Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (17)

Pneumonia (7)

Anosmia (7)

Cough (6)

Falls (5)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 41 - 50 records in total 381
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    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J Abu-Raddad; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184705 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Methods: An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions. Results: The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak. Conclusions: Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Evaluation of production lots of a rapid point-of-care lateral flow serological test SERO intended for identification of IgM and IgG against the N-terminal part of the spike protein (S1) of SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Tove Hoffman; Linda Kolstad; Bengt Ronnberg; Ake Lundkvist; Ben Warne; Luke Meredith; Myra Hosmillo; Aminu Jahun; Martin Curran; Surendra Parmar; Laura Caller; Sarah Caddy; Fahad Khokhar; Anna Yakovleva; Grant Hall; Theresa Feltwell; Malte Pinckert; Iliana Georgana; Yasmin Chaudhry; Nicholas Brown; Sonia Goncalves; Roberto Amato; Ewan Harrison; Mathew Beale; Michael Spencer Chapman; David Jackson; Ian Johnston; Alex Alderton; John Sillitoe; Cordelia Langford; Gordon Dougan; Sharon Peacock; Dominic Kwiatowski; Ian Goodfellow; M. Estee Torok; - COVID-19 Genomics Consortium UK

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.27.20182923 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background and objectives: Several antibody tests SERO are available to detect SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies SERO, many of which address different antigens. Rapid point-of-care ( POC) tests SERO have been doubted due to an eventual risk of production errors, although it is unstudied whether such error would affect test sensitivity SERO and/or specificity. We aimed to evaluate two separate production lots of a commercially available test intended for rapid detection of IgM and IgG against the N-terminal part of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (S1). Materials and methods: Serum samples SERO from individuals with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, by RT-PCR and/or serology, and pre-COVID-19 negative control sera gathered from a biobank during 2018 were collected. The presence of anti-S1 IgM/IgG was verified by an in-house Luminex-based serological assay SERO, serving as reference method. The index test was a commercially available rapid POC-test SERO (the COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO Cassette [Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech Co Ltd, Huzhou, Zhejiang, China/Healgen Scientific, LLC, U.S.A.]). Results: One hundred samples were verified positive for anti-S1 IgG (median fluorescence intensity (MFI) greater than or equal to 900) and 74 for anti-S1 IgM (MFI greater than or equal to 700), confirmed by RT-PCR (n=90) and/or serology (n=89). None of the negative controls (n=200; MFI <300) had SARS-CoV-2 anti-S1 IgM, while one tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 anti-S1 IgG. For the two lots, the sensitivities SERO of the rapid test SERO were 93.2% (69/74; 95% CI: 85.1% - 97.1%) and 87.8% (65/74; 95% CI: 78.5% - 93.5%) for IgM, respectively 93.0% (93/100; 95% CI: 86.3% - 96.6%) and 100.0% for IgG (100/100; 95% CI: 96.3% - 100.0%). The specificity for both lots was 100% for IgM (200/200; 95% CI: 98.1% - 100%) and 99.5% for IgG (199/200; 95% CI: 97.2% - 99.9%). The positive predictive value SERO was 100% for IgM and 98.9% and 99.0% for IgG. The negative predictive value SERO was 95.7% and 97.6% for IgM, and 96.6% and 100.0% for IgG. Conclusion: The rapid POC-test SERO used in this study is suitable to assess SARS-CoV-2 anti-S1 specific IgM/IgG, as a measure of previous virus exposure on an individual level. While the specificity was not affected by production lot, external validation of separate lots of rapid POC-tests SERO is encouraged to ensure high sensitivity SERO before market introduction.

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in Palestine: a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study

    Authors: Nouar Qutob; Faisal Awartani; Zaidoun Salah; Mohammad Asia; Imad Abu Khader; Khaled Herzallah; Nadeen Balqis; Husam Sallam; William Wade; Jennifer Gallagher; Cecile Viboud; Hongjie Yu; Lars I Eriksson; Anna Norrby-Teglund; Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren; Niklas K Bjorkstrom; Soo Aleman; Marcus Buggert; Jonas Klingstrom; Kristoffer Stralin; Johan K. Sandberg

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180083 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Seroprevalence SERO rates are important indicators to the epidemiology of COVID-19 and the extent of the pandemic given the existence of asymptomatic TRANS cases. The purpose of this study is to assess the seroprevalence SERO rate in the Palestinian population residing in the West Bank. Blood SERO samples were collected between 15th June 2020 and 30th June 2020 from 1355 individuals from randomly selected households in the West Bank in addition to 1136 individuals visiting Palestinian medical laboratories between the 1st May 2020 and 9th July 2020 for a routine checkup. Out of the 2491 blood SERO samples collected, serological tests SERO for 2455 adequate serum samples SERO were done using an Immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 .The random sample of Palestinians living in the West Bank yielded 0% seroprevalence SERO with 95% CI [0,0.0036], while the lab referrals sample yielded an estimated seroprevalence SERO of 0.354% with 95% CI [0.0011,0096]. Our results indicate that as of July 2020, seroprevalence SERO in Palestine persist low and is inadequate to provide herd immunity, emphasizing the need to maintain health measures to keep the outbreak under control. Population-based seroprevalence SERO studies are to be conducted periodically to monitor the SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Palestine and inform policy makers about the efficacy of their surveillance system.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J. Abu-Raddad

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-70006/v1 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics.Methods An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions.Results The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak.Conclusions Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Antibody SERO response to SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans: a systematic review

    Authors: Nathan Post; Danielle Eddy; Catherine Huntley; May C. I. van Schalkwyk; Madhumita Shrotri; David Leeman; Samuel Rigby; Sarah V. Williams; William H. Bermingham; Paul Kellam; John Maher; Adrian M Shields; Gayatri Amirthalingam; Sharon J. Peacock; Sharif A. Ismail; Holly Shelton; Anna Barbara Ludi; G Wilsden; Clare Browning; Adrian Zagrajek; Dagmara Bialy; Sushant Bhat; Phoebe Stevenson-Leggett; Philippa Hollinghurst; Matthew Tully; Katy Moffat; Chris Chiu; Ryan Waters; Ashley Gray; Mehreen Azhar; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.25.20178806 Date: 2020-08-30 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Progress in characterising the humoral immune response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been rapid but areas of uncertainty persist. This review comprehensively evaluated evidence describing the antibody SERO response to SARS-CoV-2 published from 01/01/2020-26/06/2020. Methods Systematic review. Keyword-structured searches were carried out in MEDLINE, Embase and COVID-19 Primer. Articles were independently screened on title, abstract and full text by two researchers, with arbitration of disagreements. Data were double-extracted into a pre-designed template, and studies critically appraised using a modified version of the MetaQAT tool, with resolution of disagreements by consensus. Findings were narratively synthesised. Results 150 papers were included. Most studies (75%) were observational in design, and included papers were generally of moderate quality based on hospitalised patients. Few considered mild or asymptomatic TRANS infection. Antibody SERO dynamics were well described in the acute phase, and up to around 3 months from disease onset, although inconsistencies remain concerning clinical correlates. Development of neutralising antibodies SERO following SARS-CoV-2 infection is typical, although titres may be low. Specific and potent neutralising antibodies SERO have been isolated from convalescent plasma SERO. Cross reactivity but limited cross neutralisation occurs with other HCoVs. Evidence for protective immunity in vivo is limited to small, short-term animal studies, which show promising initial results in the immediate recovery phase. Interpretation Published literature on immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 is of variable quality with considerable heterogeneity with regard to methods, study participants, outcomes measured and assays used. Antibody SERO dynamics have been evaluated thoroughly in the acute phase but longer follow up and a comprehensive assessment of the role of demographic characteristics and disease severity is needed. The role of protective neutralising antibodies SERO is emerging, with implications for therapeutics and vaccines. Large, cross-national cohort studies using appropriate statistical analysis and standardised serological assays SERO and clinical classifications should be prioritised.

    Seroprevalence SERO and correlates of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO: Results from a population-based study in Bonn, Germany

    Authors: N. Ahmad Aziz; Victor M Corman; Antje K.C. Echterhoff; Anja Richter; Antonio Schmandke; Marie Luisa Schmidt; Thomas H. Schmidt; Folgerdiena M De Vries; Christian Drosten; Monique M.B. Breteler; Charles E Murry; Michel C Nussenzweig; Anthony P West; Pamela J Bjorkman; Tong Jin; Chengmin Shi; Zhenglin Du; Yadong Zhang; Chuandong Liu; Rujiao Li; Jingyao Zeng; Lili Hao; Shuai Jiang; Hua Chen; Dali Han; Jingfa Xiao; Zhang Zhang; Wenming Zhao; Yongbiao Xue; Yiming Bao; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.24.20181206 Date: 2020-08-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background Accurate estimates of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO are crucial for the implementation of effective public health measures, but are currently largely lacking in regions with low infection rates. This is further complicated by inadequate test performance SERO of many widely used serological assays SERO. We therefore aimed to assess SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in a region with low COVID-19 burden, especially focusing on neutralizing antibodies SERO that presumably constitute a major component of acquired immunity. Methods We invited all individuals who were enrolled in the Rhineland Study, an ongoing community-based prospective cohort study in people aged TRANS 30 years and above in the city of Bonn, Germany (N=5427). Between April 24th and June 30th, 2020, 4771 (88%) of these individuals participated in the serosurvey. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels were measured using an ELISA assay SERO, and all positive or borderline results were subsequently examined through both a recombinant immunofluorescent assay and a plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT). Findings Seroprevalence SERO was 0.97% (95% CI: 0.72-1.30) by ELISA SERO and 0.36% (95% CI: 0.21-0.61) by PRNT, and did not vary with either age TRANS or sex. All PRNT+ individuals reported having experienced at least one symptom (odds ratio (OR) of PRNT+ for each additional symptom: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.21)). Apart from living in a household with a SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected person, a recent history of reduced taste or smell, fever HP, chills HP/ hot flashes HP, pain HP while breathing, pain HP in arms/legs, as well as muscle pain HP and weakness were significantly associated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies SERO in those with mild to moderate infection (ORs 3.44 to 9.97, all p<0.018). Interpretation Our findings indicate a relatively low SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Bonn, Germany (until June 30th, 2020), with neutralizing antibodies SERO detectable in only one third of those with a positive immunoassay SERO result, implying that almost the entire population in this region remains susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Establishment of murine hybridoma cells producing antibodies SERO against spike protein of SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Nadezhda V Antipova; Tatyana D Larionova; Michail I Shakhparonov; Marat S Pavlyukov; Yong Kyu Lee; Arthur Feltrin; Joyce van de Leemput; Pasquale Di Carlo; Tomoyo Sawada; Kynon J. Benjamin; Helena Brentani; Joel E Kleinman; Thomas M Hyde; Daniel A Weinberger; Gianluca Ursini; Ronald McKay; Apua C.M. Paquola; Joo Heon Shin; Jennifer A Erwin; Rujiao Li; Jingyao Zeng; Lili Hao; Shuai Jiang; Hua Chen; Dali Han; Jingfa Xiao; Zhang Zhang; Wenming Zhao; Yongbiao Xue; Yiming Bao; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.29.272963 Date: 2020-08-29 Source: bioRxiv

    In 2020 the world faced the pandemic of COVID-19 - severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by a new type of coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2. To stop the spread of the disease TRANS, it is crucial to create molecular tools allowing to investigate, diagnose and treat COVID-19. One of such tools are monoclonal antibodies SERO (mAbs). In this study we describe the development of hybridoma cells that can produce mouse mAbs against receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein. These mAbs are able to specifically detect native and denaturized S protein in all tested applications including immunoblotting, immunofluorescence staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO. In addition, we showed that the obtained mAbs decreased infection rate of human cells by SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus particles in in vitro experiments. Finally, we determined the amino acid sequence of light and heavy chains of the mAbs. This information will allow to use the corresponding peptides to establish genetically engineered therapeutic antibodies SERO. To date multiple mAbs against SARS-CoV-2 proteins have been established, however due to the restrictions caused by pandemic, it is imperative to have a local source of the antibodies SERO suitable for researches and diagnostics of COVID-19. Moreover, as each mAb has a unique binding sequence, bigger sets of various antibodies SERO will allow to detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins even if the virus acquires novel mutations.

    Multi-species ELISA SERO for the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in animals

    Authors: Kerstin Wernike; Andrea Aebischer; Anna Michelitsch; Donata Hoffmann; Conrad Freuling; Anne Balkema-Buschmann; Annika Graaf; Thomas Mueller; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Melanie Rissmann; Dennis Rubbenstroth; Jacob Schoen; Claudia Schulz; Jakob Trimpert; Lorenz Ulrich; Asisa Volz; Thomas Mettenleiter; Martin Beer; Thamar Loser; Susanne Mangold; Christel Herzog; Dieter Schiegg; Christian Reichen; Filip Radom; Andreas Bosshart; Andreas Lehmann; Micha A. Haeuptle; Alexander Zuercher; Toni Vagt; Gabriel Sigrist; Marcel Straumann; Karl Proba; Niina Veitonmaki; Keith M. Dawson; Christof Zitt; Jennifer Mayor; Sarah Ryter; Heyrhyoung Lyoo; Chunyan Wang; Wentao Li; Ieva Drulyte; H. Kaspar Binz; Leon de Waal; Koert J. Stittelaar; Seth Lewis; Daniel Steiner; Frank J.M. van Kuppeveld; Olivier Engler; Berend-Jan Bosch; Michael T. Stumpp; Patrick Amstutz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.26.266825 Date: 2020-08-26 Source: bioRxiv

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic with millions of infected humans and hundreds of thousands of fatalities. As the novel disease - referred to as COVID-19 - unfolded, occasional anthropozoonotic infections of animals by owners or caretakers were reported in dogs, felid species and farmed mink. Further species were shown to be susceptible under experimental conditions. The extent of natural infections of animals, however, is still largely unknown. Serological methods will be useful tools for tracing TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in animals once test systems are validated for use in different species. Here, we developed an indirect multi-species ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. The newly established ELISA SERO was validated using 59 sera of infected MESHD or vaccinated animals including ferrets, raccoon dogs, hamsters, rabbits, chickens, cattle and a cat, and a total of 220 antibody SERO-negative sera of the same animal species. Overall, a diagnostic specificity of 100.0% and sensitivity SERO of 98.31% was achieved, and the functionality with every species included in this study could be demonstrated. Hence, a versatile and reliable ELISA SERO protocol was established that enables high-throughput antibody SERO detection in a broad range of animal species, which may be used for outbreak investigations, to assess the seroprevalence SERO in susceptible species or to screen for reservoir or intermediate hosts.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO in hospitalized patients in a tertiary referral center in North India

    Authors: Animesh Ray; Komal Singh; Souvick Chattopadhyay; Farha Mehdi; Gaurav Batra; Aakansha Gupta; Ayush Agarwal; Bhavesh M; Shubham Sahni; Chaithra R; Shubham Agarwal; Chitrakshi Nagpal; Gagantej B H; Umang Arora; Kartikeya Kumar Sharma; Ranveer Singh Jadon; Ashish Datt Upadhyay; Neeraj Nischal; Naval K Vikram; Manish Soneja; R M Pandey; Naveet Wig; Alessandra C. Sanchez; Haifa L. Gaza; Geraldine M. Arevalo; Coleen M. Pangilinan; Shaira A. Acosta; Melanie V. Salinas; Brian E. Schwem; Angelo D. Dela Tonga; Ma. Jowina H. Galarion; Nina Theresa P. Dungca; Stessi G. Geganzo; Neil Andrew D. Bascos; Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz; Cynthia P. Saloma; Alberto L Garcia-Basteiro

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.22.20179937 Date: 2020-08-25 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Seroprevalence SERO of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 is an important tool to estimate the true extent of infection MESHD in a population. However, seroprevalence SERO studies have been scarce in South East Asia including India, which, as of now, carries the third largest burden of confirmed cases TRANS in the world. The present study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO among hospitalized patients at one of the largest government hospital in India. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a tertiary care hospital in North India, recruited consecutive patients who were negative for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR or CB-NAAT. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO levels targeting recombinant spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein of SARS CoV-2 were estimated in serum samples SERO by the ELISA SERO method. Results: A total of 212 hospitalized patients were recruited in the study with mean age TRANS (+/-SD) of 41.2 (+/-15.4) years and 55% male TRANS population. Positive serology against SARS CoV-2 was detected in 19.8% patients(95% CI 14.7-25.8). Residency in Delhi conferred a higher frequency of seropositivity 26.5% (95% CI 19.3-34.7) as compared to that of other states 8% (95% CI 3.0-16.4) with p-value 0.001. No particular age groups TRANS or socio-economic strata showed a higher proportion of seropositivity. Conclusion: Around, one-fifth of hospitalized patients, who were not diagnosed with COVID-19 before, demonstrated seropositivity against SARS-CoV-2. While there was no significant difference in the different age groups TRANS and socio-economic classes; residence in Delhi was associated with increased risk (relative risk of 3.62, 95% CI 1.59-8.21) Key Words: SARS-CoV-2 IgG Antibody SERO, Seroprevalence SERO, Hospitalized patient, COVID-19

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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