Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Nausea (3)

Vomiting (3)

Diarrhea (3)

Headache (3)

Fatigue (3)


Human Phenotype

Chills (4)

Headache (3)

Fatigue (3)

Fever (2)

Cough (2)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Seroprevalence SERO and correlates of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies SERO: Results from a population-based study in Bonn, Germany

    Authors: N. Ahmad Aziz; Victor M Corman; Antje K.C. Echterhoff; Anja Richter; Antonio Schmandke; Marie Luisa Schmidt; Thomas H. Schmidt; Folgerdiena M De Vries; Christian Drosten; Monique M.B. Breteler; Charles E Murry; Michel C Nussenzweig; Anthony P West; Pamela J Bjorkman; Tong Jin; Chengmin Shi; Zhenglin Du; Yadong Zhang; Chuandong Liu; Rujiao Li; Jingyao Zeng; Lili Hao; Shuai Jiang; Hua Chen; Dali Han; Jingfa Xiao; Zhang Zhang; Wenming Zhao; Yongbiao Xue; Yiming Bao; Valerie Mioulet; Joseph Newman; Amin S Asfor; Alison Burman; Sylvia Crossley; John Hammond; Elma Tchilian; Bryan Charleston; Dalan Bailey; Tobias J Tuthill; Simon Graham; Tomas Malinauskas; Jiandong Huo; Julia Tree; Karen Buttigieg; Ray Owens; Miles Carroll; Rod Daniels; John McCauley; Kuan-Ying A Huang; Mark Howarth; Alain Townsend

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.24.20181206 Date: 2020-08-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background Accurate estimates of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO are crucial for the implementation of effective public health measures, but are currently largely lacking in regions with low infection rates. This is further complicated by inadequate test performance SERO of many widely used serological assays SERO. We therefore aimed to assess SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in a region with low COVID-19 burden, especially focusing on neutralizing antibodies SERO that presumably constitute a major component of acquired immunity. Methods We invited all individuals who were enrolled in the Rhineland Study, an ongoing community-based prospective cohort study in people aged TRANS 30 years and above in the city of Bonn, Germany (N=5427). Between April 24th and June 30th, 2020, 4771 (88%) of these individuals participated in the serosurvey. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG levels were measured using an ELISA assay SERO, and all positive or borderline results were subsequently examined through both a recombinant immunofluorescent assay and a plaque reduction neutralisation test (PRNT). Findings Seroprevalence SERO was 0.97% (95% CI: 0.72-1.30) by ELISA SERO and 0.36% (95% CI: 0.21-0.61) by PRNT, and did not vary with either age TRANS or sex. All PRNT+ individuals reported having experienced at least one symptom (odds ratio (OR) of PRNT+ for each additional symptom: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.21)). Apart from living in a household with a SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected person, a recent history of reduced taste or smell, fever HP, chills HP/ hot flashes HP, pain HP while breathing, pain HP in arms/legs, as well as muscle pain HP and weakness were significantly associated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies SERO in those with mild to moderate infection (ORs 3.44 to 9.97, all p<0.018). Interpretation Our findings indicate a relatively low SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Bonn, Germany (until June 30th, 2020), with neutralizing antibodies SERO detectable in only one third of those with a positive immunoassay SERO result, implying that almost the entire population in this region remains susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Community prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 virus in England during May 2020: REACT study

    Authors: Steven Riley; Kylie E. C. Ainslie; Oliver Eales; Benjamin Jeffrey; Caroline E. Walters; Christina J Atchison; Peter J. Diggle; Deborah Ashby; Christl A. Donnelly; Graham Cooke; Wendy Barclay; Helen Ward; Graham Taylor; Ara Darzi; Paul Elliott

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.10.20150524 Date: 2020-07-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background England has experienced one of the highest rates of confirmed COVID-19 mortality in the world. SARS-CoV-2 virus has circulated in hospitals, care homes and the community since January 2020. Our current epidemiological knowledge is largely informed by clinical cases with far less understanding of community transmission TRANS. Methods The REal-time Assessment of Community Transmission TRANS (REACT) study is a nationally representative prevalence SERO survey of SARS-CoV-2 virus swab-positivity in the community in England. We recruited participants regardless of symptom status. Results We found 159 positives from 120,610 swabs giving an average prevalence SERO of 0.13% (95% CI: 0.11%,0.15%) from 1st May to 1st June 2020. We showed decreasing prevalence SERO with a halving time of 8.6 (6.2, 13.6) days, implying an overall reproduction number TRANS R of 0.57 (0.45, 0.72). Adults TRANS aged TRANS 18 to 24 yrs had the highest swab-positivity rates, while those >64 yrs had the lowest. Of the 126 participants who tested positive with known symptom status in the week prior to their swab, 39 reported symptoms while 87 did not, giving an estimate that 69% (61%,76%) of people were symptom-free for the 7 days prior testing positive in our community sample. Symptoms strongly associated with swab-positivity were: nausea and/or vomiting HP nausea and/or vomiting MESHD vomiting MESHD, diarrhoea MESHD, blocked nose, loss of smell, loss of taste MESHD, headache HP headache MESHD, chills HP and severe fatigue HP fatigue MESHD. Recent contact with a known COVID-19 case was associated with odds of 24 (16, 38) for swab-positivity. Compared with non-key workers, odds of swab-positivity were 7.7 (2.4, 25) among care home (long-term care facilities) workers and 5.2 (2.9, 9.3) among health care workers. However, some of the excess risk associated with key worker status was explained by recent contact with COVID-19 cases. We found no strong evidence for geographical variability in positive swab results. Conclusion Our results provide a reliable baseline against which the impact of subsequent relaxation of lockdown can be assessed to inform future public health efforts to control transmission TRANS.

    Symptomatology of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) - Lessons from a meta-analysis across 13 countries

    Authors: Champika Saman Kumara Gamakaranage; Dineshani Hettiarachchi; Dileepa Ediriweera; Saroj Jayasinghe

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39412/v2 Date: 2020-07-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in varying clinical manifestations and mortality rates. There is no consensus on the symptomatology that would guide researchers and clinicians. Objective: The objective was to identify symptoms and their frequencies of COVID-19 with a meta-analysis of studies from several countries. Data sources: A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar data sources and reference tracing TRANS were used to identify 7176 articles. Eligibility criteria: Suitable articles were selected manually with selection criteria and 14 original articles included in meta-analysis. Data abstraction and analysis: PRISMA guidelines, used for data abstraction and a table was generated by feeding it with numbers and proportions of each symptom described. A meta-analysis was carried out using random effect models on each symptom separately across the studies and their prevalence SERO rates and 95% confident intervals were calculated.Results: Selected 14 studies, either cross-sectional or cohort studies are analyzed. There were 2,660 confirmed cases TRANS of COVID-19. The majority were from China (n=2,439, 91.7%) and remainder from the Netherlands, Italy, Korea and India and one article from Europe. There was a total of 32 symptoms identified from the meta-analysis and additional 7 symptoms were identified from reference searching. The most common symptoms were ( prevalence SERO >50%): fever HP fever MESHD (79.56%, 95% CI: 72.17-86.09%), malaise (63.3%, 95% CI: 53.1 – 73.0%), cough HP (56.7. %, 95% CI: 48.6 - 64.6 %) and cold (55.6%, 95% CI: 45.2 – 65.7%). Symptoms of intermediate incidence (5-49%) were; anosmia HP anosmia MESHD, sneezing HP, ocular pain HP ocular pain MESHD, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, sputum production, arthralgia HP arthralgia MESHD, tachypnea HP tachypnea MESHD, palpitation HP, headache HP headache MESHD, chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD, shortness of breath MESHD, chills HP, myalgia HP myalgia MESHD, sore throat, anorexia HP anorexia MESHD, weakness MESHD, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, rhinorrhea HP rhinorrhea MESHD, dizziness MESHD, nausea HP nausea MESHD, altered level of consciousness, vomiting HP vomiting MESHD and abdominal pain HP abdominal pain MESHD. Rare symptoms (<5%): tonsil swelling MESHD, haemoptysis, conjunctival injection, lymphadenopathy HP lymphadenopathy MESHD and rash MESHD. Conclusion and implications of key findings: We found (25/32, from meta-analysis) symptoms to be present in =>5% of cases which could be considered as “typical” symptoms of COVID-19. The list of symptoms we identified is different from those documents released by the WHO, CDC, NHS, Chinese CDC, Institute Pasteur and Mayo Clinic. The compiled list would be useful for future researchers to document a comprehensive picture of the illness.  

    Symptomatology of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) - Lessons from A Meta-Analysis Across 13 Countries

    Authors: Champika Saman Kumara Gamakaranage; Dineshani Hettiarachchi; Dileepa Ediriweera; Saroj Jayasinghe

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-39412/v1 Date: 2020-07-01 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in varying clinical manifestations and mortality rates. There is no consensus on the symptomatology that would guide researchers and clinicians.Objective: The objective of the study was to identify symptoms and their frequencies of coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 with a meta-analysis of studies from several countries. Data sources: A systematic review using PubMed and Google Scholar data sources and reference tracing TRANS were used to identify 7176 relevant articles. Eligibility criteria: Suitable articles were selected manually with selection criteria and 14 original articles included for meta-analysis. Data abstraction analysis: PRISMA guideline was used for abstracting data. Then a table was generated by feeding it with numbers and proportions of each symptom described in original studies. A meta-analysis was carried out using random effect models on each symptom separately across the studies and their prevalence SERO rates and 95% confident intervals calculated.Results: We identified 14 relevant scientific papers, either cross-sectional or cohort studies and analyzed. There were 2,660 cases of COVID-19. he majority were from China (n=2,439, 91.7%) and remainder from the Netherlands, Italy, Korea and India and one article from Europe. There was a total of 32 symptoms (i.e. present in >50% of patients):  fever MESHD (79.56%, 95% CI: 72.17-86.09%), malaise (63.3%, 95% CI: 53.1 – 73.0%), cough HP (56.7. %, 95% CI: 48.6 - 64.6 %) and cold (55.6%, 95% CI: 45.2 – 65.7%). Symptoms of intermediate incidence (5-49%) were; anosmia HP anosmia MESHD, sneezing HP, ocular pain HP ocular pain MESHD, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, sputum production, arthralgia HP arthralgia MESHD, tachypnea HP tachypnea MESHD, palpitation HP, headache HP headache MESHD, chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD, shortness of breath MESHD, chills HP, myalgia HP myalgia MESHD, sore throat, anorexia HP anorexia MESHD, weakness MESHD, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD, rhinorrhea HP rhinorrhea MESHD, dizziness MESHD, nausea HP nausea MESHD, altered level of consciousness, vomiting HP vomiting MESHD and abdominal pain HP abdominal pain MESHD. Rare symptoms (<5% of patients) were: tonsil swelling, haemoptysis, conjunctival injection, lymphadenopathy HP lymphadenopathy MESHD and rash MESHD were uncommon symptoms of coronavirus disease MESHD (<5%).Conclusion and implications of key findings: We found (25/32) symptoms to be present in =>5% of cases which could be considered as “typical” symptoms of COVID-19. The list of symptoms we identified are different from those documents released by the WHO, CDC, NHS, Chinese CDC, Institute Pasteur and Mayo Clinic. The compiled list would be useful for future researchers to document a comprehensive picture of the illness.

The ZB MED preprint Viewer preVIEW includes all COVID-19 related preprints from medRxiv and bioRxiv, from ChemRxiv, from ResearchSquare, from arXiv and from Preprints.org and is updated on a daily basis (7am CET/CEST).
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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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