Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (14)

Anosmia (5)

Cough (4)

Dyspnea (3)

Pneumonia (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 31 - 40 records in total 108
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    Neutralizing antibody SERO response in non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 patients

    Authors: Natalia Ruetalo; Ramona Businger; Karina Althaus; Simon Fink; Felix Ruoff; Klaus Hamprecht; Bertram Flehmig; Tamam Bakchould; Markus F Templin; Michael Schindler

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.20169961 Date: 2020-08-07 Source: medRxiv

    The majority of infections with SARS-CoV-2 ( SCoV2 MESHD) are asymptomatic TRANS or mild without the necessity of hospitalization. It is of outmost importance to reveal if these patients develop an antibody SERO response against SCoV2 MESHD and to define which antibodies SERO confer virus neutralization. We hence conducted a comprehensive serological survey of 49 patients with a mild course of disease and quantified neutralizing antibody SERO responses against authentic SCoV2 MESHD employing human cells as targets. Four patients (8%), even though symptomatic, did not develop antibodies SERO against SCoV2 MESHD and two other sera (4%) were only positive in one of the serological assays SERO employed. For the remainder, antibody SERO response against the S-protein correlated with serum SERO neutralization whereas antibodies SERO against the nucleocapsid were poor predictors of virus neutralization. Only six sera (12%) could be classified as highly neutralizing. Furthermore, sera from several individuals with fairly high antibody SERO levels had only poor neutralizing activity. In addition, our data suggest that antibodies SERO against the seasonal coronavirus 229E contribute to SCoV2 MESHD neutralization. Altogether, we show that there is a wide breadth of antibody SERO responses against SCoV2 MESHD in patients that differentially correlate with virus neutralization. This highlights the difficulty to define reliable surrogate markers for immunity against SCoV2 MESHD.

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    Detection of asymptomatic TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD among healthcare workers: results from a large-scale screening program based on rapid serological testing SERO.

    Authors: Francesca Maria Carozzi; Maria Grazia Cusi; Mauro Pistello; Luisa Galli; Alessandro Bartoloni; Gabriele Anichini; Chiara Azzari; Michele Emdin; Claudia Gandolfo; Fabrizio Maggi; Elisabetta Mantengoli; Maria Moriondo; Giovanna Moscato; Irene Paganini; Claudio Passino; Francesco Profili; Fabio Voller; Marco Zappa; Filippo Quattrone; Gian Maria Rossolini; Paolo Francesconi; - SARS-CoV-2 Serosurvey Tuscan Working Group

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20149567 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the performance SERO of two available rapid immunological tests for identification of severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 MESHD ( SARS-CoV-2) antibodies SERO and their subsequent application to a regional screening of health care workers (HCW) in Tuscany (Italy). Design: measures of accuracy and HCW serological surveillance Setting: 6 major health facilities in Tuscany, Italy. Participants: 17,098 HCW of the Tuscany Region. Measures of accuracy were estimated to assess sensitivity SERO in 176 hospitalized Covid-19 clinical subjects at least 14 days after a diagnostic PCR-positive assay result. Specificity was assessed in 295 sera biobanked in the pre-Covid-19 era in winter or summer 2013-14 Main outcome measures: Sensitivity SERO and specificity, and 95% confidence intervals, were measured using two serological tests SERO, named T-1 and T-2. Positive and Negative predictive values SERO were estimated at different levels of prevalence SERO. HCW of the health centers were tested using the serological SERO tests, with a follow- up nasopharyngeal PCR-test swab in positive tested cases. Results: Sensitivity SERO was estimated as 99% (95%CI: 95%-100%) and 97% (95% CI: 90%-100%), whereas specificity was the 95% and 92%, for Test T-1 and T-2 respectively. In the historical samples IgM cross-reactions were detected in sera collected during the winter period, probably linked to other human coronaviruses. Out of the 17,098 tested, 3.1% have shown the presence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, among them 6.8% were positive at PCR follow-up test on nasopharyngeal swabs. Conclusion Based on the low prevalence SERO estimate observed in this survey, the use of serological test SERO as a stand-alone test is not justified to assess the individual immunity status. Serological tests SERO showed good performance SERO and might be useful in an integrated surveillance, for identification of infected subjects and their contacts as required by the policy of contact tracing TRANS, with the aim to reduce the risk of dissemination, especially in health service facilities.

    Assessment of a Laboratory-Based SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Test Among Hemodialysis Patients: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    Authors: Dena E Cohen; Gilbert Marlowe; Gabriel Contreras; Marie Ann Sosa; Jair Munoz Mendoza; Oliver Lenz; Zain Mithani; Pura Margarita Teixeiro; Nery Queija; Araceli Moneda; Jean S Jeanty; Katherine Swanzy; Misha Palecek; Mahesh Krishnan; Jeffery Giullian; Steven M Brunelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20163642 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction: The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID -19) pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS -CoV -2) infection. Although tests to detect anti - SARS -CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been developed, their sensitivity SERO and specificity in hemodialysis patients have not been previously assessed. Methods: As part of a quality improvement (QI) initiative, nasopharyngeal swabs and predialysis blood SERO samples were collected on the same day from adult TRANS patients receiving routine hemodialysis care at clinics managed by a large dialysis organization in the greater Miami, Florida region (23 - 30 Apr 2020). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for SARS -CoV -2 and chemiluminescence immunoassays SERO for anti -SARS -CoV2 antibodies SERO were performed according to manufacturer-specified protocols. Results: Of 715 participants in the QI initiative, 38 had symptomatology consistent with COVID -19 prior to or during the initiative. Among these, COVID -19 was PCR -confirmed in 14 and ruled out in 20, with the remaining 4 being inconclusive. Among the 34 patients with known COVID -19 status, the sensitivity SERO and specificity of the antibody test SERO were 57.1% and 85.0% when either antibody SERO was considered. The remaining 677 patients had no record of symptoms consistent with COVID -19, nor any known exposure. Of these, 38 patients (5.6%) tested positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Conclusions: The operational characteristics of the laboratory-based antibody test SERO make it sufficient to rule in, but not rule out, SARS -CoV -2 infection in the appropriate clinical circumstance. A substantial proportion of dialysis patients may have had asymptomatic TRANS SARS -CoV -2 infection.

    Reconciling epidemiological models with misclassified case-counts for SARS-CoV-2 with seroprevalence SERO surveys: A case study in Delhi, India

    Authors: Rupam Bhattacharyya; Ritwik Bhaduri; Ritoban Kundu; Maxwell Salvatore; Bhramar Mukherjee

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166249 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Underreporting of COVID-19 cases and deaths is a hindrance to correctly modeling and monitoring the pandemic. This is primarily due to limited testing, lack of reporting infrastructure and a large number of asymptomatic TRANS infections MESHD. In addition, diagnostic tests (RT-PCR tests for detecting current infection MESHD) and serological antibody tests SERO for IgG (to assess past infections MESHD) are imperfect. In particular, the diagnostic tests have a high false negative rate. Epidemiologic models with a latent compartment for unascertained infections like the Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Removed (SEIR) models can provide predictions for unreported cases and deaths under certain assumptions. Typically, the number of unascertained cases is unobserved and thus we cannot validate these estimates for a real study except for simulation studies. Population-based seroprevalence SERO studies can provide a rough estimate of the total number of infections MESHD and help us check epidemiologic model projections. In this paper, we develop a method to account for high false negative rates in RT-PCR in an extension to the classic SEIR model. We apply this method to Delhi, the national capital region of India, with a population of 19.8 million and a COVID-19 hotspot of the country, obtaining estimates of underreporting factor for cases at 34-53 times and that for deaths MESHD at 8-13 times. Based on a recently released serological survey for Delhi with an estimated 22.86% seroprevalence SERO, we compute adjusted estimates of the true number of infections MESHD reported by the survey (after accounting for misclassification of the antibody test SERO results) which is largely consistent with the model outputs, yielding an underreporting factor for cases from 30-42. Together with the model and the serosurvey, this implies approximately 96-98% cases in Delhi remained unreported and whereas only 109,140 cases were reported on July 10, the true number of infections varied somewhere between 4.4-4.6 million across different estimates. While repeated serological monitoring is resource intensive, model-based adjustments, run with the most up to date data, can provide a viable option to keep track of the unreported cases and deaths MESHD and gauge the true extent of transmission TRANS of this insidious virus.

    Comparison of sixteen serological SARS-CoV-2 immunoassays SERO in sixteen clinical laboratories

    Authors: Lene Holm Harritshoej; Mikkel Gybel-Brask; Shoaib Afzal; Pia R. Kamstrup; Charlotte Svaerke Joergensen; Marianne K. Thomsen; Linda M. Hilsted; Lennart J. Friis-Hansen; Pal B. Szecsi; Lise Pedersen; Lene Nielsen; Cecilie B. Hansen; Peter Garred; Trine-Line Korsholm; Susan Mikkelsen; Kirstine O. Nielsen; Bjarne K. Moeller; Anne T. Hansen; Kasper K. Iversen; Pernille B. Nielsen; Rasmus B. Hasselbalch; Kamille Fogh; Jakob B. Norsk; Jonas H. Kristensen; Kristian Schoenning; Nikolai S. Kirkby; Alex C.Y. Nielsen; Lone H. Landsy; Mette Loftager; Dorte K. Holm; Anna C. Nilsson; Susanne G. Saekmose; Birgitte Grum-Svendsen; Bitten Aagaard; Thoeger G. Jensen; Dorte M. Nielsen; Henrik Ullum; Ram BC Dessau

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20165373 Date: 2020-08-02 Source: medRxiv

    Serological SARS-CoV-2 assays are needed to support clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. Recently, assays for the large-volume detection of total antibodies SERO (Ab) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M against SARS-CoV-2 antigens have been developed, but there are limited data on the diagnostic accuracy of these assays. This study was organized as a Danish national collaboration and included fifteen commercial and one in-house anti-SARS-CoV-2 assays in sixteen laboratories. Sensitivity SERO was evaluated using 150 serum samples SERO from individuals diagnosed with asymptomatic TRANS, mild or moderate nonhospitalized (n=129) or hospitalized (n=31) COVID-19, confirmed by nucleic acid amplification tests, collected 13-73 days from symptom onset TRANS. Specificity and cross-reactivity were evaluated in samples collected prior to the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic from > 586 blood SERO donors and patients with autoimmune diseases MESHD or CMV or EBV infections MESHD. Predefined specificity criteria of [≥]99% were met by all total-Ab and IgG assays except one (Diasorin/LiaisonXL-IgG 97.2%). The sensitivities SERO in descending order were: Wantai/ ELISA SERO total-Ab (96.7%), CUH/NOVO in-house ELISA SERO total-Ab (96.0%), Ortho/Vitros total-Ab (95.3%), YHLO/iFlash-IgG (94.0%), Ortho/Vitros-IgG (93.3%), Siemens/Atellica total-Ab (93.2%), Roche-Elecsys total-Ab (92.7%), Abbott-Architect-IgG (90.0%), Abbott/Alinity-IgG (median 88.0%), Diasorin/LiaisonXL-IgG MESHD (84.6%), Siemens/Vista total-Ab (81.0%), Euroimmun/ ELISA-IgG SERO (78.0%), and Snibe/Maglumi-IgG (median 78.0%). The IgM results were variable, but one assay (Wantai/ ELISA SERO-IgM) had both high sensitivity SERO (82.7%) and specificity (99%). The rate of seropositivity increased with time from symptom onset TRANS and symptom severity. In conclusion, predefined sensitivity SERO and specificity acceptance criteria of 90%/99%, respectively, for diagnostic use were met in five of six total-Ab and three of seven IgG assays.

    High SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Health Care Workers but relatively low numbers of deaths in urban Malawi

    Authors: Marah Grace Chibwana; Khuzwayo Chidiwa Jere; Jonathan Mandolo; Vincent Katunga-Phiri; Dumizulu Tembo; Ndaona Mitole; Samantha Musasa; Simon Sichone; Agness Lakudzala; Lusako Sibale; Prisca Matambo; Innocent Kadwala; Rachel Louise Byrne; Alice Mbewe; Marc Y.R. Henrion; Ben Morton; Chimota Phiri; Jane Mallewa; Henry C Mwandumba; Emily R Adams; Stephen B Gordon; Kondwani Charles Jambo

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164970 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background In low-income countries, like Malawi, important public health measures including social distancing or a lockdown, have been challenging to implement owing to socioeconomic constraints, leading to predictions that the COVID-19 pandemic would progress rapidly. However, due to limited capacity to test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD, there are no reliable estimates of the true burden of infection MESHD and death MESHD. We, therefore, conducted a SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey amongst health care workers (HCW) in Blantyre city to estimate the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in urban Malawi. Methods Five hundred otherwise asymptomatic TRANS HCWs were recruited from Blantyre City (Malawi) from 22nd May 2020 to 19th June 2020 and serum samples SERO were collected all participants. A commercial ELISA SERO was used to measure SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in serum SERO. We run local negative samples (2018 - 2019) to verify the specificity of the assay. To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV-2 antibodies SERO, we adjusted the proportion of positive results based on local specificity of the assay. Results Eighty-four participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The HCW with a positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO result came from different parts of the city. The adjusted seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO was 12.3% [CI 9.0-15.7]. Using age TRANS-stratified infection MESHD fatality estimates reported from elsewhere, we found that at the observed adjusted seroprevalence SERO, the number of predicted deaths MESHD was 8 times the number of reported deaths MESHD. Conclusion The high seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO among HCW and the discrepancy in the predicted versus reported deaths MESHD, suggests that there was early exposure but slow progression of COVID-19 epidemic in urban Malawi. This highlights the urgent need for development of locally parameterised mathematical models to more accurately predict the trajectory of the epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa for better evidence-based policy decisions and public health response planning.

    Estimates of the rate of infection MESHD and asymptomatic TRANS COVID-19 disease in a population sample from SE England

    Authors: Philippa M Wells; Katie M Doores; Simon Couvreur; Rocio Martin Martinez; Jeffrey Seow; Carl Graham; Sam Acors; Neophytos Kouphou; Stuart Neil; Richard Tedder; Pedro Matos; Kate Poulton; Maria Jose Lista; Ruth Dickenson; Helin Sertkaya; Thomas Maguire; Edward Scourfield; Ruth Bowyer; Deborah Hart; Aoife O'Byrne; Kathryn Steele; Oliver Hemmings; Carolina Rosadas; Myra McClure; Joan Capedevila-Pujol; Jonathan wolf; Sebastien Ourseilin; Matthew Brown; Michael Malim; Timothy Spector; Claire Steves

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20162701 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Understanding of the true asymptomatic TRANS rate of infection of SARS-CoV-2 MESHD is currently limited, as is understanding of the population-based seroprevalence SERO after the first wave of COVID-19 within the UK. The majority of data thus far come from hospitalised patients, with little focus on general population cases, or their symptoms. Methods: We undertook enzyme linked immunosorbent assay SERO characterisation of IgM and IgG responses against SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of 431 unselected general-population participants of the TwinsUK cohort from South-East England, aged TRANS 19-86 (median age TRANS 48; 85% female TRANS). 382 participants completed prospective logging of 14 COVID-19 related symptoms via the COVID Symptom Study App, allowing consideration of serology alongside individual symptoms, and a predictive algorithm for estimated COVID-19 previously modelled on PCR positive individuals from a dataset of over 2 million. Findings: We demonstrated a seroprevalence SERO of 12% (51participants of 431). Of 48 seropositive individuals with full symptom data, nine (19%) were fully asymptomatic TRANS, and 16 (27%) were asymptomatic TRANS for core COVID-19 symptoms: fever HP fever MESHD, cough HP cough MESHD or anosmia HP anosmia MESHD. Specificity of anosmia HP anosmia MESHD for seropositivity was 95%, compared to 88% for fever HP fever MESHD cough HP and anosmia HP anosmia MESHD combined. 34 individuals in the cohort were predicted to be Covid-19 positive using the App algorithm, and of those, 18 (52%) were seropositive. Interpretation: Seroprevalence SERO amongst adults TRANS from London and South-East England was 12%, and 19% of seropositive individuals with prospective symptom logging were fully asymptomatic TRANS throughout the study. Anosmia HP demonstrated the highest symptom specificity for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO response. Funding: NIHR BRC, CDRF, ZOE global LTD, RST-UKRI/MRC

    Diagnostic accuracy of two commercially available rapid assays for detection of IgG and IgM antibodies SERO to SARS-CoV-2 compared to ELISA SERO in a low- prevalence SERO population

    Authors: Klaus Hackner; Peter Errhalt; Martin Willheim; Maria-Anna Grasl; Jasmina Lagumdzija; Waltraud Riegler; Michael Ecker; Matthias Wechdorn; Florian Thalhammer; Ojan Assadian

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-50887/v1 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: New commercially available point-of-care (POC) immunodiagnostic tests are appearing, which may yield rapid results for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of rapid antibody SERO detection tests compared to a validated laboratory-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO) and to investigate infections amongst healthcare workers (HCWs) after unprotected close contact TRANS to COVID-19 patients. Methods: Blood SERO serum SERO and whole blood SERO of 130 participants were tested with NADAL® COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test SERO and mö-screen 2019-NCOV Corona Virus Test against a validated ELISA SERO test. Infection status was evaluated using real-time polymerase-chain-reaction.Results: Acute COVID-19 infection MESHD was detected in 2.4% of exposed HCWs. Antibody tests SERO showed an overall frequency of IgG and IgM in 5.3%, with 1.6% asymptomatic TRANS infections MESHD. The NADAL® test showed a sensitivity SERO (IgM/ IgG) of 100% (100%/ 100%), a specificity (IgM/ IgG) of 98.8% (97.6%/ 100 %), a PPV of 76.9% (57.1%/ 100%), an NPV of 100% (100%/ 100%), and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.8% (97.7%/ 100%). The mö-screen test had a sensitivity SERO (IgM/IgG) of 90.9% (80%/ 100%), a specificity (IgM/IgG) of 98.8% (97.6%/ 100%), a PPV of 76.9% (57.1%/ 100%), an NPV of 99.6% (99.2%/ 100%), and a diagnostic accuracy of 98.5% (96.9%/ 100%). Conclusions: The frequency of COVID-19 infections MESHD in HCWs after unprotected close contact TRANS is higher than in the general population of a low- prevalence SERO country. Both POC tests SERO were useful for detecting IgG, but did not perform well for IgM, mainly due to false positive results.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO responses determine disease severity in COVID-19 infected individuals

    Authors: Cecilie Bo Hansen; Ida Jarlhelt; Laura Pérez-Alós; Lone Hummelshøj Landsy; Mette Loftager; Anne Rosbjerg; Charlotte Helgstrand; Jais Rose Bjelke; Thomas Egebjerg; Joseph G. Jardine; Charlotte Sværke Jørgensen; Kasper Iversen; Rafael Bayarri-Olmos; Peter Garred; Mikkel-Ole Skjoedt

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.27.20162321 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic has had extreme consequences for the healthcare system and calls for diagnostic tools to monitor and understand the transmission TRANS, pathogenesis and epidemiology, as well as to evaluate future vaccination strategies. Here we have developed novel flexible ELISA SERO-based assays for specific detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO against the receptor-binding domain (RBD): An antigen sandwich- ELISA SERO relevant for large population screening and three isotype-specific assays for in-depth diagnostics. Their performance SERO was evaluated in a cohort of 350 convalescent participants with previous COVID-19 infection, ranging from asymptomatic TRANS to critical cases. We mapped the antibody SERO responses to different areas on protein N and S and showed that the IgM, A and G antibody SERO responses against RBD are significantly correlated to the disease severity. These assays-and the data generated from them-are highly relevant for diagnostics and prognostics and contribute to the understanding of long-term COVID-19 immunity.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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