Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Infections (167)

Disease (110)

Death (87)

Coronavirus Infections (59)

Fever (36)


Human Phenotype

Anxiety (42)

Hypertension (37)

Fever (36)

Cough (29)

Obesity (22)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    An improved methodology for estimating the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Virag Patel; Catherine McCarthy; Rachel A Taylor; Ruth Moir; Louise A Kelly; Emma L Snary

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168187 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Since the identification of Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in China in December 2019, there have been more than 17 million cases of the disease MESHD in 216 countries worldwide. Comparisons of prevalence SERO estimates between different communities can inform policy decisions regarding safe travel TRANS between countries, help to assess when to implement (or remove) disease MESHD control measures and identify the risk of over-burdening healthcare providers. Estimating the true prevalence SERO can, however, be challenging because officially reported figures are likely to be significant underestimates of the true burden of COVID-19 within a community. Previous methods for estimating the prevalence SERO fail to incorporate differences between populations (such as younger populations having higher rates of asymptomatic TRANS cases) and so comparisons between, for example, countries, can be misleading. Here, we present an improved methodology for estimating COVID-19 prevalence SERO. We take the reported number of cases and deaths MESHD (together with population size) as raw prevalence SERO for the population. We then apply an age TRANS-adjustment to this which allows the age TRANS-distribution of that population to influence the case-fatality rate and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases. Finally, we calculate the likely underreporting factor for the population and use this to adjust our prevalence SERO estimate further. We use our method to estimate the prevalence SERO for 166 countries (or the states of the United States of America, hereafter referred to as US state) where sufficient data were available. Our estimates show that as of the 30th July 2020, the top three countries with the highest estimated prevalence SERO are Brazil (1.26%, 95% CI: 0.96 - 1.37), Kyrgyzstan (1.10%, 95% CI: 0.82 - 1.19) and Suriname (0.58%, 95% CI: 0.44 - 0.63). Brazil is predicted to have the largest proportion of all the current global cases (30.41%, 95%CI: 27.52 - 30.84), followed by the USA (14.52%, 95%CI: 14.26 - 16.34) and India (11.23%, 95%CI: 11.11 - 11.24). Amongst the US states, the highest prevalence SERO is predicted to be in Louisiana (1.07%, 95% CI: 1.02 - 1.12), Florida (0.90%, 95% CI: 0.86 - 0.94) and Mississippi (0.77%, 95% CI: 0.74 - 0.81) whereas amongst European countries, the highest prevalence SERO is predicted to be in Montenegro (0.47%, 95% CI: 0.42 - 0.50), Kosovo (0.35%, 95% CI: 0.29 - 0.37) and Moldova (0.28%, 95% CI: 0.23 - 0.30). Our results suggest that Kyrgyzstan (0.04 tests per predicted case), Brazil (0.04 tests per predicted case) and Suriname (0.29 tests per predicted case) have the highest underreporting out of the countries in the top 25 prevalence SERO. In comparison, Israel (34.19 tests per predicted case), Bahrain (19.82 per predicted case) and Palestine (9.81 tests per predicted case) have the least underreporting. The results of this study may be used to understand the risk between different geographical areas and highlight regions where the prevalence SERO of COVID-19 is increasing most rapidly. The method described is quick and easy to implement. Prevalence SERO estimates should be updated on a regular basis to allow for rapid fluctuations in disease MESHD patterns.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-Specific IgG Antibodies SERO Among Adults TRANS Living in Connecticut Between March 1 and June 1, 2020: Post- Infection MESHD Prevalence SERO (PIP) Study

    Authors: Shiwani Mahajan; Rajesh Srinivasan; Carrie A Redlich; Sara K Huston; Kelly M Anastasio; Lisa Cashman; Dan Witters; Jenny Marlar; Shu-Xia Li; Zhenqiu Lin; Domonique Hodge; Manas Chattopadhyay; Mark D Adams; Charles Lee; Lokinendi V Rao; Chris Stewart; Karthik Kuppusamy; Albert I Ko; Harlan M Krumholz

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168203 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: A seroprevalence SERO study can estimate the percentage of people with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in the general population. Most existing reports have used a convenience sample, which may bias their estimates. Objective: To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 based on a random sample of adults TRANS living in Connecticut between March 1 and June 1, 2020. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: We sought a representative sample of Connecticut residents who completed a survey between June 4 and June 23, 2020 and underwent serology testing for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO between June 10 and July 6, 2020. Participants: 505 respondents, aged TRANS [≥]18 years, residing in non-congregate settings who completed both the survey and the serology test. Main outcomes and measures: We estimated the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO among the overall population and across pre-specified subgroups. We also assessed the prevalence SERO of symptomatic illness, risk factors for virus exposure, and self-reported adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among this population. Results: Of the 505 respondents (mean age TRANS 50 [{+/-}17] years; 54% women; 76% non-Hispanic White individuals) included, 32% reported having at least 1 symptom suggestive of COVID-19 since March 1, 2020. Overall, 18 respondents had SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO, resulting in the state-level weighted seroprevalence SERO of 3.1 (90% CI 1.4-4.8). Individuals who were asymptomatic TRANS had significantly lower seroprevalence SERO (0.6% [90% CI 0.0-1.5]) compared with the overall state estimate, while those who reported having had [≥]1 and [≥]2 symptoms had a seroprevalence SERO of 8.0% (90% CI 3.1-12.9) and 13.0% (90% CI 3.5-22.5), respectively. All 9 of the respondents who reported previously having a positive coronavirus test were positive for SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies SERO. Nearly two-third of respondents reported having avoided public places (74%) and small gatherings of family or friends TRANS (75%), and 97% reported wearing a mask outside their home, at least part of the time. Conclusions and relevance: These estimates indicate that most people in Connecticut do not have detectable levels of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2. There is a need for continued adherence to risk mitigation behaviors among Connecticut residents, to prevent resurgence of COVID-19 in this region.

    Transient dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 as England exited national lockdown

    Authors: Steven Riley; Kylie E. C. Ainslie; Oliver Eales; Caroline E Walters; Haowei Wang; Christina J Atchison; Peter Diggle; Deborah Ashby; Christl A. Donnelly; Graham Cooke; Wendy Barclay; Helen Ward; Ara Darzi; Paul Elliott

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.05.20169078 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Control of the COVID-19 pandemic requires a detailed understanding of prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the population. Case-based surveillance is necessarily biased towards symptomatic individuals and sensitive to varying patterns of reporting in space and time. The real-time assessment of community transmission TRANS antigen study (REACT-1) is designed to overcome these limitations by obtaining prevalence SERO data based on a nose and throat swab RT-PCR test among a representative community-based sample in England, including asymptomatic TRANS individuals. Here, we describe results comparing rounds 1 and 2 carried out during May and mid June / early July 2020 respectively across 315 lower tier local authority areas. In round 1 we found 159 positive samples from 120,620 tested swabs while round 2 there were 123 positive samples from 159,199 tested swabs, indicating a downwards trend in prevalence SERO from 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11%, 0.15%) to 0.077% (0.065%, 0.092%), a halving time of 38 (28, 58) days, and an R of 0.89 (0.86, 0.93). The proportion of swab-positive participants who were asymptomatic TRANS at the time of sampling increased from 69% (61%, 76%) in round 1 to 81% (73%, 87%) in round 2. Although health care and care home workers were infected far more frequently than other workers in round 1, the odds were markedly reduced in round 2. Age TRANS patterns of infection MESHD changed between rounds, with a reduction by a factor of five in prevalence SERO in 18 to 24 year olds. Our data were suggestive of increased risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD in Black and Asian (mainly South Asian) ethnicities. Using regional and detailed case location data, we detected increased infection MESHD intensity in and near London. Under multiple sensitivity SERO analyses, our results were robust to the possibility of false positives. At the end of the initial lockdown in England, we found continued decline in prevalence SERO and a shift in the pattern of infection MESHD by age TRANS and occupation. Community-based sampling, including asymptomatic TRANS individuals, is necessary to fully understand the nature of ongoing transmission TRANS.

    COVID-19: Beliefs in misinformation in the Australian community

    Authors: Kristen Pickles; Erin Cvejic; Brooke Nickel; Tessa Copp; Carissa Bonner; Julie Leask; Julie Ayre; Carys Batcup; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Rachael Dodd; Jennifer MJ Isautier; Kirsten J McCaffery

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168583 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: To investigate prevalence SERO of beliefs in COVID-19 misinformation and examine whether demographic, psychosocial and cognitive factors are associated with these beliefs, and how they change over time. Study design: Prospective national longitudinal community online survey. Setting: Australian general public. Participants: Adults TRANS aged TRANS over 18 years (n=4362 baseline/Wave 1; n=1882 Wave 2; n=1369 Wave 3). Main outcome measure: COVID-19 misinformation beliefs. Results: Stronger agreement with misinformation beliefs was significantly associated with younger age TRANS, male TRANS gender TRANS, lower education, and primarily speaking a language other than English at home (all p<0.01). After controlling for these variables, misinformation beliefs were significantly associated (p<0.001) with lower digital health literacy, lower perceived threat of COVID-19, lower confidence in government, and lower trust in scientific institutions. The belief that the threat of COVID-19 is greatly exaggerated increased between Wave 1-2 (p=0.002), while belief that herd immunity benefits were being covered up decreased (p<0.001). Greatest support from a list of Australian Government identified myths was for those regarding hot temperatures killing the virus (22%) and Ibuprofen exacerbates COVID-19 (13%). Lower institutional trust and greater rejection of official government accounts were associated with greater support for COVID-19 myths after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Conclusion: These findings highlight important gaps in communication effectiveness. Stronger endorsement of misinformation was associated with male TRANS gender TRANS, younger age TRANS, lower education and language other than English spoken at home. Misinformation can undermine public health efforts. Public health authorities must urgently target groups identified in this study when countering misinformation and seek ways to enhance public trust of experts, governments, and institutions.

    An Examination of School Reopening Strategies during the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic

    Authors: Alfonso Landeros; Xiang Ji; Kenneth L. Lange; Timothy C. Stutz; Jason Xu; Mary E. Sehl; Janet S. Sinsheimer

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.05.20169086 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic led to the closure of nearly all K-12 schools in the United States of America in March 2020. Although reopening K-12 schools for in-person schooling is desirable for many reasons, officials also understand that risk reduction strategies and detection of cases must be in place to allow children TRANS to safely return to school. Furthermore, the consequences of reclosing recently reopened schools are substantial and impact teachers, parents TRANS, and ultimately the educational experience in children TRANS. Using a stratified Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Removed model, we explore the influences of reduced class density, transmission TRANS mitigation (such as the use of masks, desk shields, frequent surface cleaning, or outdoor instruction), and viral detection on cumulative prevalence SERO. Our model predicts that a combination of all three approaches will substantially reduce SARS-CoV-2 prevalence SERO. The model also shows that reduction of class density and the implementation of rapid viral testing, even with imperfect detection, have greater impact than moderate measures for transmission TRANS mitigation.

    Measurement lessons of a repeated cross-sectional household food insecurity survey during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico

    Authors: Pablo Gaitan-Rossi; Mireya Vilar-Compte; Graciela Teruel; Rafael Perez-Escamilla

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20167650 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Objective To validate the telephone modality of the Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale (ELCSA) included in three waves of a phone survey to estimate the monthly household food insecurity (HFI) prevalence SERO during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico. Design We examined the reliability and internal validity of the ELCSA scale in three repeated waves of a cross-sectional surveys with Rasch models. We estimated the monthly prevalence SERO of food insecurity in the general population and in households with and without children TRANS, and compared them with a national 2018 survey. We tested concurrent validity by testing associations of HFI with socioeconomic status and anxiety HP. Setting ENCOVID-19 is a monthly telephone cross-sectional survey collecting information on the well-being of Mexican households during the pandemic lockdown. Surveys used probabilistic samples and we used data from April (n=833), May (n=850), and June 2020 (n=1,674). Participants Mexicans 18 years or older who had a mobile telephone. Results ELCSA had adequate model fit and HFI was associated, within each wave, with more poverty and anxiety HP. The COVID-19 lockdown was associated with an important reduction in food security; decreasing stepwise from 38.9% in 2018 to 24.9% in June 2020 in households with children TRANS. Conclusions Telephone surveys are a feasible strategy to monitor food insecurity with ELCSA.

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence SERO Across a Diverse Cohort of Healthcare Workers

    Authors: Joseph Ebinger; Gregory J. Botwin; Christine M. Albert; Mona Alotaibi; Moshe Arditi; Anders H. Berg; Aleksandra Binek; Patrick G. Botting; Justyna Fert-Bober; Jane C. Figueiredo; Jonathan D. Grein; Wohaib Hasan; Mir Henglin; Shehnaz K. Hussain; Mohit Jain; Sandy Joung; Michael Karin; Elizabeth H Kim; Dalin Li; Yunxian Liu; Eric Luong; Dermot P.B. McGovern; Akil Merchant; Noah M. Merin; Peggy B. Miles; Margo Minissian; Trevor-Trung Nguyen; Koen Raedschelders; Mohamad A. Rashid; Celine E. Riera; Richard V. Riggs; Sonia Sharma; Sarah Sternbach; Nancy Sun; Warren G. Tourtellotte; Jennifer E. Van Eyk; Kimia Sobhani; Jonathan G. Braun; Susan Cheng

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20163055 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Antibody testing SERO is important for understanding patterns of exposure and potential immunity to SARS-CoV-2. Prior data on seroprevalence SERO have been subject to variations in selection of individuals and nature as well as timing of testing in relation to exposures. Objective: We sought to determine the extent of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalance and the factors associated with seroprevelance across a diverse cohort of healthcare workers. Design: Observational cohort study of healthcare workers, including SARS-CoV-2 serology testing and participant questionaires. Participants: A diverse and unselected population of adults TRANS (n=6,062) employed in a multi-site healthcare delivery system located in Los Angeles County, including individuals with direct patient contact and others with non-patient-oriented work functions. Exposure: Exposure and infection MESHD with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as determined by seropositivity. Main Outcomes: Using Bayesian and multi-variate analyses, we estimated seroprevalence SERO and factors associated with seropositivity and antibody SERO titers, including pre-existing demographic and clinical characteristics; potential Covid-19 illness related exposures; and, symptoms consistent with Covid-19 infection MESHD. Results: We observed a seroprevalence SERO rate of 4.1%, with anosmia HP as the most prominently associated self-reported symptom in addition to fever MESHD fever HP, dry cough MESHD cough HP, anorexia MESHD anorexia HP, and myalgias MESHD myalgias HP. After adjusting for potential confounders, pre-existing medical conditions were not associated with antibody SERO positivity. However, seroprevalence SERO was associated with younger age TRANS, Hispanic ethnicity, and African-American race, as well as presence of either a personal or household member having a prior diagnosis of Covid-19. Importantly, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with antibody SERO positivity even after adjusting for personal Covid-19 diagnosis status, suggesting the contribution of unmeasured structural or societally factors. Notably, number of people, or children TRANS, in the home was not associated with antibody SERO positivity. Conclusion and Relevance: The demographic factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO among our healthcare workers underscore the importance of exposure sources beyond the workplace. The size and diversity of our study population, combined with robust survey and modeling techniques, provide a vibrant picture of the demographic factors, exposures, and symptoms that can identify individuals with susceptibility as well as potential to mount an immune response to Covid-19.

    High prevalence SERO of food insecurity, the adverse impact of COVID-19 in Brazilian favela

    Authors: Catarina Vezetiv Manfrinato Jr.; Aluizio Marino; Vitoria Ferreira Conde; Maria do Carmo Pinho Franco; Elke Stedefeldt; Luciana Yuki Tomita

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166157 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: To investigate food insecurity prevalence SERO in two favelas in Brazil in the early weeks from physical distancing policy, between March 27, 2020 to June 1, 2020. Design: A cross-sectional study using online questionnaire to elicit information on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, the types of stores visited to buy food and food insecurity screening. Experience of food insecurity was collected according to the Brazilian Food Insecurity Scale. Factors associated with moderate or severe food insecurity were investigated using the logistic regression model. Setting: Sao Paulo city, Brazil. Participants: 909 householders. Results: 88% of the households included young women working as cleaners or kitchen assistants and in sales services. One-fifth of the participants were recieving federal cash transfer programme, called Bolsa Familia. There were 92% households with children TRANS. The most frequent experience reported was uncertainty about food acquisition or receiving more (89%), to eat less than one should (64%), not being able to eat healthy and nutritious food (46%), and skipping a meal (39%). 47% of the participants experienced moderate or severe food insecurity. Factors associated with moderate and severe food insecurity were low income, being Bolsa Familia recipient, a low level of education, and households without children TRANS. Conclusions: Half of the participants experienced moderate or severe food insecurity, and close to ten per cent was hungry. Our data suggest that families with children TRANS were at lower risk of moderate to severe food insecurity. It is possible that nationally established social programs like Bolsa Familia were protecting those families.

    SARS-CoV-2 Infection MESHD Among Symptom-Free Healthcare Workers

    Authors: Ryan T. Demmer; Angela Ulrich; Talia Wiggen; Ali Strickland; Brianna Naumchik; Shalini Kulasingam; Steven D. Stovitz; Clarisse Marotz; Pedro Belda-Ferre; Greg Humphrey; Peter De Hoff; Louise Laurent; Susan Kline; Rob Knight

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166066 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Current evidence suggests that transmission TRANS of severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is possible among symptom-free individuals but limited data are available on this topic in healthcare workers (HCW). The quality and acceptability of self-collected nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) is unknown. Objective: To estimate the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and to assess the acceptability of self-collected NPS among HCW. Design: Cross-sectional convenience sample enrolled between April 20th and June 24th, 2020. We had >95% power to detect at least one positive test if the true underlying prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV2 was > 1%. Setting: The metropolitan area surrounding Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Participants: HCW free of self-reported upper respiratory symptoms were recruited. Exposures: Participants completed questionnaires regarding demographics, household characteristics, personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization and comorbidities. Outcomes: A participant self-collected nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) was obtained. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD was assessed via polymerase chain reaction. NPS discomfort was assessed on a scale of 1 (no discomfort) - 10 (extreme discomfort). NPS duration and depth into the nasopharynx, and willingness to perform future self-collections were assessed. Results: Among n=489 participants 80% were female TRANS and mean age TRANS+/-SD was 41+/-11. Participants reported being physicians (14%), nurse practitioners (8%), physicians assistants (4%), nurses (51%), medics (3%), or other which predominantly included laboratory technicians and administrative roles (22%). Exposure to a known/suspected COVID-19 case in the 14 days prior to enrollment was reported in 40% of participants. SARS-CoV-2 was not detected in any participant. The mean+/-SD discomfort level of the NPS was 4.5+/-2.0. 95% of participants reported that their self-swab was longer than or equal to the duration of patient swabs they had previously performed, and 89% reported the depth to be deeper than or equal to the depth of previous patient swabs. Over 95% of participants reported a willingness to repeat a self-collected NP swab in the future. Conclusions and Relevance: The point prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD was likely very low in symptom-free Minnesota healthcare workers from April 20th and June 24th, 2020. Self-collected NP swabs are well-tolerated and a viable alternative to provider-collected swabs to preserve PPE.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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