Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (17)

Pneumonia (7)

Anosmia (7)

Cough (6)

Falls (5)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 31 - 40 records in total 381
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    Development and validation of a multiplex bead based assay for the detection of antibodies SERO directed against SARS-CoV-2 proteins

    Authors: Robert A Bray; Jar-How Lee; Peter Brescia; Deepali Kumar; Thoa Nong; Remi Shih; E Steve Woodle; Jonathan S Maltzman; Howard M Gebel; Paula Hartman; Jenny Park; Maher Alayyoubi; Hari Bhaskaran; Adrian Dukanovic; Belle Bao; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.02.20185199 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Transplant recipients who develop COVID-19 may be at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Determining antibody SERO status against SARS-CoV-2 in candidates and recipients will be important to understand the epidemiology and clinical course of COVID-19 infection MESHD in this population. There are multiple antibody tests SERO to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO, but their performance SERO varies according to their platforms and the antigenic targets, making interpretation of the results challenging. Additionally, currently available serological tests SERO do not exclude the possibility that positive responses are due to cross reactive antibodies SERO to community coronaviruses. This study describes the development and validation of a high throughput multiplex bead based antibody SERO detection assay with the capacity to identify, simultaneously, patient responses to five distinct SARS-CoV-2 proteins. The antibody SERO response to these proteins are SARS-CoV-2 specific as antibodies SERO against four community coronaviruses do not cross-react. Assay configuration is essentially identical to the single antigen bead assays used in the majority of histocompatibility laboratories around the world and could easily be implemented into routine screening of transplant candidates and recipients. This new assay provides a novel tool to interrogate the spectrum of immune responses to SAR TRANS-CoV-2 and is uniquely suitable for use in the transplant setting.

    Rare SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO development in cancer MESHD patients

    Authors: louisa hempel; Jakob Molnar; Sebastian Robert; julia veloso; Zeljka Trepotec; Sofie Englisch; Philip Weinzierl; Valeria Milani; Katrin Schweneker; Bastian Fleischmann; Josef Scheiber; Beate Gandorfer; Axel Kleespies; Wolfgang Kaminski; Dirk Hempel; Kristina Riedman; Armin Piehler

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-71560/v1 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: ResearchSquare

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO development and immunity will be crucial for the further course of the pandemic. Until now, it has been assumed that patients who were infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop antibodies SERO as it is the case with other coronaviruses, like MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV MESHD. In the present study, we analyzed the antibody SERO development of 77 oncology patients 26 days after positive RT-qPCR testing for SARS-CoV-2. RT-qPCR and anti-SARS-CoV2- antibody SERO methods from BGI (MGIEasy Magnetic Beads Virus DNA/RNA Extraction Kit) and Roche (Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoassay SERO) were used, respectively, according to the manufacturers’ specifications.Surprisingly, in only 6 of 77 individuals with a confirmed history of COVID-19 antibody SERO development was detected. Despite of multiple testing, the remaining patients did not show measurable antibody SERO concentrations in subsequent tests. These results undermine the previous hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD are regularly associated with antibody SERO development and cast doubt on the provided immunity to COVID-19. Understanding the adaptive and humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 will play a key-roll in vaccine development and gaining further knowledge on the pathogenesis.

    Multiplexed Detection and Quantification of Human Antibody SERO Response to COVID-19 Infection Using a Plasmon Enhanced Biosensor Platform

    Authors: Nathaniel C Cady; Natalya Tokranova; Armond Minor; Nima Nikvand; Klemen Strle; William T Lee; William Page; Ernest Guignon; Arturo Pilar; George N Gibson; - the Yale IMPACT Research Team; Charles S. Dela Cruz; Shelli F. Farhadian; Akiko Iwasaki; Albert I. Ko; Nathan D. Grubaugh; Anne L. Wyllie

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.02.20187070 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    The 2019 SARS CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has highlighted the need for rapid and accurate tests to diagnose acute infection MESHD and immune response to infection. A multiplexed assay built on grating-coupled fluorescent plasmonics (GC-FP) was shown to have 100% selectivity and sensitivity SERO (n = 23) when measuring serum SERO IgG levels against three COVID-19 antigens (spike S1, spike S1S2, and the nucleocapsid protein). The entire assay takes less than 30 min, making it highly competitive with well-established ELISA SERO and immunofluorescence assays. GC-FP is quantitative over a large dynamic range, providing a linear response for serum SERO titers ranging from 1:25 to 1:1,600, and shows high correlation with both ELISA SERO and a Luminex-based microsphere immunoassay SERO (MIA) (Pearson r > 0.9). Compatibility testing with dried blood SERO spot samples (n = 63) demonstrated 100% selectivity and 86.7% sensitivity SERO. A machine learning (ML) model was trained to classify dried blood SERO spot samples for prior COVID-19 infection status, based on the combined antibody SERO response to S1, S1S2, and Nuc antigens. The ML model yielded 100% selectivity and 80% sensitivity SERO and demonstrated a higher stringency than diagnosis with a single antibody SERO-antigen response. The platform is flexible and will readily accommodate IgG, IgM, and IgA. Further, the assay uses sub-nanogram quantities of capture ligand and is thus readily modified to include additional antigens, which is shown by the addition of RBD in later iterations of the test. The combination of rapid, multiplexed, and quantitative detection for both blood SERO serum SERO and dried blood SERO spot samples makes GC-FP an attractive approach for COVID-19 antibody testing SERO.

    Rapid 'mix and read' assay for scalable detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in patient plasma SERO

    Authors: Hong Yue; Radosław P Nowak; Daan Overwijn; N Connor Payne; Stephanie Fischinger; Caroline Atyeo; Lindsey R Baden; Eric James Nilles; Elizabeth W Karlson; Xu G Yu; Jonathan Z Li; Galit Alter; Ralph Mazitschek; Eric S Fischer; Caroline Marshall; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20184101 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    The human beta coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, causative virus of COVID-19, has infected more than 15 million people globally and continues to spread. Widespread, population level testing to detect active and past infections is critical to curb the COVID-19 pandemic. Antibody SERO ( serological) testing SERO is the only option for detecting past infections outside the narrow window accessible to nucleic acid-based tests. However, currently available serological assays SERO commonly lack scalability. Here, we describe the development of a rapid homogenous serological assay SERO for the detection of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in patient plasma SERO. We show that the fluorescence-based assay accurately detects seroconversion in COVID-19 patients from less than 1 microliter of plasma SERO. Using a cohort of samples from COVID-19 infected MESHD or healthy individuals, we demonstrate detection with 100% sensitivity SERO and specificity. This assay addresses an important need for a robust, low barrier to implementation, and scalable serological assay SERO with complementary strengths to currently available serological platforms.

    Development of SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid Specific Monoclonal Antibodies SERO

    Authors: James S Terry; Loran BR Anderson; Michael S Scherman; Carley E McAlister; Rushika Perera; Tony Schountz; Brian J Geiss

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.03.280370 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: bioRxiv

    The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive disruptions in every society around the world. To help fight COVID-19, new molecular tools specifically targeting critical components of the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), are desperately needed. The SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein is a major component of the viral replication processes, integral to viral particle assembly, and is a major diagnostic marker for infection MESHD and immune protection. Currently available antibody SERO reagents targeting the nucleocapsid protein were primarily developed against the related SARS-CoV virus MESHD and are not specific to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein. Therefore, in this work we developed and characterized a series of new mouse monoclonal antibodies SERO against the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein. The anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies were tested SERO in ELISA SERO, western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses. The variable regions from the heavy and light chains from five select clones were cloned and sequenced, and preliminary epitope mapping of the sequenced clones was performed. Overall, the new antibody SERO reagents described here will be of significant value in the fight against COVID-19.

    Insights into the practical effectiveness of RT-PCR testing for SARS-CoV-2 from serologic data, a cohort study

    Authors: Zhen Zhang; Qifang Bi; Shisong Fang; Lan Wei; Xin Wang; Jianfan He; Yongsheng Wu; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20182469 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Virologic detection of SARS-CoV-2 through Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) has limitations for surveillance. Serologic tests SERO can be an important complementary approach. Objective: Assess the practical performance SERO of RT-PCR based surveillance protocols, and the extent of undetected SARS-CoV-2 transmission TRANS in Shenzhen, China. Design: Cohort study nested in a public health response. Setting: Shenzhen, China; January-May 2020. Participants: 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS of confirmed COVID-19 cases and 400 residents without known exposure (main analysis). Fifty-seven PCR-positive case contacts (timing analysis). Measurements: Virological testing by RT-PCR. Measurement of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in PCR-negative contacts 2-15 weeks after initial testing using total Ab ELISA SERO. Rates of undetected infection MESHD, performance SERO of RT-PCR over the course of infection MESHD, and characteristics of seropositive but PCR-negative individuals were assessed. Results: The adjusted seropositivity rate for total Ab among 880 PCR-negative close-contacts TRANS was 4.1% (95%CI, 2.9% to 5.7%), significantly higher than among residents without known exposure to cases (0.0%, 95%CI, 0.0% to 1.0%). PCR-positive cases were 8.0 times (RR; 95% CI, 5.3 to 12.7) more likely to report symptoms than the PCR-negative individuals who were seropositive, but otherwise similar. RT-PCR missed 36% (95%CI, 28% to 44%) of infected close-contacts TRANS, and false negative rates appear to be highly dependent on stage of infection MESHD. Limitations: No serological data were available on PCR-positive cases. Sample size was limited, and only 20% of PCR-negative contacts met inclusion criteria. Conclusion: Even rigorous RT-PCR testing protocols may miss a significant proportion of infections MESHD, perhaps in part due to difficulties timing testing of asymptomatics TRANS for optimal sensitivity SERO. Surveillance and control protocols relying on RT-PCR were, nevertheless, able to contain community spread in Shenzhen.

    Screening Antibodies SERO Raised Against the Spike Glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 to Support the Development of Rapid Antigen Assays

    Authors: Jason Cantera; David Cate; Allison Golden; Roger Peck; Lorraine Lillis; Gonzalo Domingo; Eileen Murphy; Bryan Barnhart; Caitlin E Anderson; Luis F Alonzo; Veronika Glukhova; Gleda Hermansky; Brianda Barrios-Lopez; Ethan Spencer; Samantha Kuhn; Zeba Islam; Benjamin Grant; Lucas Kraft; Karine Herve; Valentine de Puyraimond; Yuri Hwang; Puneet K Dewan; Bernhard H Weigl; Kevin P Nichols; David Boyle

    doi:10.26434/chemrxiv.12899672.v1 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: ChemRxiv

    The spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 is a highly conserved surface protein and as such may represent a good target for immunoassay SERO detection. We screened a variety of antibodies SERO that were reactive to the S glycoprotein in a highly sensitive liquid immunoassay SERO format and also on paper-based or lateral flow assay (LFA) to assess their analytical performance SERO. Our findings included significant variation in performance SERO when using different sources of S antigen. We identified several antibody SERO pairs that had an LOD of below 10 pg/mL in the liquid immunoassay SERO format with the lowest being 3 pg/mL. The antibodies SERO were highly specific to SARS-Cov-2 based on cross reactivity screening with other human CoVs. The LFA screening found some different optimal antibody SERO pairs from the pool of candidate antibodies SERO used but a several antibodies SERO were observed to have high performance SERO with either immunoassay SERO format.

    Comparative performance SERO of five commercially available serologic assays to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO and identify individuals with high neutralizing titers

    Authors: Eshan Patel; Evan M Bloch; William Clarke; Yu-Hsiang Hsieh; Denali Boon; Yolanda J Eby; Reinaldo E Fernandez; Owen R Baker; Morgan Keruly; Charles S Kirby; Ethan Klock; Kirsten Littlefield; Jernelle Miller; Haley A Schmidt; Philip Sullivan; Estelle Piwowar-Manning; Ruchee Shrestha; Andrew D Redd; Richard Eric Rothman; David J Sullivan; Shmuel Shoham; Arturo Casadevall; Thomas C. Quinn; Andrew Pekosz; Aaron AR Tobian; Oliver Laeyendecker; William Damsky; David van Dijk; Alfred Ian Lee; Hyung Chun; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20184788 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Accurate serological assays SERO to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO are needed to characterize the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and identify potential candidates for COVID-19 convalescent plasma SERO (CCP) donation. This study compared the performance SERO of commercial enzyme immunoassays SERO (EIAs) to detect IgG or total antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 and neutralizing SERO antibodies SERO (nAb). The diagnostic accuracy of five commercially available EIAs (Abbott, Euroimmun, EDI, ImmunoDiagnostics, and Roche) to detect IgG or total antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO was evaluated from cross-sectional samples of potential CCP donors that had prior molecular confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD for sensitivity SERO (n=214) and pre-pandemic emergency department patients for specificity (n=1,102). Of the 214 potential CCP donors, all were sampled >14 days since symptom onset TRANS and only a minority had been hospitalized due to COVID-19 (n=16 [7.5%]); 140 potential CCP donors were tested by all five EIAs and a microneutralization assay. When performed according to the manufacturers protocol to detect IgG or total antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO, the sensitivity SERO of each EIA ranged from 76.4% to 93.9%, and the specificity of each EIA ranged from 87.0% to 99.6%. Using a nAb titer cutoff of [≥]160 as the reference positive test (n=140 CCP donors), the empirical area under receiver operating curve of each EIA ranged from 0.66 (Roche) to 0.90 (Euroimmun). Commercial EIAs with high diagnostic accuracy to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO did not necessarily have high diagnostic accuracy to detect high nAbs. Some but not all commercial EIAs may be useful in the identification of individuals with high nAbs in convalescent individuals.

    A comprehensive analysis of recovered COVID-19 patients and dynamic trend in antibodies SERO over 3 months using ELISA SERO and CLIA methods.

    Authors: Puya Dehgani-Mobaraki; Asiya Kamber Zaidi; Alessandro Floridi; Alessandro Lepri; Emanuela Floridi; Alessia Gherardi; Enrico Bernini-Carri; Eleonora Durzo; Massoud Dehgani-Mobaraki; Angeline Grullon; Karen Diaz; Mariano Morales; Melanie De Jesus; Sonia Pena; Luis Rodriguez; Lenin Pena; Ana Asaro; Magda Magris; Sharon Christie; Angela Afonso; Marc Veldhoen; Matthew Harnett; Melody Eaton; Sandra Hatem; Hajra Jamal; Alara Akyatan; Alexandra Tabachnikova; Lora E. Liharska; Liam Cotter; Brian Fennessey; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20184838 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Since the Coronavirus disease-2019 outbreak, most studies have focused on etiopathogenic aspects and treatment strategies. Acquired immunity still remains a dilemma. The aim of our study included a comprehensive analysis of patient characteristics, evaluation of antibody SERO response, and its trend over a period of three months in recovered patients. Methods: Monocentric investigator-initiated pilot longitudinal observational study conducted by the Association Naso Sano, on a cohort of 30 COVID recovered patients based in the Umbria region, followed up from April to June 2020 for baseline blood SERO counts, IgM and IgG trends using two different serological assays SERO- ELISA SERO and CLIA. The demographics, blood SERO group, co-morbidities and treatment modalities were recorded from each patient along with an analysis of clinical profile, dates concerning symptom onset TRANS, first positive and two consecutive negative swabs using an online questionnaire followed by serological testing SERO. Descriptive and Bivariate (Pearson correlation coefficient) statistics were conducted to detect statistically significant correlations. Findings: The study involved 30 patients with a M:F ratio of 0.57 and a distribution of mild (67%), moderate (30%) and critical (3%). Majority of the patients were healthcare workers (40%) and the mean viral shedding duration was 20.13 +/- 6.17 days. The IgG levels offered long-standing protection as long as 3 months in some cases. A statistically significant, directly proportional correlation (Pearson) exists between ELISA SERO and CLIA values for IgM. Some patients also expressed titers lower than the detection threshold and therefore a positive RT-PCR test does not necessarily guarantee a high IgG response in the recovery period. Interpretation: The data presented in our study provides a relative long-term analysis and possible explanation regarding the protection developed by patients recovered from COVID-19.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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