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MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    CLINICAL COURSE, RISK FACTORS FOR TRANSFER TO ICU AND MORTALITY IN MESHD PATIENTS WITH COVID-19 AFFECTED BY ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE HP REFERRED TO A RESPIRATORY INTERMEDIATATE CARE UNIT.

    Authors: Enrico Buonamico; Vitaliano Nicola Quaranta; Esterina Boniello; Michela Dimitri; Marco Majorano; Luciana Labate; Paola Pierucci; Federica Barratta; Giovanna Elisiana Carpagnano; Onofrio Resta; Anil Hormis; Neil Todd; Antoanela Colda; Ian Reckless; Tim Brooks; Andre Charlett; Matthew Hickman; Isabel Oliver; David Wyllie

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.19.20178350 Date: 2020-08-22 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction There are no clear guidelines as yet for the selection of patients affected by COVID-19 who can be treated in intermediate RICU, neither shared criteria for their intubation and transfer in ICU. In the present study we described the clinical course and risk factors for transfer to ICU and mortality of SARS-Cov-2 positive patients affected by acute respiratory failure HP respiratory failure MESHD, hospitalized in a Respiratory Intermediate Care Unit in the south of Italy. Methods In this retrospective, observational single centre study we evaluated 96 laboratory confirmed COVID-19 patients affected by acute respiratory failure MESHD respiratory failure HP ( ARF MESHD). We compared demographic data, laboratory data and clinical outcomes between deceased and survived patients, aiming to identify risk factors for transfer to ICU and mortality, and possible gender TRANS-related differences. Results Of 96 patients, 51 (53.1%) survived and 45 (46.9 %) died. Among those who died, 23 (51.1%) deceased in RICU. Twenty-nine (30.2%) were transferred to ICU, of whom 22 (75.9%) died in ICU. Patients affected by COPD MESHD have a higher mortality compared to patients without this comorbidity (p=0.002). Lower baseline P/F ratio (p=0,014) and neurologic comorbidities (p=0,008) emerged as risk factors for death MESHD. Male TRANS were younger than female TRANS patients (66 vs 80 y.o.; p=0.042). In female TRANS patients, lower peripheral blood SERO lymphocyte count (p=0.007) is a risk factor for death MESHD, characteristic gender TRANS-related in our sample. Female TRANS sex was a protective parameter against transfer to ICU (p=0,036) and P/F ratio was not a significant predictor of transfer to ICU (p=0,227). Only higher baseline CRP (p=0,034) has shown a predictive role for transfer to ICU in our sample. Patients deceased after a transfer to ICU had younger age TRANS (p=0,000), lower median comorbidity number (p=0,000), lower D-dimer (p=0,029) and lower prevalence SERO of female TRANS sex (p=0,029). Discussion Mortality in our study was similar to that found in other studies involving patients in non-invasive ventilation. In our study older age TRANS and comorbidities play as predictors of death in COVID-19 patients. COPD MESHD, despite presenting low prevalence SERO, is a risk factor for death MESHD, both in men and women. In female TRANS patients chronic ischemic heart disease MESHD and congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD are death MESHD predictors. High CRP and lymphopenia HP lymphopenia MESHD, linked to inflammatory status, are predictors of transfer to ICU. Patients transferred to ICU higher mortality than the others, and patients who die in ICU are mostly men, younger and have less comorbidities. Baseline P/F ratio is not a good predictor of transfer to ICU, while in our sample is a sensible predictor of death MESHD. More studies need to be performed on COVID-19 patients, in the urgency of COVID-19 pandemic persistence.

    Factors Associated with Disease Severity and Mortality among Patients with Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Authors: Vignesh Chidambaram; Nyan Lynn Tun; Waqas Haque; Marie Gilbert Majella; Ranjith Kumar Sivakumar; Amudha Kumar; Angela Ting-Wei Hsu; Izza Ishak; Aqsha Nur; Samuel Ayeh; Emmanuella Salia; Ahsan Zil-E-Ali; Muhammad Saeed; Ayu Sarena; Bhavna Seth; Muzzammil Ahmadzada; Eman Haque; Pranita Neupane; Kuang-Heng Wang; Tzu-Miao Pu; Syed Ali; Muhammad Arshad; Lin Wang; Sheriza Baksh; Petros Karakousis; Panagis Galiatsatos

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.20166868 Date: 2020-08-13 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Understanding the factors associated with disease severity and mortality in Coronavirus disease MESHD (COVID19) is imperative to effectively triage patients. We performed a systematic review to determine the demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiological factors associated with severity and mortality in COVID-19. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and WHO database for English language articles from inception until May 8, 2020. We included Observational studies with direct comparison of clinical characteristics between a) patients who died and those who survived or b) patients with severe disease and those without severe disease. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed by two authors independently. Results: Among 15680 articles from the literature search, 109 articles were included in the analysis. The risk of mortality was higher in patients with increasing age TRANS, male TRANS gender TRANS (RR 1.45; 95%CI 1.23,1.71), dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD (RR 2.55; 95%CI 1.88,2.46), diabetes MESHD (RR 1.59; 95%CI 1.41,1.78), hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (RR 1.90; 95%CI 1.69,2.15). Congestive heart failure HP Congestive heart failure MESHD (OR 4.76; 95%CI 1.34,16.97), hilar lymphadenopathy HP lymphadenopathy MESHD (OR 8.34; 95%CI 2.57,27.08), bilateral lung involvement (OR 4.86; 95%CI 3.19,7.39) and reticular pattern (OR 5.54; 95%CI 1.24,24.67) were associated with severe disease. Clinically relevant cut-offs for leukocytosis HP leukocytosis MESHD(>10.0 x109/L), lymphopenia HP lymphopenia MESHD(< 1.1 x109/L), elevated C-reactive protein(>100mg/L), LDH(>250U/L) and D-dimer(>1mg/L) had higher odds of severe disease and greater risk of mortality. Conclusion: Knowledge of the factors associated of disease severity and mortality identified in our study may assist in clinical decision-making and critical-care resource allocation for patients with COVID-19.

    Association of Smoking Status with Outcomes in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

    Authors: Muhammad Adrish; Sridhar Chilimuri; Nikhitha Mantri; Haozhe Sun; Maleeha Zahid; Sudharsan Gongati; Ked Fortuzi; Abhishrut Pramod Jog; Pravish Purmessur; Ravish Singhal

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39752/v1 Date: 2020-07-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Introduction: Smoking causes inflammation of the lung MESHD epithelium by releasing cytokines and impairing muco-ciliary clearance. Some studies have linked smoking with severity of illness of COVID-19 whereas others have found no such association.Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of all adults TRANS hospitalized with COVID-19 from March 09 to May 18, 2020. Results: 1173 patients met the study criteria. 837 patients never smoked and 336 patients were either current smokers or past smoker and were grouped together in smokers group. Patients in smokers group were more likely to be male TRANS and had higher incidence of underlying COPD MESHD (19% vs. 6%, p<0.001), human immunodeficiency HP immunodeficiency MESHD virus infection (11% vs. 5%,p<0.001), cancer MESHD (11% vs. 6%, p=0.005), congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD (15% vs. 8%, p<0.001), coronary artery disease MESHD (15% vs. 9%, p=0.027), chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD (11% vs. 8%, p=0.037), and end-stage renal disease MESHD (10% vs. 6%, p=0.009) compared to non-smokers. Smokers were more likely to develop critical illness requiring mechanical ventilation (47% vs. 37% p=0.005). Univariate Cox model for survival analysis by smoking status showed that smokers only current smokers had higher risk of death MESHD compared to never-smokers (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.22–2.12, p<0.001). In the multivariate approach Cox model for the survival, female TRANS sex, age TRANS, LDH and systemic steroid use were associated with overall survival.Conclusion: In our large single center retrospective database of patients hospitalized with COVID-19, smoking was associated with development of critical illness MESHD and higher likelihood of death MESHD

    The association of cardiovascular disease MESHD and other pre-existing comorbidities with COVID-19 mortality: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Paddy Ssentongo; Anna E. Ssentongo; Emily S. Heilbrunn; Djibril M Ba; Vernon M. Chinchilli

    doi:10.1101/2020.05.10.20097253 Date: 2020-05-14 Source: medRxiv

    Background Exploring the association of coronavirus-2019 disease (COVID-19) mortality with chronic pre-existing conditions may promote the importance of targeting these populations during this pandemic to optimize survival. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to explore the association of pre-existing conditions with COVID-19 mortality. Methods We searched MEDLINE, OVID databases, SCOPUS, and medrxiv.org for the period December 1, 2019, to May 1, 2020. The outcome of interest was the risk of COVID-19 mortality in patients with and without pre-existing conditions. Comorbidities explored were cardiovascular diseases MESHD ( coronary artery disease MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, cardiac arrhythmias MESHD arrhythmias HP, and congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease HP chronic obstructive pulmonary disease MESHD, type 2 diabetes MESHD, cancer MESHD, chronic kidney disease HP chronic kidney disease MESHD, chronic liver disease MESHD, and stroke HP stroke MESHD. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. All analyses were performed using random-effects models and heterogeneity was quantified. Results Ten chronic conditions from 19 studies were included in the meta-analysis (n = 61,455 patients with COVID-19; mean age TRANS, 61 years; 57% male TRANS). Overall the between-study study heterogeneity was medium and studies had low publication bias MESHD and high quality. Coronary heart disease MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD, and cancer MESHD significantly increased the risk of mortality from COVID-19. The risk of mortality from COVID-19 in patients with coronary heart disease MESHD was 2.4 times as high as those without coronary heart disease MESHD (RR= 2.40, 95%CI=1.71-3.37, n=5) and twice as high in patients with hypertension HP hypertension MESHD as high as that compared to those without hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (RR=1.89, 95%CI= 1.58-2.27, n=9). Patients with cancer MESHD also were at twice the risk of mortality from COVID-19 compared to those without cancer MESHD (RR=1.93 95%CI 1.15-3.24, n=4), and those with congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD were at 2.5 times the risk of mortality compared to those without congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD (RR=2.66, 95%CI 1.58-4.48, n=3). Conclusions COVID-19 patients with all any cardiovascular disease MESHD, coronary heart disease MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, congestive heart failure HP congestive heart failure MESHD, and cancer MESHD have an increased risk of mortality. Tailored infection MESHD prevention and treatment strategies targeting this high-risk population are warranted to optimize survival.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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