Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Anxiety (34)

Fever (23)

Cough (20)

Hypertension (18)

Fatigue (9)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 1 - 10 records in total 160
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    COVID-19: Beliefs in misinformation in the Australian community

    Authors: Kristen Pickles; Erin Cvejic; Brooke Nickel; Tessa Copp; Carissa Bonner; Julie Leask; Julie Ayre; Carys Batcup; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Rachael Dodd; Jennifer MJ Isautier; Kirsten J McCaffery

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168583 Date: 2020-08-06 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: To investigate prevalence SERO of beliefs in COVID-19 misinformation and examine whether demographic, psychosocial and cognitive factors are associated with these beliefs, and how they change over time. Study design: Prospective national longitudinal community online survey. Setting: Australian general public. Participants: Adults TRANS aged TRANS over 18 years (n=4362 baseline/Wave 1; n=1882 Wave 2; n=1369 Wave 3). Main outcome measure: COVID-19 misinformation beliefs. Results: Stronger agreement with misinformation beliefs was significantly associated with younger age TRANS, male TRANS gender TRANS, lower education, and primarily speaking a language other than English at home (all p<0.01). After controlling for these variables, misinformation beliefs were significantly associated (p<0.001) with lower digital health literacy, lower perceived threat of COVID-19, lower confidence in government, and lower trust in scientific institutions. The belief that the threat of COVID-19 is greatly exaggerated increased between Wave 1-2 (p=0.002), while belief that herd immunity benefits were being covered up decreased (p<0.001). Greatest support from a list of Australian Government identified myths was for those regarding hot temperatures killing the virus (22%) and Ibuprofen exacerbates COVID-19 (13%). Lower institutional trust and greater rejection of official government accounts were associated with greater support for COVID-19 myths after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Conclusion: These findings highlight important gaps in communication effectiveness. Stronger endorsement of misinformation was associated with male TRANS gender TRANS, younger age TRANS, lower education and language other than English spoken at home. Misinformation can undermine public health efforts. Public health authorities must urgently target groups identified in this study when countering misinformation and seek ways to enhance public trust of experts, governments, and institutions.

    Seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State

    Authors: Hussaini Majiya; Mohammed Aliyu-Paiko; Vincent Tochukwu Balogu; Dickson Achimugu Musa; Ibrahim Maikudi Salihu; Abdullahi Abubakar Kawu; Ishaq Yakubu Bashir; Aishat Rabiu Sani; John Baba; Amina Tako Muhammad; Fatima Ladidi Jibril; Ezekiel Bala; Nuhu George Obaje; Yahaya Badeggi Aliyu; Ramatu Gogo Muhammad; Hadiza Mohammed; Usman Naji Gimba; Abduljaleel Uthman; Hadiza Muhammad Liman; Sule Alfa Alhaji; Joseph Kolo James; Muhammad Muhammad Makusidi; Mohammed Danasabe Isah; Ibrahim Abdullahi; Umar Ndagi; Bala Waziri; Chindo Ibrahim Bisallah; Naomi John Dadi-Mamud; Kolo Ibrahim; Abu Kasim Adamu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20168112 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: medRxiv

    Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic is ongoing, and to know how far the virus has spread in Niger State, Nigeria, a pilot study was carried out to determine the COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO, patterns, dynamics, and risk factors in the state. A cross sectional study design and clustered-stratified-Random sampling strategy were used. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Rapid Test SERO Kits (Colloidal gold immunochromatography lateral flow system) were used to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in the blood SERO of sampled participants across Niger State as from 26th June 2020 to 30th June 2020. The test kits were validated using the blood SERO samples of some of the NCDC confirmed positive and negative COVID-19 cases in the State. COVID-19 IgG and IgM Test results were entered into the EPIINFO questionnaire administered simultaneously with each test. EPIINFO was then used for both the descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of the data generated. The seroprevalence SERO of COVID-19 in Niger State was found to be 25.41% and 2.16% for the positive IgG and IgM respectively. Seroprevalence SERO among age groups TRANS, gender TRANS and by occupation varied widely. A seroprevalence SERO of 37.21% was recorded among health care workers in Niger State. Among age groups TRANS, COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO was found to be in order of 30-41 years (33.33%) > 42-53 years (32.42%) > 54-65 years (30%) > 66 years and above (25%) > 6-17 years (19.20%) > 18-29 years (17.65%) > 5 years and below (6.66%). A seroprevalence SERO of 27.18% was recorded for males TRANS and 23.17% for females TRANS in the state. COVID-19 asymptomatic TRANS rate in the state was found to be 46.81%. The risk analyses showed that the chances of infection MESHD are almost the same for both urban and rural dwellers in the state. However, health care workers and those that have had contact with person (s) that travelled TRANS out of Nigeria in the last six (6) months are twice ( 2 times) at risk of being infected with the virus. More than half (54.59%) of the participants in this study did not practice social distancing at any time since the pandemic started. Discussions about knowledge, practice and attitude of the participants are included. The observed Niger State COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO means that the herd immunity for COVID-19 is yet to be achieved and the population is still susceptible for more infection MESHD and transmission TRANS of the virus. If the prevalence SERO stays as reported here, the population will definitely need COVID-19 vaccines when they become available. Niger State should fully enforce the use of face/nose masks and observation of social/physical distancing in gatherings including religious gatherings in order to stop or slow the spread of the virus.

    The mental health and experiences of discrimination of LGBTQ+ people during the COVID-19 pandemic: Initial findings from the Queerantine Study

    Authors: Dylan Kneale; Laia Becares

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20167403 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: To assess mental health status and experiences of discrimination among a sample of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer people (LGBTQ+, the + including those who don't identify with any such label) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design: Cross-sectional web-based survey. Setting: Responses were collected during the COVID-19 pandemic between April 27th and July 13th. Participants: 398 LGBTQ+ respondents forming an analytical sample of 310 in the main models. Methods: We used a combined measure of gender TRANS identity or expression and sexual orientation as the main explanatory variable. We assessed mental health with the 4-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4), and with the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D-10). We measured experiences of discrimination with a battery of questions that asked respondents whether they had experienced a set of discriminatory experiences because of their LGBTQ+ identity during the coronavirus pandemic. Experiences of discrimination was considered a mediating factor and examined both as an outcome as well as an explanatory variable. Models were adjusted for a range of demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results: The prevalence SERO of depression and stress were both high, with the majority of the sample exhibiting significant depressive symptomology (69%). Around one-in-six respondents reported some form of discrimination since the start of the pandemic because they were LGBTQ+ (16.7%). In regression models, the average score for perceived stress increased by 1.44 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.517-2.354) for those who had experienced an instance of homophobic or transphobic harassment, compared to respondents who had not. Similarly, the odds of exhibiting significant depressive symptomology (CES-D-10 scores of 10 or more) increased three-fold among those who had experienced harassment based on their gender TRANS or sexuality compared to those who had not (OR: 3.251; 95% CI: 1.168-9.052). These marked associations remained after adjustment for a number of socioeconomic and demographic covariates. Cis- female TRANS respondents who identify as gay or lesbian had the lowest scores for perceived social or depressive symptoms; conversely transgender and gender TRANS diverse individuals had the highest scores. Conclusions: We found high levels of stress and depressive symptoms, particularly among younger and transgender and gender TRANS diverse respondents. These associations were partially explained by experiences of discrimination which had a large, consistent and pernicious impact on stress and mental health.

    SARS-CoV-2 Infection MESHD Among Symptom-Free Healthcare Workers

    Authors: Ryan T. Demmer; Angela Ulrich; Talia Wiggen; Ali Strickland; Brianna Naumchik; Shalini Kulasingam; Steven D. Stovitz; Clarisse Marotz; Pedro Belda-Ferre; Greg Humphrey; Peter De Hoff; Louise Laurent; Susan Kline; Rob Knight

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166066 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Current evidence suggests that transmission TRANS of severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is possible among symptom-free individuals but limited data are available on this topic in healthcare workers (HCW). The quality and acceptability of self-collected nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) is unknown. Objective: To estimate the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and to assess the acceptability of self-collected NPS among HCW. Design: Cross-sectional convenience sample enrolled between April 20th and June 24th, 2020. We had >95% power to detect at least one positive test if the true underlying prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV2 was > 1%. Setting: The metropolitan area surrounding Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Participants: HCW free of self-reported upper respiratory symptoms were recruited. Exposures: Participants completed questionnaires regarding demographics, household characteristics, personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization and comorbidities. Outcomes: A participant self-collected nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) was obtained. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD was assessed via polymerase chain reaction. NPS discomfort was assessed on a scale of 1 (no discomfort) - 10 (extreme discomfort). NPS duration and depth into the nasopharynx, and willingness to perform future self-collections were assessed. Results: Among n=489 participants 80% were female TRANS and mean age TRANS+/-SD was 41+/-11. Participants reported being physicians (14%), nurse practitioners (8%), physicians assistants (4%), nurses (51%), medics (3%), or other which predominantly included laboratory technicians and administrative roles (22%). Exposure to a known/suspected COVID-19 case in the 14 days prior to enrollment was reported in 40% of participants. SARS-CoV-2 was not detected in any participant. The mean+/-SD discomfort level of the NPS was 4.5+/-2.0. 95% of participants reported that their self-swab was longer than or equal to the duration of patient swabs they had previously performed, and 89% reported the depth to be deeper than or equal to the depth of previous patient swabs. Over 95% of participants reported a willingness to repeat a self-collected NP swab in the future. Conclusions and Relevance: The point prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD was likely very low in symptom-free Minnesota healthcare workers from April 20th and June 24th, 2020. Self-collected NP swabs are well-tolerated and a viable alternative to provider-collected swabs to preserve PPE.

    Prevalence SERO and Determinants of Mental Distress During COVID-19 Outbreak in Bangladesh: Evidence from an Online Survey

    Authors: Shilpi Rani Saha; Md. Mobarak Hossain Khan

    id:10.20944/preprints202008.0104.v1 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: preprints.org

    Background: Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic and life-threatening highly infectious disease MESHD. The people of Bangladesh are at high risk of COVID-19 and have already experienced various socio-economic, health and psychological (mental) consequences. Particularly, mental health problems are dominantly reported in the literature and should be controlled. The main objective of this epidemiological study is to assess the mental distress and identify its determinants using online-based survey. Such information is urgently needed to develop feasible strategies for Bangladesh. Methods: An online survey was conducted for this study from May 01 to May 05, 2020. A total of 240 respondents provided self-reported online responses. Respondent’s mental distress was measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12) and by the self-rated mental health (SRMH) question. Various kinds of statistical analyses ranging from simple to multivariable logistic recession were performed using SPSS 23.0. Results: About 31.3% and 48.3% of respondents were mentally distressed by GHQ-12 and SRMH question, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mental distress was significantly higher among those respondents, whose usual activity was affected by the coronavirus (OR = 6.40, 95% CI: 1.87 - 21.90, p<0.001) and whose financial stress was increased due to lockdown (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01 – 4.46, p<0.05) on GHQ-12. Female TRANS sex (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.03 – 3.75, p<0.05) and respondents with poor mental health before the outbreak (OR = 3.38, 95% CI: 1.18 – 9.72, p<0.05) were also significantly affected by mental distress on SRMH. Conclusions: At least thirty percent of the respondents were found to be mentally distressed. Some of the study findings, particularly significant determinants, should be considered while developing strategies to reduce the burden of mental distress among study respondents or similar group in Bangladesh.

    Phylogenomic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes from western India reveals unique linked mutations

    Authors: Dhiraj Paul; Kunal Jani; Janesh Kumar; Radha Chauhan; Vasudevan Seshadri; Girdhari Lal; Rajesh Karyakarte; Suvarna Joshi; Murlidhar Tambe; Sourav Sen; Santosh Karade; Kavita Bala Anand; Shelinder Pal Singh Shergill; Rajiv Mohan Gupta; Manoj Kumar Bhat; Arvind Sahu; Yogesh S Shouche

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.228460 Date: 2020-07-31 Source: bioRxiv

    India has become the third worst-hit nation by the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Here, we investigated the molecular, phylogenomic, and evolutionary dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 in western India, the most affected region of the country. A total of 90 genomes were sequenced. Four nucleotide variants, namely C241T, C3037T, C14408T (Pro4715Leu), and A23403G (Asp614Gly), located at 5UTR, Orf1a, Orf1b, and Spike protein regions of the genome, respectively, were predominant and ubiquitous (90%). Phylogenetic analysis of the genomes revealed four distinct clusters, formed owing to different variants. The major cluster (cluster 4) is distinguished by mutations C313T, C5700A, G28881A are unique patterns and observed in 45% of samples. We thus report a newly emerging pattern of linked mutations. The predominance of these linked mutations suggests that they are likely a part of the viral fitness landscape. A novel and distinct pattern of mutations in the viral strains of each of the districts was observed. The Satara district viral strains showed mutations primarily at the 3' end of the genome, while Nashik district viral strains displayed mutations at the 5' end of the genome. Characterization of Pune strains showed that a novel variant has overtaken the other strains. Examination of the frequency of three mutations i.e., C313T, C5700A, G28881A in symptomatic versus asymptomatic TRANS patients indicated an increased occurrence in symptomatic cases, which is more prominent in females TRANS. The age TRANS-wise specific pattern of mutation is observed. Mutations C18877T, G20326A, G24794T, G25563T, G26152T, and C26735T are found in more than 30% study samples in the age group TRANS of 10-25. Intriguingly, these mutations are not detected in the higher age TRANS range 61-80. These findings portray the prevalence SERO of unique linked mutations in SARS-CoV-2 in western India and their prevalence SERO in symptomatic patients. ImportanceElucidation of the SARS-CoV-2 mutational landscape within a specific geographical location, and its relationship with age TRANS and symptoms, is essential to understand its local transmission TRANS dynamics and control. Here we present the first comprehensive study on genome and mutation pattern analysis of SARS-CoV-2 from the western part of India, the worst affected region by the pandemic. Our analysis revealed three unique linked mutations, which are prevalent in most of the sequences studied. These may serve as a molecular marker to track the spread of this viral variant to different places.

    Persistent fatigue MESHD fatigue HP following SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is common and independent of severity of initial infection MESHD

    Authors: Liam Townsend; Adam H Dyer; Karen Jones; Jean Dunne; Rachel Kiersey; Fiona Gaffney; Laura O'Connor; Aoife Mooney; Deirdre Leavy; Katie Ridge; Catherine King; Fionnuala Cox; Kate O'Brien; Joanne Dowds; Jamie Sugrue; David Hopkins; Patricia Byrne; Tara Kingston; Cliona Ni Cheallaigh; Parthiban Nadarajan; Anne Marie McLaughlin; Nollaig M Bourke; Colm Bergin; Cliona O'Farrelly; Ciaran Bannan; Niall Conlon

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164293 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Fatigue MESHD Fatigue HP is a common symptom in those presenting with symptomatic COVID-19 infection MESHD. However, it is unknown if COVID-19 results in persistent fatigue MESHD fatigue HP in those recovered from acute infection MESHD. We examined the prevalence SERO of fatigue MESHD fatigue HP in individuals recovered from the acute phase of COVID-19 illness using the Chalder Fatigue MESHD Fatigue HP Score (CFQ-11). We further examined potential predictors of fatigue MESHD fatigue HP following COVID-19 infection MESHD, evaluating indicators of COVID-19 severity, markers of peripheral immune activation and circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Of 128 participants (49.5 {+/-} 15 years; 54% female TRANS), more than half reported persistent fatigue MESHD fatigue HP (52.3%; 45/128) at 10 weeks (median) after initial COVID-19 symptoms. There was no association between COVID-19 severity (need for inpatient admission, supplemental oxygen or critical care) and fatigue MESHD fatigue HP following COVID-19. Additionally, there was no association between routine laboratory markers of inflammation MESHD and cell turnover (leukocyte, neutrophil or lymphocyte counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein) or pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-6 or sCD25) and fatigue MESHD fatigue HP post COVID-19. Female TRANS gender TRANS and those with a pre-existing diagnosis of depression/ anxiety HP were over-represented in those with fatigue MESHD fatigue HP. Our findings demonstrate a significant burden of post-viral fatigue MESHD fatigue HP in individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD after the acute phase of COVID-19 illness. This study highlights the importance of assessing those recovering from COVID-19 for symptoms of severe fatigue MESHD fatigue HP, irrespective of severity of initial illness, and may identify a group worthy of further study and early intervention.

    Estimates of the rate of infection and asymptomatic MESHD asymptomatic TRANS COVID-19 disease MESHD in a population sample from SE England

    Authors: Philippa M Wells; Katie M Doores; Simon Couvreur; Rocio Martin Martinez; Jeffrey Seow; Carl Graham; Sam Acors; Neophytos Kouphou; Stuart Neil; Richard Tedder; Pedro Matos; Kate Poulton; Maria Jose Lista; Ruth Dickenson; Helin Sertkaya; Thomas Maguire; Edward Scourfield; Ruth Bowyer; Deborah Hart; Aoife O'Byrne; Kathryn Steele; Oliver Hemmings; Carolina Rosadas; Myra McClure; Joan Capedevila-Pujol; Jonathan wolf; Sebastien Ourseilin; Matthew Brown; Michael Malim; Timothy Spector; Claire Steves

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20162701 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Understanding of the true asymptomatic TRANS rate of infection MESHD of SARS-CoV-2 is currently limited, as is understanding of the population-based seroprevalence SERO after the first wave of COVID-19 within the UK. The majority of data thus far come from hospitalised patients, with little focus on general population cases, or their symptoms. Methods: We undertook enzyme linked immunosorbent assay SERO characterisation of IgM and IgG responses against SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of 431 unselected general-population participants of the TwinsUK cohort from South-East England, aged TRANS 19-86 (median age TRANS 48; 85% female TRANS). 382 participants completed prospective logging of 14 COVID-19 related symptoms via the COVID Symptom Study App, allowing consideration of serology alongside individual symptoms, and a predictive algorithm for estimated COVID-19 previously modelled on PCR positive individuals from a dataset of over 2 million. Findings: We demonstrated a seroprevalence SERO of 12% (51participants of 431). Of 48 seropositive individuals with full symptom data, nine (19%) were fully asymptomatic TRANS, and 16 (27%) were asymptomatic TRANS for core COVID-19 symptoms: fever MESHD fever HP, cough MESHD cough HP or anosmia HP. Specificity of anosmia HP for seropositivity was 95%, compared to 88% for fever MESHD fever HP cough MESHD cough HP and anosmia HP combined. 34 individuals in the cohort were predicted to be Covid-19 positive using the App algorithm, and of those, 18 (52%) were seropositive. Interpretation: Seroprevalence SERO amongst adults TRANS from London and South-East England was 12%, and 19% of seropositive individuals with prospective symptom logging were fully asymptomatic TRANS throughout the study. Anosmia HP demonstrated the highest symptom specificity for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO response. Funding: NIHR BRC, CDRF, ZOE global LTD, RST-UKRI/MRC

    Nicotine-replacement therapy, as a surrogate of smoking, and the risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 and all-cause mortality: a nationwide, observational cohort study in France

    Authors: Mahmoud Zureik; Berangere Baricault; Celementine Vabre; Laura SEMENZATO; Jerome Drouin; Francois cuenot; Laetitia penso; Philippe Herlemont; Emilie Sbidian; Alain Weill; Mathieu Molimard; Rosemary Dray-Spira; Jeremie Botton

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.28.20160630 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction Several studies have reported an unexpectedly low prevalence SERO of current smoking among hospitalized patients with Covid-19. However, these studies mostly compared observed to expected rates of smoking without direct comparison with individual controls. Objective To examine the association of nicotine-replacement therapy, as a surrogate of smoking, with hospitalization and all-cause mortality during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in France. Methods We conducted a nationwide matched exposed/unexposed cohort study using information from the French national health data system which covers the entire French population. We conducted two separate analyses, the first in individuals exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy without major smoking-related diseases MESHD (cancer, cardiovascular and/or respiratory diseases MESHD) and the second in those presenting these conditions. We included all individuals, aged TRANS between 18 and 75 years, who had been reimbursed at least one nicotine-replacement therapy between November 15, 2019, and February 15, 2020. For each exposed individual, we randomly selected, from the entire Metropolitan French population, up to two non-exposed individuals (1:2) matched for the following variables: age TRANS (same year of birth), sex, department of residence (n=96 in Metropolitan France), and complementary universal health insurance (CMU-C). The three end points were a hospitalization with Covid-19, a death MESHD or an intubation in hospitalized patients with Covid-19, and all-cause mortality. We compared outcomes in individuals who were exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy with those in individuals who were not, using a multivariable Cox model with inverse probability weighting according to the propensity score. Results In the first analysis, 297,070 individuals without major smoking-related diseases MESHD exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy were matched with 558,228 unexposed individuals without major smoking-related diseases MESHD. Individuals were aged TRANS on average 45.6 years (standard deviation: 12.7) and 48.8% were male TRANS. From February 15, 2020 to June 7, 2020, hospitalization with Covid-19 occurred in 647 patients (151 patients in the nicotine-replacement therapy group and 496 patients in the unexposed group). In the main multivariable analysis, nicotine-replacement therapy was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 compared with unexposed individuals (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.61). Nicotine-replacement therapy exposure was also associated with a decreased risk of intubation or death MESHD in hospitalized individuals with Covid-19 (13 vs. 73 patients, hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.57) but with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (251 vs. 231 deaths MESHD, hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.80). In the second analysis, 128,768 individuals with major smoking-related diseases MESHD exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy were matched with 243,793 unexposed individuals. Individuals were aged TRANS on average 55.3 years (standard deviation: 11.4) and 53.3% were male TRANS. In the main multivariable analysis, nicotine-replacement therapy exposure was neither associated with risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 (240 patients in the nicotine-replacement therapy group and 398 patients in the unexposed group, hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.38) nor with risk of death MESHD or an intubation in hospitalized individuals with Covid-19 (48 vs. 61 patients, hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.54). All-cause mortality was higher in the nicotine-replacement therapy group (1040 vs. 366 deaths MESHD, hazard ratio, 3.83; 95% CI, 3.41 to 4.31). Conclusions This large-scale observational study suggests that smoking, measured by exposure to nicotine-replacement therapy, was associated with an increased risk of overall mortality during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in France, although it was associated with a lower risk of severe Covid-19 in individuals without major related-smoking diseases MESHD. Experimental and clinical studies are needed to disentangle the potential mechanisms of nicotine and/or smoking in Covid-19 risk. Whatever the nature of these associations, the global impact of smoking is harmful for health even over a short epidemic period.

    Serial population based serosurvey of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in a low and high transmission TRANS area of Karachi, Pakistan

    Authors: Muhammad Imran Nisar; Nadia Ansari; Mashal Amin; Farah Khalid; Aneeta Hotwani; Najeeb Rehman; Arjumand Rizvi; Arslan Memon; Zahoor Ahmed; Ashfaque Ahmed; Junaid Iqbal; Ali Faisal Saleem; Uzma Bashir Aamir; Daniel B Larremore; Bailey Fosdick; Fyezah Jehan

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.28.20163451 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background Pakistan is among the first low- and middle-income countries affected by COVID-19 pandemic. Monitoring progress through serial sero-surveys SERO, particularly at household level, in densely populated urban communities can provide insights in areas where testing is non-uniform. Methods Two serial cross-sectional household surveys were performed in April (phase 1) and June (phase 2) 2020 each in a low- (District Malir) and high- transmission TRANS (District East) area of Karachi, Pakistan. Household were selected using simple random sampling (Malir) and systematic random sampling (East). Individual participation rate from consented households was 82.3% (1000/1215 eligible) in phase 1 and 76.5% (1004/1312 eligible) in phase 2. All household members or their legal guardians answered questions related to symptoms of Covid-19 and provided blood SERO for testing with commercial Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoassay SERO targeting combined IgG and IgM. Seroprevalence SERO estimates were computed for each area and time point independently. Given correlation among household seropositivity values, a Bayesian regression model accounting for household membership, age TRANS and gender TRANS was used to estimate seroprevalence SERO. These estimates by age TRANS and gender TRANS were then post-stratified to adjust for the demographic makeup of the respective district. The household conditional risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD was estimated for each district and its confidence interval were obtained using a non-parametric bootstrap of households. Findings Post-stratified seroprevalence SERO was estimated to be 0.2% (95% CI 0-0.7) in low-and 0.4% (95% CI 0 - 1.3) in high- transmission TRANS areas in phase 1 and 8.7% (95% CI 5.1-13.1) in low- and 15.1% (95% CI 9.4 -21.7) in high- transmission TRANS areas in phase 2, with no consistent patterns between prevalence SERO rates for males TRANS and females TRANS. Conditional risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD estimates (possible only for phase 2) were 0.31 (95% CI 0.16-0.47) in low- and 0.41(95% CI 0.28-0.52) in high- transmission TRANS areas. Of the 166 participants who tested positive, only 9(5.4%) gave a history of any symptoms. Interpretation A large increase in seroprevalence SERO to SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is seen, even in areas where transmission TRANS is reported to be low. Mostly the population is still seronegative. A large majority of seropositives do not report any symptoms. The probability that an individual in a household is infected, given that another household member is infected is high in both the areas. These results emphasise the need to enhance surveillance activities of COVID-19 especially in low- transmission TRANS sites and provide insights to risks of household transmission TRANS in tightly knit neighbourhoods in urban LMIC settings.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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