Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Fever (9)

Anosmia (6)

Cough (4)

Pneumonia (3)

Myalgia (3)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 21 - 30 records in total 181
    records per page




    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J Abu-Raddad; Xiaojian Liu; Wei Gao; Renli Zhang; Qiru Su; Andrew Azman; Justin Lessler; Xuan Zou; Wenfeng Gong; Brenda Clemente; Jerel Vega; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184705 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Background: Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics. Methods: An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions. Results: The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak. Conclusions: Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    Potential Community and Campus Covid-19 Outcomes Under University and College Reopening Scenarios

    Authors: James C Benneyan; Christopher Gehrke; Iulian Ilies; Nicole Nehls; Gro Jamtvedt; Borghild Loyland; Ida Hellum Sandbekken; Alexander Schjoll; Kjetil Telle; Sara Sofie Viksmoen Watle; Laura Vanessa Montes Fontalvo; Roger Hernandez; Carolin Chavez; Francisco Eduardo Campos; Fadia Uribe; Olguita del Aguila; JORGE ALBERTO RIOS AIDA; Andrea Parra Buitrago; Lina Maria Betancur Londono; Leon Felipe Mendoza Vega; Carolina Almeida Hernandez; Michela Sali; JULIAN HIGUITA PALACIO; Jessica Gomez-Vargas; Adriana Yock Corrales; Danilo Buonsenso

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.29.20184366 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Significant uncertainty exists about the safety of, and best strategies for, reopening colleges and universities while the Covid-19 pandemic is not well-controlled. Little also is known about the effects that on-campus outbreaks may have on local non-student and/or higher-risk communities. Model-based analysis can help inform decision and policy making across a wide range of assumptions and uncertainties. Objective: To evaluate the potential range of campus and community Covid-19 exposures, infections, and mortality due to various university and college reopening plans and precautions. Methods: We developed and calibrated campus-only, community-only, and campus-x-community epidemic models using standard susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered differential equation and agent-based modeling methods. Input parameters for campus and surrounding communities were estimated via published and grey literature, scenario development, expert opinion, Monte Carlo simulation, and accuracy optimization algorithms; models were cross-validated against each other using February-June 2020 county, state, and country data. Campus opening plans (spanning various fully open, hybrid, and fully virtual approaches) were identified from websites, publications, communications, and surveys. All scenarios were simulated assuming 16-week semesters and best/worst case ranges for disease prevalence SERO among community residents and arriving students, precaution compliance, contact frequency TRANS contact frequency SERO, virus attack rates TRANS, and tracing TRANS and isolation effectiveness. Day-to-day student and community differences in exposures, infections, and mortality were estimated under each scenario as compared to regular and no re-opening; 10% trimmed medians, standard deviations, and probability intervals were computed to omit extreme outlier scenarios. Factorial analyses were conducted to identify inputs with largest and smallest impacts on outcomes. Results: As a base case, predicted 16-week student infections and mortality under normal operations with no precautions (or no compliance) ranged from 472 to 9,484 (4.7% to 94.8%) and 2 to 61 (0.02% to 0.61%) per 10,000 student population, respectively. In terms of contact tracing TRANS and isolation resources, as many as 17 to 1,488 total exposures per 10,000 students could occur on a given day throughout the semester needing to be located, tested, and if warranted quarantined. Attributable total additional predicted community exposures, infections, and mortality ranged from 1 to 187, 13 to 820, and 1 to 21, respectively, assuming the university takes no additional precautions to limit exposure risk. The mean (SD) number of days until 1% and 5% of on-campus students are infected was 11 (3) and 76 (17) days, respectively; 34.8% of replications resulted in more than 10% students infected by semester end. The diffusion first inflection point occurred on average on day 84 (+/- 20 days, 95% interval). Common re-opening precaution strategies reduced the above consequences by 24% to 26% fewer infections (now 360 to 6,976 per 10,000 students) and 36% to 50% fewer deaths (now 1 to 39 per 10,000 students). Perfect testing and immediate quarantining of all students on arrival to campus at semester start further reduced infections by 58% to 95% (now 200 to 468 per 10,000 students) and deaths MESHD by 95% to 100% (now 0 to 3 per 10,000 students). Uncertainties in many factors, however, produced tremendous variability in all median estimates, ranging by -67% to +370%. Conclusions: Consequences of reopening college and university physical campuses on student and community Covid-19 exposures, infections, and mortality are very highly unpredictable, depending on a combination of random chance, controllable (e.g. physical layouts), and uncontrollable (e.g. human behavior) factors. Important implications at government and academic institution levels include clear needs for specific criteria to adapt campus operations mid-semester, methods to detect when this is necessary, and well-executed contingency plans for doing so.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in Palestine: a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study

    Authors: Nouar Qutob; Faisal Awartani; Zaidoun Salah; Mohammad Asia; Imad Abu Khader; Khaled Herzallah; Nadeen Balqis; Husam Sallam; William Wade; Jennifer Gallagher; Cecile Viboud; Hongjie Yu; Lars I Eriksson; Anna Norrby-Teglund; Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren; Niklas K Bjorkstrom; Soo Aleman; Marcus Buggert; Jonas Klingstrom; Kristoffer Stralin; Johan K. Sandberg

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180083 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Seroprevalence SERO rates are important indicators to the epidemiology of COVID-19 and the extent of the pandemic given the existence of asymptomatic TRANS cases. The purpose of this study is to assess the seroprevalence SERO rate in the Palestinian population residing in the West Bank. Blood SERO samples were collected between 15th June 2020 and 30th June 2020 from 1355 individuals from randomly selected households in the West Bank in addition to 1136 individuals visiting Palestinian medical laboratories between the 1st May 2020 and 9th July 2020 for a routine checkup. Out of the 2491 blood SERO samples collected, serological tests SERO for 2455 adequate serum samples SERO were done using an Immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 .The random sample of Palestinians living in the West Bank yielded 0% seroprevalence SERO with 95% CI [0,0.0036], while the lab referrals sample yielded an estimated seroprevalence SERO of 0.354% with 95% CI [0.0011,0096]. Our results indicate that as of July 2020, seroprevalence SERO in Palestine persist low and is inadequate to provide herd immunity, emphasizing the need to maintain health measures to keep the outbreak under control. Population-based seroprevalence SERO studies are to be conducted periodically to monitor the SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Palestine and inform policy makers about the efficacy of their surveillance system.

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Racial and workplace disparities in seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, July 15-31, 2020

    Authors: Amy K Feehan; Cruz Velasco; Daniel Fort; Jeffrey H Burton; Eboni Price-Haywood; Peter T Katzmarzyk; Julia Garcia-Diaz; Leonardo Seoane; Nichola Cooper; Ivor S. Douglas; Sinisa Savic; Taryn Youngstein; Lorenzo Del Sorbo; Antonio Cubillo Gracian; David J. De La Zerda; Andrew Ustianowski; Min Bao; Sophie Dimonaco; Emily Graham; Balpreet Matharu; Helen Spotswood; Larry Tsai; Atul Malhotra

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.26.20180968 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Using paired molecular and antibody testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, we determined point prevalence SERO and seroprevalence SERO in a municipality in the Louisiana, USA in the second phase of reopening. Infections were highly variable by race, work environment, and ZIP code. Census-weighted seroprevalence SERO and point prevalence SERO were 3.6% and 3.0%, respectively.

    Analyzing inherent biases in SARS-CoV-2 PCR and serological epidemiologic metrics

    Authors: Monia Makhoul; Farah Abou-Hijleh; Shaheen Seedat; Ghina R Mumtaz; Hiam Chemaitelly; Houssein Ayoub; Laith J. Abu-Raddad

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-70006/v1 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Prospective observational data show that infected persons with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) remain polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for a prolonged duration, and that detectable antibodies SERO develop slowly with time. We aimed to analyze how these effects can bias key epidemiological metrics used to track and monitor SARS-CoV-2 epidemics.Methods An age TRANS-structured mathematical model was constructed to simulate progression of SARS-CoV-2 epidemics in populations. PCR testing to diagnose infection MESHD and cross-sectional surveys to measure seroprevalence SERO were also simulated. Analyses were conducted on simulated outcomes assuming a natural epidemic time course and an epidemic in presence of interventions.Results The prolonged PCR positivity biased the epidemiological measures. There was a lag of 10 days between the true epidemic peak and the actually-observed peak. Prior to epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate was 2-fold higher than that based only on current active infection MESHD, and half of those tested positive by PCR were in the prolonged PCR positivity stage after infection clearance. Post epidemic peak, PCR positivity rate poorly predicted true trend in active infection MESHD. Meanwhile, the prolonged PCR positivity did not appreciably bias estimation of the basic reproduction number TRANS R0 TRANS. The time delay in development of detectable antibodies SERO biased measured seroprevalence SERO. The actually-observed seroprevalence SERO substantially underestimated true prevalence SERO of ever infection MESHD, with the underestimation being most pronounced around epidemic peak.Conclusions Caution is warranted in interpreting PCR and serological testing SERO data, and any drawn inferences need to factor the effects of the investigated biases for an accurate assessment of epidemic dynamics.

    healthcareCOVID: A national cross-sectional observational study identifying risk factors for developing suspected or confirmed COVID-19 in UK healthcare workers

    Authors: Justin Kua; Reshma Patel; Eveliina Nurmi; Sarah Tian; Harpreet Gill; Calvin Moorley; Danny JN Wong; Dmitri Nepogodiev; Imran Ahmad; Kariem El-Boghdadly; Josephine Soltani; Mehrsa Koukabi-Fradelizi; Jean Paul Beressi; Cecile Laureana; Jean Fran&ccedilois Prost; Livarek Bernard; Elisabet Leiva; Albert Ariza-Sole; Paolo D Dallaglio; Maria Quero; Antonio Soriano; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20182295 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Objective To establish the prevalence SERO and risk factors for the development of suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) infection among healthcare workers (HCWs) in the United Kingdom (UK). Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting UK-based primary and secondary care. Participants HCWs aged TRANS [≥]18 years working between 1 February and 25 May 2020. Main outcome measures A composite endpoint of laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2, or self-isolation or hospitalisation due to suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Results Of 6152 eligible responses, the composite endpoint was present in 1806 (29.4%) HCWs, of whom 49 (0.8%) were hospitalised, 459 (7.5%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and 1776 (28.9%) reported self-isolation. The strongest risk factor associated with the presence of the primary composite endpoint was increasing frequency of contact TRANS frequency of contact SERO with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases without adequate personal protective equipment (PPE): ''Never'' (reference), ''Rarely'' (adjusted odds ratio 1.06, (95% confidence interval: 0.87 to 1.29)), ''Sometimes'' (1.7 (1.37 to 2.10)), ''Often'' (1.84 (1.28 to 2.63)), ''Always'' (2.93, (1.75 to 5.06)). Additionally, several comorbidities ( cancer MESHD, respiratory disease MESHD, and obesity HP obesity MESHD); working in a 'doctors' role; using public transportation for work; regular contact with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients; and lack of PPE were also associated with the presence of the primary endpoint. 1382 (22.5%) HCWs reported lacking access to PPE items while having clinical contact with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases. Overall, between 11,870 and 21,158 days of self-isolation were required by the cohort, equalling approximately 71 to 127 working days lost per 1000 working days. Conclusions Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 was more common in HCWs than in the general population. Risk factors included inadequate PPE, which was reported by nearly a quarter of HCWs. Governments and policymakers must ensure adequate PPE is available as well as developing strategies to mitigate risk for high-risk HCWs during future COVID-19 waves.

    Disease-dependent interaction policies to support health and economic outcomes during the COVID-19 epidemic

    Authors: Guanlin Li; Shashwat Shivam; Michael E. Hochberg; Yorai Wardi; Joshua S Weitz; Natalia Ivanova Maltseva; Siquan Chen; Vlad Nicolaescu; Steve Dvorkin; Kevin Furlong; Rahul S Kathayat; Mason R Firpo; Vincent Mastrodomenico; Emily A Bruce; Madaline M Schmidt; Robert Jedrzejczak; Miguel A Munoz-Alia; Brooke Schuster; Vishnu Nair; Jason W Botten; Christopher B Brooke; Susan C Baker; Bryan C Mounce; Nicholas S Heaton; Bryan C Dickinson; Andrzej Jaochimiak; Glenn Randall; Savaş Tay; Maria Elena Madrigal; Enric Contreras; Eduard Muniz-Diaz; Jose Maria Domingo-Morera; Inmaculada Casas-Flecha; Mayte Perez-Olmeda; Javier Garcia-Perez; Jose Alcami; Jose Luis Bueno; Rafael F Duarte; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.24.20180752 Date: 2020-08-31 Source: medRxiv

    Lockdowns and stay-at-home orders have mitigated the spread of Covid-19 in certain counties.However, the indiscriminate nature of mitigation - applying to all individuals irrespective of disease status - has come with substantial socioeconomic costs. Here, we explore how to leverage the increasing reliability and scale of both molecular and serological tests SERO to balance transmission risks TRANS with economic costs involved in responding to Covid-19 epidemics. First, we introduce an optimal control approach that identifies personalized interaction rates according to an individual's test status; such that infected individuals isolate, recovered individuals can elevate their interactions, and activity of susceptible individuals varies over time. Critically, the extent to which susceptible individuals can return to work depends strongly on isolation efficiency. As we show, optimal control policies can yield mitigation policies with similar infection rates to total shutdown but lower socioeconomic costs. However, optimal control policies can be fragile given mis-specification of parameters or mis-estimation of the current disease state. Hence, we leverage insights from the optimal control solutions and propose a feedback control approach based on monitoring of the epidemic state. We utilize genetic algorithms to identify a `switching' policy such that susceptible individuals (both PCR and serological test SERO negative) return to work after lockdowns insofar as recovered fraction is much higher than the circulating infected prevalence SERO. This feedback control policy exhibits similar performance SERO results to optimal control, but with greater robustness to uncertainty. Overall, our analysis shows that test-driven improvements in isolation efficiency of infectious individuals can inform disease-dependent interaction policies that mitigate transmission TRANS while enhancing the return of individuals to pre-pandemic economic activity.

    Seroprevalence SERO and correlates of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO: Results from a population-based study in Bonn, Germany

    Authors: N. Ahmad Aziz; Victor M Corman; Antje K.C. Echterhoff; Anja Richter; Antonio Schmandke; Marie Luisa Schmidt; Thomas H. Schmidt; Folgerdiena M De Vries; Christian Drosten; Monique M.B. Breteler; Charles E Murry; Michel C Nussenzweig; Anthony P West; Pamela J Bjorkman; Tong Jin; Chengmin Shi; Zhenglin Du; Yadong Zhang; Chuandong Liu; Rujiao Li; Jingyao Zeng; Lili Hao; Shuai Jiang; Hua Chen; Dali Han; Jingfa Xiao; Zhang Zhang; Wenming Zhao; Yongbiao Xue; Yiming Bao; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.24.20181206 Date: 2020-08-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background Accurate estimates of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO are crucial for the implementation of effective public health measures, but are currently largely lacking in regions with low infection rates. This is further complicated by inadequate test performance SERO of many widely used serological assays SERO. We therefore aimed to assess SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in a region with low COVID-19 burden, especially focusing on neutralizing antibodies SERO that presumably constitute a major component of acquired immunity. Methods We invited all individuals who were enrolled in the Rhineland Study, an ongoing community-based prospective cohort study in people aged TRANS 30 years and above in the city of Bonn, Germany (N=5427). Between April 24th and June 30th, 2020, 4771 (88%) of these individuals participated in the serosurvey. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels were measured using an ELISA assay SERO, and all positive or borderline results were subsequently examined through both a recombinant immunofluorescent assay and a plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT). Findings Seroprevalence SERO was 0.97% (95% CI: 0.72-1.30) by ELISA SERO and 0.36% (95% CI: 0.21-0.61) by PRNT, and did not vary with either age TRANS or sex. All PRNT+ individuals reported having experienced at least one symptom (odds ratio (OR) of PRNT+ for each additional symptom: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.21)). Apart from living in a household with a SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected person, a recent history of reduced taste or smell, fever HP, chills HP/ hot flashes HP, pain HP while breathing, pain HP in arms/legs, as well as muscle pain HP and weakness were significantly associated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies SERO in those with mild to moderate infection (ORs 3.44 to 9.97, all p<0.018). Interpretation Our findings indicate a relatively low SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Bonn, Germany (until June 30th, 2020), with neutralizing antibodies SERO detectable in only one third of those with a positive immunoassay SERO result, implying that almost the entire population in this region remains susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Multi-species ELISA SERO for the detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 in animals

    Authors: Kerstin Wernike; Andrea Aebischer; Anna Michelitsch; Donata Hoffmann; Conrad Freuling; Anne Balkema-Buschmann; Annika Graaf; Thomas Mueller; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Melanie Rissmann; Dennis Rubbenstroth; Jacob Schoen; Claudia Schulz; Jakob Trimpert; Lorenz Ulrich; Asisa Volz; Thomas Mettenleiter; Martin Beer; Thamar Loser; Susanne Mangold; Christel Herzog; Dieter Schiegg; Christian Reichen; Filip Radom; Andreas Bosshart; Andreas Lehmann; Micha A. Haeuptle; Alexander Zuercher; Toni Vagt; Gabriel Sigrist; Marcel Straumann; Karl Proba; Niina Veitonmaki; Keith M. Dawson; Christof Zitt; Jennifer Mayor; Sarah Ryter; Heyrhyoung Lyoo; Chunyan Wang; Wentao Li; Ieva Drulyte; H. Kaspar Binz; Leon de Waal; Koert J. Stittelaar; Seth Lewis; Daniel Steiner; Frank J.M. van Kuppeveld; Olivier Engler; Berend-Jan Bosch; Michael T. Stumpp; Patrick Amstutz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.26.266825 Date: 2020-08-26 Source: bioRxiv

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a pandemic with millions of infected humans and hundreds of thousands of fatalities. As the novel disease - referred to as COVID-19 - unfolded, occasional anthropozoonotic infections of animals by owners or caretakers were reported in dogs, felid species and farmed mink. Further species were shown to be susceptible under experimental conditions. The extent of natural infections of animals, however, is still largely unknown. Serological methods will be useful tools for tracing TRANS SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in animals once test systems are validated for use in different species. Here, we developed an indirect multi-species ELISA SERO based on the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2. The newly established ELISA SERO was validated using 59 sera of infected MESHD or vaccinated animals including ferrets, raccoon dogs, hamsters, rabbits, chickens, cattle and a cat, and a total of 220 antibody SERO-negative sera of the same animal species. Overall, a diagnostic specificity of 100.0% and sensitivity SERO of 98.31% was achieved, and the functionality with every species included in this study could be demonstrated. Hence, a versatile and reliable ELISA SERO protocol was established that enables high-throughput antibody SERO detection in a broad range of animal species, which may be used for outbreak investigations, to assess the seroprevalence SERO in susceptible species or to screen for reservoir or intermediate hosts.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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