Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 11 - 20 records in total 177
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    Prevalence SERO and Risk Factors of Thrombotic MESHD Events on Patients with COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis MESHD

    Authors: Xiaoming Xiong; Jianhua Chi; Qinglei Gao

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-80187/v1 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: ResearchSquare

    BackgroundCoagulation abnormalities in COVID-19 patients accompanied with poor prognosis.This study aimed to determine the prevalence SERO and risk factors of thrombotic MESHD events on COVID-19 patients.MethodsWe systematically reviewed all the studies about thrombotic MESHD events on COVID-19 patients in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, MedRxiv, bioRxiv, from Dec 1st, 2019 to July 5, 2020. The weighted mean difference (MD) or odds ratio (OR) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for clinical data in COVID-19 patients with or without thrombotic MESHD events was calculated. Results12 articles contained 1083 patients were included for meta-analysis. The prevalence SERO of thrombosis MESHD was 22% (95% CI 0.08-0.40) in COVID-19 patients and increased to 43% (95% CI 0.29-0.65) after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Compared with non-thrombotic MESHD patients, thrombotic MESHD patients had higher levels of D-dimer (MD=2.79, 95% CI 2.27–3.31), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (MD=112.71, 95% CI 62.40–163.02), and white blood SERO cells (WBC) (MD=1.14, 95% CI 0.47–1.81) while decreased lymphocytes (MD= -0.20, 95% CI -0.38 – -0.02). Age TRANS, platelet counts, and male TRANS sex tended to be risks while diabetes MESHD tended to be a protection for thrombosis MESHD for COVID-19 patients, although no statistical difference was achieved. Finally, patients with thrombosis MESHD were at a higher risk of death MESHD (OR=2.39, 95% CI 1.36–4.20).ConclusionsPrevalence of thrombosis MESHD in COVID-19 patients was high, especially in ICU, though pharmacologic thromboembolism HP thromboembolism MESHD prophylaxis was applied. Therefore, higher levels of D-dimer, LDH, WBC, and decreased lymphocytes needed to be paid close attention to in patients with COVID-19.

    Limited specificity of commercially available SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISAs SERO in serum samples SERO of African origin

    Authors: Petra Emmerich; Carolin Murawski; Ronald von Possel; Lisa Oestereich; Sophie Duraffour; Meike Pahlmann; Nicole S Struck; Daniel Eibach; Ralf Krumkamp; John Amuasi; Oumou Maiga-Ascofare; Raphael Rakotozandrindrainy; Danny Asogun; Yemisi Ighodalo; Juergen May; Egbert Tannich; Christina Deschermeier

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.15.20159749 Date: 2020-09-18 Source: medRxiv

    Specific serological tests SERO are mandatory for reliable SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO studies but assay specificity may vary considerably between populations due to interference of immune responses to other pathogens. Here, we assess the false positive rates obtained with four commercially available IgG ELISAs SERO in serum SERO panels originating from three different African countries.

    Impact of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO at delivery in women, partners and newborns

    Authors: Pia Egerup; Line Fich Olsen; Ann-Marie Hellerung Christiansen; David Westergaard; Elin Rosenbek Severinsen; Kathrine Vauvert Roemmelmayer Hviid; Astrid Marie Kolte; Amalie Dyhrberg Boje; Marie-Louise Mathilde Friis Bertelsen; Lisbeth Praetorius; Anne Zedeler; Josefine Reinhardt Nielsen; Didi Bang; Sine Berntsen; Jeppe Ethelberg-Findsen; Ditte Marie Storm; Judith Bello-Rodriguez; Andreas Ingham; Joaquim Olle-Lopez; Eva Hoffmann; Charlotte Wilken-Jensen; Lone Krebs; Finn Stener Joergensen; Henrik Torkil Westh; Henrik Lovendahl Jorgensen; Nina la Cour Freiesleben; Henriette Svarre Nielsen

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.14.20191106 Date: 2020-09-15 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Only few studies have focused on serological testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2 in pregnant women and no previous study has investigated the frequency in partners. The aim was to investigate the frequency and impact of SARS-CoV-2 in parturient women, their partners and newborns. Methods: From April 4th to July 3rd, 2020, all parturient women, their partners and newborns were invited to participate in the study. Participating women and partners had a pharyngeal swab and a blood SERO sample taken at admission and immediately after delivery a blood SERO sample was drawn from the umbilical cord. The swabs were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by PCR and the blood SERO samples were analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Full medical history, obstetric- and neonatal information were available. Results: A total of 1,361 parturient women, 1,236 partners and 1,342 newborns participated in the study. No associations between previous COVID-19 disease and obstetric- or neonatal complications were found. The adjusted serological prevalence SERO was 2.9% in women and 3.8% in partners. The frequency of blood SERO type A was significantly higher in women with antibodies SERO compared to women without antibodies SERO. 17 newborns had SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO, and none had IgM antibodies SERO. Full serological data from 1,052 families showed an absolute risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS of 0.37 if the partner had antibodies SERO. Only 55% of individuals with antibodies SERO reported symptoms. Conclusion: This large prospective cohort study reports no association between COVID-19 and obstetric- or neonatal complications. The family pattern showed a substantial increase in absolute risk for women living with a partner with antibodies SERO.

    Immunologically distinct responses occur in the CNS of COVID-19 patients

    Authors: Eric Song; Ryan D Chow; Roy Jiang; Colin R Zamecnik; Rita Loudermilk; Yile Dai; Feimei Liu; Bertie Geng; Jennifer Chiarella; Benjamin Israelow; Arnau Casanovas-Massana; Albert Ko; Aaron Ring; Steven Kleinstein; Serena Spudich; Michael Wilson; Akiko Iwasaki; Shelli F Farhadian

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.293464 Date: 2020-09-12 Source: bioRxiv

    A subset of patients with COVID-19 display neurologic symptoms but it remains unknown whether SARS-CoV-2 damages MESHD the central nervous system (CNS) directly through neuroinvasion, or if neurological symptoms MESHD are due to secondary mechanisms, including immune-mediated effects. Here, we examined the immune milieu in the CNS through the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in circulation through analysis of peripheral blood SERO mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms MESHD. Single cell sequencing with paired repertoire sequencing of PBMCs and CSF cells show evidence for unique immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in the CNS. Strikingly, anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO are present in the CSF of all patients studied, but the antibody SERO epitope specificity in the CSF and relative prevalence SERO of B cell receptor sequences markedly differed when compared to those found in paired serum SERO. Finally, using a mouse model of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, we demonstrate that localized CNS immune responses occur following viral neuroinvasion, and that the CSF is a faithful surrogate for responses occurring uniquely in the CNS. These results illuminate CNS compartment-specific immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, forming the basis for informed treatment of neurological symptoms MESHD associated with COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Prevalence SERO and Association with Routine Laboratory Values in a Life Insurance Applicant Population

    Authors: Steven J. Rigatti; Robert Stout; Ruth E Mitchell; Michael V Holmes; George Davey Smith; Dominik Schulz; Ulrich Mayr; Jochen Schneider; Christoph Spinner; Fabian Geisler; Roland M. Schmid; Tobias Lahmer; Wolfgang Huber; Xiushan Yin; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191296 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Objectives: The prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in the general population is largely unknown. Since many infections MESHD, even among the elderly TRANS and other vulnerable populations, are asymptomatic TRANS, the prevalence SERO of antibodies SERO could help determine how far along the path to herd immunity the general population has progressed. Also, in order to clarify the clinical manifestations of current or recent past COVID-19 illness, it may be useful to determine if there are any common alterations in routine clinical laboratory values. Methods: We performed SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests on 50,130 consecutive life insurance applicants who were having blood SERO drawn for the purpose of underwriting (life risk assessment). Subjects were also tested for lipids, liver function tests, renal function studies, as well as serum SERO proteins. Other variables included height, weight, blood SERO pressure at the time of the blood SERO draw, and history of common chronic diseases MESHD ( hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, heart disease MESHD, diabetes MESHD, and cancer MESHD). Results: The overall prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 was 3.0%, and was fairly consistent across the age TRANS range and similar in males TRANS and females TRANS. Several of the routine laboratory tests obtained were significantly different in antibody SERO-positive vs. antibody SERO-negative subjects, including albumin, globulins, bilirubin, and the urine albumin:creatinine ratio. The BMI was also significantly higher in the antibody SERO-positive group. Geographical distribution revealed a very high level of positivity in the state of New York compared to all other areas (17.1%). Using state population data from the US Census, it is estimated that this level of seropositivity would correspond to 6.98 million (99% CI: 6.56-7.38 million) SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD in the US, which is 3.8 times the cumulative number of cases in the US reported to the CDC as of June 1, 2020. Conclusions: The estimated number of total SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD based on positive serology is substantially higher than the total number of cases reported to the CDC. Certain laboratory values, particularly serum SERO protein levels, are associated with positive serology, though these associations are not likely to be clinically meaningful.

    Retrospective study of COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors at the onset of the outbreak before implementation of strict lockdown measures in France

    Authors: Nicolas Germain; Stephanie Herwegh; Anne Sophie Hatzfeld; Laurence Bocket; Brigitte Prevost; Pierre Marie Danze; Philippe Marchetti; Rachael Dodd; Brooke Nickel; Kristen Pickles; Samuel Cornell; Thomas Dakin; Kirsten J McCaffery; Aboubacar Sidiki Magassouba; Arsen Arakelyan; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.11.20192518 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has altered organ and tissue donations as well as transplantation practices. SARS-CoV-2 serological tests SERO could help in the selection of donors. We assessed COVID-19 seroprevalence SERO in a population of tissue donors, at the onset of the outbreak in France, before systematic screening of donors for SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Methods: 235 tissue donors at the Lille Tissue bank between November 1, 2019 and March 16, 2020 were included. Archived serum SERO samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO using two FDA-approved kits. Results: Most donors were at higher risks for severe COVID-19 illness including age TRANS over 65 years (142/235) and/or presence of co-morbidities (141/235). According to the COVID-19 risk assessment of transmission TRANS, 183 out of 235 tissue donors presented with a low risk level and 52 donors with an intermediate risk level of donor derived infection MESHD. Four out of the 235 (1.7%) tested specimens were positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO: 2 donors with anti-N protein IgG and 2 other donors with anti-S protein total Ig. None of them had both type of antibodies SERO. Conclusion: Regarding the seroprevalence SERO among tissue donors, we concluded that the transmission TRANS probability to recipient via tissue products was very low at the beginning of the outbreak.

    Development, clinical translation, and utility of a COVID-19 antibody test SERO with qualitative and quantitative readouts

    Authors: Robert H. Bortz III; Catalina Florez; Ethan Laudermilch; Ariel S Wirchnianski; Gorka Lasso; Ryan J Malonis; George I Georgiev; Olivia Vergnolle; Natalia G Herrera; Nicholas C Morano; Sean T Campbell; Erika P. Orner; Amanda Mengotto; M Eugenia Dieterle; Jens Maximilian Fels; Denise Haslwanter; Rohit Jangra; Alev Celikgil; Duncan Kimmel; James H Lee; Margarette Mariano; Antonio Nakouzi; Jose Quiroz; Johanna Rivera; Wendy A Szymczak; Karen Tong; Jason Barnhill; Mattias NE Forsell; Clas Ahlm; Daniel T. Stein; Liise-anne Pirofski; Doctor Y Goldstein; Scott J. Garforth; Steven C. Almo; Johanna P. Daily; Michael B. Prystowsky; James D. Faix; Amy S. Fox; Louis M. Weiss; Jonathan R. Lai; Kartik Chandran

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.10.20192187 Date: 2020-09-11 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) continues to place an immense burden on societies and healthcare systems. A key component of COVID-19 control efforts is serologic testing SERO to determine the community prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 exposure and quantify individual immune responses to prior infection MESHD or vaccination. Here, we describe a laboratory-developed antibody test SERO that uses readily available research-grade reagents to detect SARS-CoV-2 exposure in patient blood SERO samples with high sensitivity SERO and specificity. We further show that this test affords the estimation of viral spike-specific IgG titers from a single sample measurement, thereby providing a simple and scalable method to measure the strength of an individual's immune response. The accuracy, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of this test makes it an excellent option for clinical deployment in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    Blood SERO Type Distribution in Autoimmune Diseases MESHD: An Anonymous, Large-Scale, Self-Report Pilot Study

    Authors: Edward S Harris; Harlan D Harris; Miroslav Malkovsky

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-75388/v1 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Recent research has verified that blood SERO group or Rh factor can influence susceptibility to various cardiovascular, neoplastic and infectious diseases MESHD including COVID-19. While a number of studies have looked at correlations between blood SERO group and various rheumatological diseases MESHD, findings have been inconsistent, often because many of these studies suffered from small sample size issues. In order to better understand the potential relationships between blood SERO group/Rh factor and rheumatological diseases MESHD, we performed a large-scale self-report pilot study of blood SERO type distributions in five autoimmune diseases MESHD.Methods: Five autoimmune diseases MESHD were included in the study: systemic sclerosis MESHD, systemic lupus erythematosus HP systemic lupus erythematosus MESHD, rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD, psoriasis MESHD, and ankylosing spondylitis MESHD. We also included a control group in which participants did not have any autoimmune diseases MESHD.  The participants were recruited through social media and organizations such as the Lupus Foundation and the National Psoriasis Foundation. Respondents who met the inclusion criteria were asked only two questions by anonymous survey: blood SERO type and country of birth.Results: Each autoimmune disorder MESHD group included between 570 and 951 US participants. While there was little difference in blood SERO type distribution patterns among the five diseases, unexpectedly, all five disease groups showed a consistent pattern where Rh negative was almost twice as high as US population norms. A post-hoc non-autoimmune control group was added in order to determine if this anomalous finding was an artifact of the study design. The control group displayed a similar unexpected increase in the Rh-negative blood SERO type prevalence SERO, suggesting that the very high Rh-negative frequency among the tested disease groups was likely to be an artifact of the study design. Conclusions: Overall, our preliminary study results show no meaningful differences between the disease groups and the post-hoc control group, suggesting that neither ABO type nor Rh factor affects susceptibility to the development of any of the five studied autoimmune diseases MESHD. Nevertheless, the unexpected observed difference in Rh factor distribution between the studied groups/control group and the corresponding US population norms has important implications for any research study using self-selected subjects.  Our results suggest that such studies may be subject to unanticipated biases, requiring meticulous controls to confirm impartiality and exclude any artifacts of the study design.

    Robust SARS-COV-2 serological population screens via multi-antigen rules-based approach

    Authors: Christos F Fotis; Nikolaos Meimetis; Nikos Tsolakos; Marianna Politou; Karolina Akinosoglou; Vicky Pliaka; Angeliki Minia; Evangelos Terpos; Ioannis P. Trougakos; Andreas Mentis; Markos Marangos; George Panayiotakopoulos; Meletios A. Dimopoulos; Charalampos Gogos; Alexandros Spyridonidis; Leonidas G. Alexopoulos

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.09.20191122 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: medRxiv

    More than 300 SARS-COV-2 serological tests SERO have recently been developed using either the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), the spike glycoprotein subunit (S1), and more recently the receptor binding domain (RBD). Most of the assays report very good clinical performance SERO characteristics in well-controlled clinical settings. However, there is a growing belief that good performance SERO characteristics that are obtained during clinical performance SERO trials might not be sufficient to deliver good diagnostic results in population-wide screens that are usually characterized with low seroprevalence SERO. In this paper, we developed a serological assay SERO against N, S1 and RBD using a bead-based multiplex platform and a rules-based computational approach to assess the performance SERO of single and multi-antigen readouts in well-defined clinical samples and in a population-wide serosurvey from blood SERO donors. Even though assays based on single antigen readouts performed similarly well in the clinical samples, there was a striking difference between the antigens on the population-wide screen. Asymptomatic TRANS individuals with low antibody SERO titers and sub-optimal assay specificity might contribute to the large discrepancies in population studies with low seroprevalence SERO. A multi-antigen assay requiring partial agreement between RBD, N and S1 readouts exhibited enhanced specificity, less dependency on assay cut-off values and an overall more robust performance SERO in both sample settings. Our data suggest that assays based on multiple antigen readouts combined with a rules-based computational consensus can provide a more robust platform for routine antibody SERO screening.

    Seroprevalence SERO of the SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in health workers of the Sanitary Region VIII, at province of Buenos Aires

    Authors: Andrea Silva; Maria Fernanda Aguirre; Christian Ballejo; Maria Jimena Marro; ANDREA GAMARNIK; Gaston Vargas; Marina Pifano; Teresa Varela; Enio Garcia; Alicia Lawrynowicz; Osvaldo Uez; Irene Pagano; Anastasija Caica; Mikus Gavars; Dmitrijs Perminovs; Jelena Storozenko; Oksana Savicka; Elina Dimina; Uga Dumpis; Janis Klovins

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.07.20189050 Date: 2020-09-09 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of the SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in health workers of the Sanitary Region VIII, at province of Buenos Aires during June 2020. Methods: a cross-sectional design was used. A probabilistic sampling by two-stage conglomerates was carried out. Data were collected from a self-administered questionnaire and a blood SERO sample for antibody SERO identification. The COVIDAR IgG and IgM test were used. RESULTS: 738 health workers were included; the overall response rate was 73.80%. 71.83% of that were women; age TRANS showed a normal distribution. Nurses and doctors accounted for more than half of the staff. 75.86% of people claimed to always use Personal Protective Equipment. 5.61% of people had close contact TRANS with a confirmed case TRANS of COVID-19. 4.60% of people had previously had a nasopharyngeal swab with a negative result. Five workers had positive IgG for SARS-CoV-2 (four women and one man) with negative IgM. The mean age TRANS of the cases was 35 years old; two of them were asymptomatic TRANS; neither of them had a swab sample taken. The overall seroprevalence SERO was 0.75%, with no significant differences between strata. Discussion: the seroprevalence SERO found was low; indicating a large proportion of workers was susceptible to infection. We stress the need to complement passive epidemiological surveillance strategies with serological monitoring in health workers.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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