Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (11)

Anosmia (9)

Cough (6)

Pneumonia (6)

Dyspnea (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 among high-risk populations in Lomé (Togo) in 2020

    Authors: Wemboo Afiwa Halatoko; Yao Rodion KONU; Fifonsi Adjidossi Gbeasor-Komlanvi; Arnold Junior Sadio; Martin Kouame Tchankoni; Koffi Segbeaya Komlanvi; Mounerou Salou; Ameyo Monique Dorkenoo; Issaka Maman; Ametepe Agbobli; Majeste Ihou Wateba; Komi Seraphin Adjoh; Edem Goeh Akue; Yem-bla Kao; Innocent Kpeto; Paul Pana; Rebecca Kinde-Sossou; Agbeko Tamakloe; Josee Nayo-Apetsianyi; Simon-Pierre Hamadi Assane; Mireille Prince-David; Sossinou Marcel Awoussi; Mohaman Djibril; Moustafa Mijiyawa; Anoumou Claver Dagnra; Didier Koumavi Ekouevi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.20163840 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: This survey aims at estimating the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in high risk populations in Lomé. Methods: From April 23rd to May 8th 2020, we recruited a sample of participants from five sectors: healthcare, air transport, police, road transport and informal. We collected oropharyngeal swab for direct detection through real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), and blood SERO for antibodies SERO detection by serological tests SERO. The overall prevalence SERO (current and past) of infection MESHD was defined by positivity for both tests. Results: A total of 955 participants with a median age TRANS of 36 (IQR 32-43) were included and 71.6% (n=684) were men. Around 22.1% (n=212) were from the air transport sector, 20.5% (n=196) in the police, and 38.7% (n=370) in the health sector. Seven participants (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.3-1.6%) had a positive rRT-PCR at the time of recruitment and nine (0.9%, 95% CI: 0.4-1.8%) were seropositive for IgM or IgG against SARS-CoV-2. We found an overall prevalence SERO of 1.6% (n=15), 95% CI: 0.9-2.6%. Conclusion: The prevalence SERO of the SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD among high-risk populations in Lomé was relatively low and could be explained by the various measures taken by the Togolese government. Therefore, we recommend targeted screening.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-Specific IgG Antibodies SERO Among Adults TRANS Living in Connecticut Between March 1 and June 1, 2020: Post- Infection MESHD Prevalence SERO (PIP) Study

    Authors: Shiwani Mahajan; Rajesh Srinivasan; Carrie A Redlich; Sara K Huston; Kelly M Anastasio; Lisa Cashman; Dan Witters; Jenny Marlar; Shu-Xia Li; Zhenqiu Lin; Domonique Hodge; Manas Chattopadhyay; Mark D Adams; Charles Lee; Lokinendi V Rao; Chris Stewart; Karthik Kuppusamy; Albert I Ko; Harlan M Krumholz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168203 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: A seroprevalence SERO study can estimate the percentage of people with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in the general population. Most existing reports have used a convenience sample, which may bias their estimates. Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 based on a random sample of adults TRANS living in Connecticut between March 1 and June 1, 2020. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: We sought a representative sample of Connecticut residents who completed a survey between June 4 and June 23, 2020 and underwent serology testing for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO between June 10 and July 6, 2020. Participants: 505 respondents, aged TRANS [≥]18 years, residing in non-congregate settings who completed both the survey and the serology test. Main outcomes and measures: We estimated the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO among the overall population and across pre-specified subgroups. We also assessed the prevalence SERO of symptomatic illness, risk factors for virus exposure, and self-reported adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among this population. Results: Of the 505 respondents (mean age TRANS 50 [{+/-}17] years; 54% women; 76% non-Hispanic White individuals) included, 32% reported having at least 1 symptom suggestive of COVID-19 since March 1, 2020. Overall, 18 respondents had SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO, resulting in the state-level weighted seroprevalence SERO of 3.1 (90% CI 1.4-4.8). Individuals who were asymptomatic TRANS had significantly lower seroprevalence SERO (0.6% [90% CI 0.0-1.5]) compared with the overall state estimate, while those who reported having had [≥]1 and [≥]2 symptoms had a seroprevalence SERO of 8.0% (90% CI 3.1-12.9) and 13.0% (90% CI 3.5-22.5), respectively. All 9 of the respondents who reported previously having a positive coronavirus test were positive for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO. Nearly two-third of respondents reported having avoided public places (74%) and small gatherings of family or friends TRANS (75%), and 97% reported wearing a mask outside their home, at least part of the time. Conclusions and relevance: These estimates indicate that most people in Connecticut do not have detectable levels of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2. There is a need for continued adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among Connecticut residents, to prevent resurgence of COVID-19 in this region.

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    Clinical characteristics and antibody SERO response to SARS-CoV-2 spike 1 protein using the VITROS Anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests in COVID-19 patients in Japan

    Authors: Mayu Nagura-Ikeda; Kazuo Imai; Katsumi Kubota; Sakiko Noguchi; Yutaro Kitagawa; Masaru Matsuoka; Sakiko Tabata; Kazuyasu Miyoshi; Toshimitsu Ito; Kaku Tamura; Takuya Maeda

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.02.20166256 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: We evaluated clinical characteristics and the clinical utility of VITROS SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests according to COVID-19 severity in patients in Japan. Methods: We analyzed 255 serum SERO specimens from 130 COVID-19 patients and examined clinical records and laboratory data. Presence of total (IgA, IgM, and IgG) and specific IgG antibody SERO for the spike 1 antigen of SARS-CoV2 was determined using VITROS Anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests. Findings: Overall, 98 (75.4%) and 32 (24.6%) patients had mild and severe COVID-19, respectively. On admission, 76 (58.5%) and 45 (34.6%) patients were positive for total and IgG antibody SERO assays. Among 91 patients at discharge, 90 (98.9%) and 81 (89.0%) patients were positive for total and IgG antibody SERO, respectively. Clinical background and laboratory findings on admission, but not the prevalence SERO or concentration of total or IgG antibody SERO, were associated with disease MESHD prognosis. Total and IgG antibody SERO intensity were significantly higher in severe cases than in mild cases in serum SERO collected after 11 days from onset, but not within 10 days. Conclusion: VITROS Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total and IgG assays will be useful as supporting diagnostic and surveillance tools and for evaluation of humoral immune response to COVID-19. Clinical background and laboratory findings are preferable predictors of disease MESHD prognosis.

    SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence SERO Across a Diverse Cohort of Healthcare Workers

    Authors: Joseph Ebinger; Gregory J. Botwin; Christine M. Albert; Mona Alotaibi; Moshe Arditi; Anders H. Berg; Aleksandra Binek; Patrick G. Botting; Justyna Fert-Bober; Jane C. Figueiredo; Jonathan D. Grein; Wohaib Hasan; Mir Henglin; Shehnaz K. Hussain; Mohit Jain; Sandy Joung; Michael Karin; Elizabeth H Kim; Dalin Li; Yunxian Liu; Eric Luong; Dermot P.B. McGovern; Akil Merchant; Noah M. Merin; Peggy B. Miles; Margo Minissian; Trevor-Trung Nguyen; Koen Raedschelders; Mohamad A. Rashid; Celine E. Riera; Richard V. Riggs; Sonia Sharma; Sarah Sternbach; Nancy Sun; Warren G. Tourtellotte; Jennifer E. Van Eyk; Kimia Sobhani; Jonathan G. Braun; Susan Cheng

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20163055 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Antibody testing SERO is important for understanding patterns of exposure and potential immunity to SARS-CoV-2. Prior data on seroprevalence SERO have been subject to variations in selection of individuals and nature as well as timing of testing in relation to exposures. Objective: We sought to determine the extent of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalance and the factors associated with seroprevelance across a diverse cohort of healthcare workers. Design: Observational cohort study of healthcare workers, including SARS-CoV-2 serology testing and participant questionaires. Participants: A diverse and unselected population of adults TRANS (n=6,062) employed in a multi-site healthcare delivery system located in Los Angeles County, including individuals with direct patient contact and others with non-patient-oriented work functions. Exposure: Exposure and infection MESHD with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as determined by seropositivity. Main Outcomes: Using Bayesian and multi-variate analyses, we estimated seroprevalence SERO and factors associated with seropositivity and antibody SERO titers, including pre-existing demographic and clinical characteristics; potential Covid-19 illness related exposures; and, symptoms consistent with Covid-19 infection MESHD. Results: We observed a seroprevalence SERO rate of 4.1%, with anosmia HP as the most prominently associated self-reported symptom in addition to fever MESHD fever HP, dry cough MESHD cough HP, anorexia MESHD anorexia HP, and myalgias MESHD myalgias HP. After adjusting for potential confounders, pre-existing medical conditions were not associated with antibody SERO positivity. However, seroprevalence SERO was associated with younger age TRANS, Hispanic ethnicity, and African-American race, as well as presence of either a personal or household member having a prior diagnosis of Covid-19. Importantly, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with antibody SERO positivity even after adjusting for personal Covid-19 diagnosis status, suggesting the contribution of unmeasured structural or societally factors. Notably, number of people, or children TRANS, in the home was not associated with antibody SERO positivity. Conclusion and Relevance: The demographic factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO among our healthcare workers underscore the importance of exposure sources beyond the workplace. The size and diversity of our study population, combined with robust survey and modeling techniques, provide a vibrant picture of the demographic factors, exposures, and symptoms that can identify individuals with susceptibility as well as potential to mount an immune response to Covid-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 antigens expressed in plants detect antibody SERO responses in COVID-19 patients

    Authors: Mohau S Makatsa; Marius B Tincho; Jerome M Wendoh; Sherazaan D Ismail; Rofhiwa Nesamari; Francisco Pera; Scott de Beer; Anura David; Sarika Jugwanth; Maemu P Gededzha; Nakampe Mampeule; Ian Sanne; Wendy Stevens; Lesley Scott; Jonathan Blackburn; Elizabeth S Mayne; Roanne S Keeton; Wendy A Burgers

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20167940 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has swept the world and poses a significant global threat to lives and livelihoods, with over 16 million confirmed cases TRANS and at least 650 000 deaths MESHD from COVID-19 in the first 7 months of the pandemic. Developing tools to measure seroprevalence SERO and understand protective immunity to SARS-CoV-2 is a priority. We aimed to develop a serological assay SERO using plant-derived recombinant viral proteins, which represent important tools in less-resourced settings. Methods: We established an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO) using the S1 and receptor-binding domain (RBD) portions of the spike protein from SARS-CoV-2, expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. We measured antibody SERO responses in sera from South African patients (n=77) who had tested positive by PCR for SARS-CoV-2. Samples were taken a median of six weeks after the diagnosis, and the majority of participants had mild and moderate COVID-19 disease MESHD. In addition, we tested the reactivity of pre-pandemic plasma SERO (n=58) and compared the performance SERO of our in-house ELISA SERO with a commercial assay. We also determined whether our assay could detect SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG and IgA in saliva. Results: We demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2-specific immunoglobulins are readily detectable using recombinant plant-derived viral proteins, in patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR. Reactivity to S1 and RBD was detected in 51 (66%) and 48 (62%) of participants, respectively. Notably, we detected 100% of samples identified as having S1-specific antibodies SERO by a validated, high sensitivity SERO commercial ELISA SERO, and OD values were strongly and significantly correlated between the two assays. For the pre-pandemic plasma SERO, 1/58 (1.7%) of samples were positive, indicating a high specificity for SARS-CoV-2 in our ELISA SERO. SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG correlated significantly with IgA and IgM responses. Endpoint titers of S1- and RBD-specific immunoglobulins ranged from 1:50 to 1:3200. S1-specific IgG and IgA were found in saliva samples from convalescent volunteers. Conclusions: We demonstrate that recombinant SARS-CoV-2 proteins produced in plants enable robust detection of SARS-CoV-2 humoral responses. This assay can be used for seroepidemiological studies and to measure the strength and durability of antibody SERO responses to SARS-CoV-2 in infected patients in our setting.

    SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence SERO in Relation to Timing of Symptoms

    Authors: Joseph Ebinger; Gregory J. Botwin; Christine M. Albert; Mona Alotaibi; Moshe Arditi; Anders H. Berg; Aleksandra Binek; Patrick Botting; Justyna Fert-Bober; Jane C. Figueiredo; Jonathan D. Grein; Wohaib Hasan; Mir Henglin; Shehnaz K. Hussain; Mohit Jain; Sandy Joung; Michael Karin; Elizabeth H. Kim; Dalin Li; Yunxian Liu; Eric Luong; Dermot P.B. McGovern; Akil Merchant; Noah Merin; Peggy B. Miles; Trevor-Trung Nguyen; Koen Raedschelders; Mohamad A. Rashid; Celine E. Riera; Richard V. Riggs; Sonia Sharma; Kimia Sobhani; Sarah Sternbach; Nancy Sun; Warren G. Tourtellotte; Jennifer E. Van Eyk; Jonathan G. Braun; Susan Cheng

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.02.20166876 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Of individuals with SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO testing performed, those who contemporaneously experienced a cluster of Covid-19 relevant symptoms in the 1-2 months preceding the antibody SERO assay were more likely to test positive whereas those who experienced the symptom clustering in the prior 3-6 months were more likely to test negative. These findings suggest that antibodies SERO likely wane over a period of months, particularly in relation to the timing of symptoms.

    Detection of asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD among healthcare workers: results from a large-scale screening program based on rapid serological testing SERO.

    Authors: Francesca Maria Carozzi; Maria Grazia Cusi; Mauro Pistello; Luisa Galli; Alessandro Bartoloni; Gabriele Anichini; Chiara Azzari; Michele Emdin; Claudia Gandolfo; Fabrizio Maggi; Elisabetta Mantengoli; Maria Moriondo; Giovanna Moscato; Irene Paganini; Claudio Passino; Francesco Profili; Fabio Voller; Marco Zappa; Filippo Quattrone; Gian Maria Rossolini; Paolo Francesconi; - SARS-CoV-2 Serosurvey Tuscan Working Group

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20149567 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the performance SERO of two available rapid immunological tests for identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD Coronavirus 2 ( SARS-CoV-2) antibodies SERO and their subsequent application to a regional screening of health care workers (HCW) in Tuscany (Italy). Design: measures of accuracy and HCW serological surveillance Setting: 6 major health facilities in Tuscany, Italy. Participants: 17,098 HCW of the Tuscany Region. Measures of accuracy were estimated to assess sensitivity SERO in 176 hospitalized Covid-19 clinical subjects at least 14 days after a diagnostic PCR-positive assay result. Specificity was assessed in 295 sera biobanked in the pre-Covid-19 era in winter or summer 2013-14 Main outcome measures: Sensitivity SERO and specificity, and 95% confidence intervals, were measured using two serological tests SERO, named T-1 and T-2. Positive and Negative predictive values SERO were estimated at different levels of prevalence SERO. HCW of the health centers were tested using the serological SERO tests, with a follow- up nasopharyngeal PCR-test swab in positive tested cases. Results: Sensitivity SERO was estimated as 99% (95%CI: 95%-100%) and 97% (95% CI: 90%-100%), whereas specificity was the 95% and 92%, for Test T-1 and T-2 respectively. In the historical samples IgM cross-reactions were detected in sera collected during the winter period, probably linked to other human coronaviruses. Out of the 17,098 tested, 3.1% have shown the presence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, among them 6.8% were positive at PCR follow-up test on nasopharyngeal swabs. Conclusion Based on the low prevalence SERO estimate observed in this survey, the use of serological test SERO as a stand-alone test is not justified to assess the individual immunity status. Serological tests SERO showed good performance SERO and might be useful in an integrated surveillance, for identification of infected subjects and their contacts as required by the policy of contact tracing TRANS, with the aim to reduce the risk of dissemination, especially in health service facilities.

    High SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Health Care Workers but relatively low numbers of deaths MESHD in urban Malawi

    Authors: Marah Grace Chibwana; Khuzwayo Chidiwa Jere; Jonathan Mandolo; Vincent Katunga-Phiri; Dumizulu Tembo; Ndaona Mitole; Samantha Musasa; Simon Sichone; Agness Lakudzala; Lusako Sibale; Prisca Matambo; Innocent Kadwala; Rachel Louise Byrne; Alice Mbewe; Marc Y.R. Henrion; Ben Morton; Chimota Phiri; Jane Mallewa; Henry C Mwandumba; Emily R Adams; Stephen B Gordon; Kondwani Charles Jambo

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164970 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background In low-income countries, like Malawi, important public health measures including social distancing or a lockdown, have been challenging to implement owing to socioeconomic constraints, leading to predictions that the COVID-19 pandemic would progress rapidly. However, due to limited capacity to test for severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD, there are no reliable estimates of the true burden of infection MESHD and death MESHD. We, therefore, conducted a SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey amongst health care workers (HCW) in Blantyre city to estimate the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in urban Malawi. Methods Five hundred otherwise asymptomatic TRANS HCWs were recruited from Blantyre City (Malawi) from 22nd May 2020 to 19th June 2020 and serum samples SERO were collected all participants. A commercial ELISA SERO was used to measure SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in serum SERO. We run local negative samples (2018 - 2019) to verify the specificity of the assay. To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV-2 antibodies SERO, we adjusted the proportion of positive results based on local specificity of the assay. Results Eighty-four participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The HCW with a positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO result came from different parts of the city. The adjusted seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO was 12.3% [CI 9.0-15.7]. Using age TRANS-stratified infection MESHD fatality estimates reported from elsewhere, we found that at the observed adjusted seroprevalence SERO, the number of predicted deaths MESHD was 8 times the number of reported deaths MESHD. Conclusion The high seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO among HCW and the discrepancy in the predicted versus reported deaths MESHD, suggests that there was early exposure but slow progression of COVID-19 epidemic in urban Malawi. This highlights the urgent need for development of locally parameterised mathematical models to more accurately predict the trajectory of the epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa for better evidence-based policy decisions and public health response planning.

    Persistence of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in non-hospitalized COVID-19 convalescent health care workers

    Authors: Margherita Bruni; Valentina Cecatiello; Angelica Diaz-Basabe; Georgia Lattanzi; Erika Mileti; Silvia Monzani; Laura Pirovano; Francesca Rizzelli; Clara Visintin; Giuseppina Bonizzi; Marco Giani; Marialuisa Lavitrano; Silvia Faravelli; Federico Forneris; Flavio Caprioli; Pier Giuseppe Pelicci; Gioacchino Natoli; Sebastiano Pasqualato; Marina Mapelli; Federica Facciotti

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164368 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background. Coronavirus disease MESHD-19 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome MESHD CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel beta-coronavirus. Although antibody SERO response to SARS-CoV-2 can be detected early during the infection MESHD, several outstanding questions remain to be addressed regarding magnitude and persistence of antibody SERO titer against different viral proteins and their correlation with the strength of the immune response, as measured by serum SERO levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Methods. An ELISA assay SERO has been developed by expressing and purifying the recombinant SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor Binding Domain (RBD), Soluble Ectodomain (Spike), and full length nucleocapsid protein (N protein). Sera from healthcare workers affected by non-severe COVID-19 were longitudinally collected over four weeks, and compared to sera from patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Units (ICU) and SARS-CoV-2-negative subjects for the presence of IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies SERO as well as soluble pro-inflammatory mediators in the sera. Results. Specificity and sensitivity SERO of the ELISA assays SERO were high for anti-RBD IgG and IgA (92-97%) and slightly lower for IgM and the Spike and N proteins (70-85%). The ELISA SERO allowed quantification of IgM, IgG and IgA antibody SERO responses against all the viral antigens tested and showed a correlation between magnitude of the antibody SERO response and disease MESHD severity. Non-hospitalized subjects showed lower antibody SERO titers and blood SERO pro-inflammatory cytokine profiles as compared to patients in Intensive Care Units (ICU), irrespective of the antibodies tested SERO. Noteworthy, in non-severe COVID-19 infections MESHD, antibody SERO titers against RBD and Spike, but not against the N protein, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased within a month after viral clearance. Conclusions. Rapid decline in antibody SERO titers and in pro-inflammatory cytokines may be a common feature of non-severe SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, suggesting that antibody SERO-mediated protection against re- infection MESHD with SARS-CoV-2 is of short duration. These results suggest caution in use serological testing SERO to estimate the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in the general population.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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