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID -19) pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS -CoV -2) infection MESHD. Although tests to detect anti - SARS -CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been developed, their sensitivity SERO and specificity in hemodialysis patients have not been previously assessed. Methods: As part of a quality improvement (QI) initiative, nasopharyngeal swabs and predialysis blood SERO samples were collected on the same day from adult TRANS patients receiving routine hemodialysis care at clinics managed by a large dialysis organization in the greater Miami, Florida region (23 - 30 Apr 2020). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for SARS -CoV -2 and chemiluminescence immunoassays SERO for anti -SARS -CoV2 antibodies SERO were performed according to manufacturer-specified protocols. Results: Of 715 participants in the QI initiative, 38 had symptomatology consistent with COVID -19 prior to or during the initiative. Among these, COVID -19 was PCR -confirmed in 14 and ruled out in 20, with the remaining 4 being inconclusive. Among the 34 patients with known COVID -19 status, the sensitivity SERO and specificity of the antibody test SERO were 57.1% and 85.0% when either antibody SERO was considered. The remaining 677 patients had no record of symptoms consistent with COVID -19, nor any known exposure. Of these, 38 patients (5.6%) tested positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Conclusions: The operational characteristics of the laboratory-based antibody test SERO make it sufficient to rule in, but not rule out, SARS -CoV -2 infection MESHD in the appropriate clinical circumstance. A substantial proportion of dialysis patients may have had asymptomatic TRANS SARS -CoV -2 infection MESHD.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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