Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 21 - 30 records in total 176
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    24 People, one test: Boosting test efficiency using pooled serum SERO antibody testing SERO for SARS-CoV-2

    Authors: Stefan Nessler; Jonas Franz; Franziska van der Meer; Konstantina Kolotourou; Vivek Venkataramani; Chalid Hasan; Beatrix Beatrix Pollok-Kopp; Andreas E Zautner; Christine Stadelmann; Michael Weig; Stefan Poehlmann; Markus Hoffmann; Joachim Riggert; Graham Medley; Michael Hohle; John Edmunds; Chris Fitzsimmons; Tim Harris; Fiona Lecky; Andrew Lee; Ian Maconochie; Darren Walter; Dilek Telci; Fikrettin Sahin; Koray Yalcin; Ercument Ovali

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.01.20186130 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The global pandemic of COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD), with different prevalence SERO rates across countries and regions. Dynamic testing strategies are mandatory to establish efficient mitigation strategies against the disease; to be cost effective, they should adapt to regional prevalences SERO. Seroprevalence SERO surveys that detect individuals who have mounted an immune response against COVID-19 will help to determine the total number of infections within a community and improve the epidemiological calculations of attack and case fatality rates of the virus. They will also inform about the percentage of a population that might be immune against re-infections. Methods: We developed a sensitive and specific cell-based assay to detect conformational SARS-CoV-2 spike MESHD (SARS-2-S) S1 antibodies SERO in human serum SERO, and have cross-evaluated this assay against two FDA-approved SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO assays. We performed pseudovirus neutralization assays to determine whether sera that were rated antibody SERO-positive in our assay were able to specifically neutralize SARS-2-S. We pooled up to 24 sera and assessed the group testing performance SERO of our cell-based assay. Group testing was further optimized by Monte Carlo like simulations and prospectively evaluated. Findings: Highly significant correlations could be established between our cell-based assay and commercial antibody tests SERO for SARS-CoV-2. SARS-2-S S1 antibody SERO-positive sera neutralized SARS-2-S but not SARS-S MESHD, and were sensitively and specifically detected in pools of 24 samples. Monte Carlo like simulations demonstrated that a simple two-step pooling scheme with fixed pool sizes performed at least equally as well as Dorfman's optimal testing across a wide range of antibody SERO prevalences SERO. Interpretation: We demonstrate that a cell-based assay for SARS-2-S S1 antibodies SERO qualifies for group testing of neutralizing anti-SARS-2-S antibodies SERO. The assay can be combined with an easily implemented algorithm which greatly expands the screening capacity to detect anti-SARS-2-S antibodies SERO across a wide range of antibody SERO prevalences SERO. It will thus improve population serological testing SERO in many countries.

    SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO seroprevalence SERO and stability in a tertiary care hospital-setting

    Authors: Samreen Siddiqui; Salwa Naushin; Shalini Pradhan; Archa Misra; Akansha Tyagi; Menka Loomba; Swati Waghdhare; Rajesh Pandey; Shantanu Sengupta; Sujeet Jha; Edward Burn; Paula Casajust; Dalia Dawoud; Scott L DuVall; Thomas Falconer; Sergio Fernandez-Bertolin; Asieh Golozar; Mengchun Gong; Lana Yin Hui Lai; Jennifer C.E Lane; Kristine E Lynch; Michael E Matheny; Paras P Mehta; Daniel R Morales; Karthik Natarjan; Fredrik Nyberg; Jose D Posada; Christian G Reich; Lisa M Schilling; Karishma Shah; Nigham H Shah; Vignesh Subbian; Lin Zhang; Hong Zhu; Patrick Ryan; Daniel Prieto-Alhambra; Kristin Kostka; Talita Duarte-Salles

    doi:10.1101/2020.09.02.20186486 Date: 2020-09-03 Source: medRxiv

    Background: SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD has caused 64,469 deaths in India, with 7, 81, 975 active cases till 30th August 2020, lifting it to 3rd rank globally. To estimate the burden of the disease with time it is important to undertake a longitudinal seroprevalence SERO study which will also help to understand the stability of anti SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Various studies have been conducted worldwide to assess the antibody SERO stability. However, there is very limited data available from India. Healthcare workers (HCW) are the frontline workforce and more exposed to the COVID-19 infection (SARS-CoV-2) compared to the community. This study was conceptualized with an aim to estimate the seroprevalence SERO in hospital and general population and determine the stability of anti SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in HCW. Methods: Staff of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi and individuals visiting that hospital were recruited between April to August 2020. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO sample, demographic, clinical, COVID-19 symptoms, and RT-PCR data was collected from all participants. Serological testing SERO was performed using the electro-chemiluminescence based assay developed by Roche Diagnostics, in Cobas Elecsys 411. Seropositive participants were followed- upto 83 days to check for the presence of antibodies SERO. Results: A total of 780 participants were included in this study, which comprised 448 HCW and 332 individuals from the general population. Among the HCW, seroprevalence SERO rates increased from 2.3% in April to 50.6% in July. The cumulative prevalence SERO was 16.5% in HCW and 23.5% (78/332) in the general population with a large number of asymptomatic TRANS individuals. Out of 74 seropositive HCWs, 51 were followed-up for the duration of this study. We observed that in all seropositive cases the antibodies SERO were sustained even up to 83 days. Conclusion: The cumulative prevalence SERO of seropositivity was lower in HCWs than the general population. There were a large number of asymptomatic TRANS cases and the antibodies SERO developed persisted through the duration of the study. More such longitudinal serology studies are needed to better understand the antibody SERO response kinetics.

    First snap-shot meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence SERO of serum SERO antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in humans

    Authors: Ali Rostami; Mahdi Sepidarkish; Mariska Leeflang; Seyed Mohammad Riahi; Malihe Nourollahpour Shiadeh; Sahar Esfandyari; Ali H Mokdad; Peter J. Hotez; Robin B. Gasser; Parveen Bahel; Kent Owusu; Yu Yamamoto; Tanima Arora; Deepak S. Atri; Amisha Patel; Rana Gbyli; Jennifer Kwan; Christine H. Won; Charles Dela Cruz; Christina Price; Jonathan Koff; Brett A. King; Henry M. Rinder; F. Perry Wilson; John Hwa; Stephanie Halene; William Damsky; David van Dijk; Alfred Ian Lee; Hyung Chun; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20185017 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Background: COVID-19 is arguably the number-one public health concern worldwide, and efforts are now escalating to control its spread. Objective: In this study, we undertake a meta-analysis to estimate the global and regional anti-SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO rates in humans and assess whether seroprevalence SERO associates with geographical, climatic and socio-demographic factors. Data sources: We systematically reviewed PubMed, Scopus, Embase, medRxiv and bioRxiv for peer-reviewed articles or preprints (up to 14 August 2020). Study eligibility criteria: Population-based studies describing prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 serum SERO antibodies SERO in general people. Participants: general people who were tested for prevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 serum SERO antibodies SERO. Interventions: There were no interventions. Methods: We used random-effects model to estimate pooled seroprevalence SERO, and then extrapolated these findings to the global population (for 2020). Sub-group and meta-regression analyses explored potential sources of heterogeneity in the data and relationships between seroprevalence SERO and socio-demographic, geographical and climatic factors. Results: In total, 47 serological studies involving 399,265 people from 23 countries met the inclusion criteria. The pooled seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in general people was estimated at 3.38% (95% CI, 3.05%-3.72%; 15,879/399,265). On a regional basis, we determined seroprevalence SERO estimates of 5.27% (3.97-6.57%) in Northern Europe; 4.41% (2.20-6.61%) in Southern Europe; 4.41% (3.03-5.79%) in North America; 3.17% (1.96-4.38%) in Western Europe; 2.02% (1.56-2.49%) in the Eastern Asia; and 1.45% (0.95-1.94%) in South America. Extrapolating to the 2020 world population, we estimated that 263,565,606 individuals had been exposed or infected with SARS-CoV-2 at the first wave of the pandemic. A significantly higher seroprevalence SERO was related to higher income levels and human development indices, higher geographical latitudes and lower mean environmental temperatures. Interpretation This study reinforces that SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is a very rapidly-spreading communicable disease and calls for routine surveys to constantly monitor temporal changes in seroprevalence SERO around the globe.

    Seroprevalence SERO and immunity of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents in schools in Switzerland: design for a longitudinal, school-based prospective cohort study

    Authors: Agne Ulyte; Thomas Radtke; Irene Abela; Sarah H Haile; Julia Braun; Ruedi Jung; Christoph Berger; Alexandra Trkola; Jan Fehr; Milo A Puhan; Susi Kriemler; Anel Nurtay; Lucie Abeler-Dörner; David G Bonsall; Michael V McConnell; Shawn O'Banion; Christophe Fraser; Scott Roberts; Jose A. Gonzalez; Marciano Sablad; Rodrigo Yelin; Wendy Taylor; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Suezanne Parker; Priya Karmali; Jared Davis; Sean M Sullivan; Steve G. Hughes; Pad Chivukula; Eng Eong Ooi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.30.20184671 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction Seroprevalence SERO and transmission TRANS routes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD in children TRANS and adolescents, especially in school setting, are not clear. Resulting uncertainty is reflected in very different decisions on school closures and reopenings across countries. The aim of this longitudinal cohort study is to assess the extent and patterns of seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in school-attending children TRANS repeatedly. It will examine risk factors for infection MESHD, relationship between seropositivity and symptoms, and temporal persistence of antibodies SERO. Additionally, it will include testing of school personnel and parents TRANS. Methods and analysis The study (Ciao Corona) will enroll a regionally representative, random sample of schools in the canton of Zurich, where 18% of the Swiss population live. Children TRANS aged TRANS 5 to 16 years, attending classes in primary and secondary schools are invited. Venous blood MESHD blood SERO and saliva samples are collected for SARS-CoV-2 serological testing SERO after the first wave of infections (June/July 2020), in fall HP (October/November 2020), and after winter (March/April 2021). Venous blood MESHD blood SERO is also collected for serological testing SERO of parents TRANS and school personnel. Bi-monthly questionnaires to children TRANS, parents TRANS and school personnel cover SARS-CoV-2 symptoms MESHD and tests, health, preventive behavior, lifestyle and quality of life information. Total seroprevalence SERO and cumulative incidence will be calculated. Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models will account for sensitivity SERO and specificity of the serological test SERO in the analyses and for the complex sampling structure, i.e., clustering within classes and schools. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (2020-01336). The results of this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and will be made available to study participants and participating schools, the Federal Office of Public Health, and the Educational Department of the canton of Zurich. Trial registration number NCT04448717.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in children TRANS - A prospective multicentre cohort study.

    Authors: Thomas Waterfield; Chris Watson; Rebecca Moore; Kathryn Ferris; Claire Tonry; Alison P Watt; Claire McGinn; Steven Foster; Jennifer Evans; Mark D Lyttle; Shazaad Ahmad; Shamez Ladhani; Michael Corr; Lisa McFetridge; Hannah Mitchell; Kevin Brown; Gayatric Amirthalingam; Julie-Ann Maney; Sharon Christie; Angela Afonso; Marc Veldhoen; Matthew Harnett; Melody Eaton; Sandra Hatem; Hajra Jamal; Alara Akyatan; Alexandra Tabachnikova; Lora E. Liharska; Liam Cotter; Brian Fennessey; Akhil Vaid; Guillermo Barturen; Scott R. Tyler; Hardik Shah; Yinh-chih Wang; Shwetha Hara Sridhar; Juan Soto; Swaroop Bose; Kent Madrid; Ethan Ellis; Elyze Merzier; Konstantinos Vlachos; Nataly Fishman; Manying Tin; Melissa Smith; Hui Xie; Manishkumar Patel; Kimberly Argueta; Jocelyn Harris; Neha Karekar; Craig Batchelor; Jose Lacunza; Mahlet Yishak; Kevin Tuballes; Leisha Scott; Arvind Kumar; Suraj Jaladanki; Ryan Thompson; Evan Clark; Bojan Losic; - The Mount Sinai COVID-19 Biobank Team; Jun Zhu; Wenhui Wang; Andrew Kasarskis; Benjamin S. Glicksberg; Girish Nadkarni; Dusan Bogunovic; Cordelia Elaiho; Sandeep Gangadharan; George Ofori-Amanfo; Kasey Alesso-Carra; Kenan Onel; Karen M. Wilson; Carmen Argmann; Marta E. Alarcón-Riquelme; Thomas U. Marron; Adeeb Rahman; Seunghee Kim-Schulze; Sacha Gnjatic; Bruce D. Gelb; Miriam Merad; Robert Sebra; Eric E. Schadt; Alexander W. Charney

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20183095 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Background Studies based on molecular testing of oral/nasal swabs underestimate SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD due to issues with test sensitivity SERO and timing of testing. The objective of this study was to report the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO, consistent with previous infection MESHD, and to report the symptomatology of infection MESHD in children TRANS. Design This multicentre observational cohort study, conducted between 16th April - 3rd July 2020 at 5 UK sites, aimed to recruit 900 children TRANS aged TRANS 2 to 15 years of age TRANS. Participants provided blood SERO samples for SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO testing and data were gathered regarding unwell contacts and symptoms. Results 1007 participants were enrolled, and 992 were included in the final analysis. The median age TRANS of participants was 10.1 years. There were 68 (6.9%) participants with positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO tests indicative of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Of these, 34/68 (50%) reported no symptoms. The presence of antibodies SERO and the mean antibody SERO titre was not influenced by age TRANS. Following multivariate analysis 4 independent variables were identified as significantly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. These were: known infected household contact TRANS; fatigue HP fatigue MESHD; gastrointestinal symptoms; and changes in sense of smell or taste. Discussion In this study children TRANS demonstrated similar antibody SERO titres in response to SARS-CoV-2 irrespective of age TRANS. The symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in children TRANS were subtle but of those reported, fatigue HP fatigue MESHD, gastrointestinal symptoms MESHD and changes in sense of smell or taste were most strongly associated with antibody SERO positivity. Registration This study was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov (trial registration: NCT04347408) on the 15/04/2020.

    ASSOCIATION OF HYPERGLYCEMIA HP WITH HOSPITAL MORTALITY IN COVID-19 PATIENTS WITHOUT DIABETES MESHD: A COHORT STUDY

    Authors: Manju Mamtani; Ambarish M Athavale; Mohan Abraham; Jane Vernik; Amatur Amarah; Juan Ruiz; Amit Joshi; Matthew Itteera; Sara Zhukovsky; Ravi Prakash Madaiah; Peter Hart; Hemant Kulkarni

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.31.20185157 Date: 2020-09-02 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: Diabetes MESHD is a known risk factor for mortality in Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Our objective was to identify prevalence SERO of hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD in COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes MESHD and quantify its association with COVID-19 disease course. Research Design and Methods: In this observational cohort study, all consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to John H Stroger Jr. Hospital, Chicago, IL from March 15, 2020 to May 15, 2020 were included. The primary outcome was hospital mortality and the main predictor was hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD (any blood SERO glucose [≥]7.78 mmol/L during hospitalization). Results: Of 403 COVID-19 patients studied, 228 (57%) developed hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD. Of these, 83 (21%) had hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD without diabetes MESHD. A total of 51 (12.7%) patients died. Compared to the reference group no- diabetes MESHD/no- hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD patients the no- diabetes MESHD/ hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD patients showed higher mortality (1.8% versus 20.5%, adjusted odds ratio 21.94 (95% confidence interval 4.04-119.0), p < 0.001); improved prediction of death (p=0.0162) and faster progression to death (p=0.0051). Hyperglycemia HP Hyperglycemia MESHD within the first 24 and 48 hours was also significantly associated with mortality (odds ratio 2.15 and 3.31, respectively). Further, compared to the same reference group, no- diabetes MESHD/ hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD patients had higher risk of ICU admission (p<0.001), mechanical ventilation (p<0.001) and acute respiratory distress syndrome MESHD respiratory distress HP syndrome (p<0.001) and a longer hospital stay in survivors (p<0.001). Conclusions: Hyperglycemia HP Hyperglycemia MESHD in the absence of diabetes MESHD was common (21% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients) and was associated with an increased risk of and faster progression to death. Development of hyperglycemia HP hyperglycemia MESHD in COVID-19 patients who do not have diabetes MESHD is an early indicator of poor prognosis.

    Seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 in Palestine: a cross-sectional seroepidemiological study

    Authors: Nouar Qutob; Faisal Awartani; Zaidoun Salah; Mohammad Asia; Imad Abu Khader; Khaled Herzallah; Nadeen Balqis; Husam Sallam; William Wade; Jennifer Gallagher; Cecile Viboud; Hongjie Yu; Lars I Eriksson; Anna Norrby-Teglund; Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren; Niklas K Bjorkstrom; Soo Aleman; Marcus Buggert; Jonas Klingstrom; Kristoffer Stralin; Johan K. Sandberg

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180083 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Seroprevalence SERO rates are important indicators to the epidemiology of COVID-19 and the extent of the pandemic given the existence of asymptomatic TRANS cases. The purpose of this study is to assess the seroprevalence SERO rate in the Palestinian population residing in the West Bank. Blood SERO samples were collected between 15th June 2020 and 30th June 2020 from 1355 individuals from randomly selected households in the West Bank in addition to 1136 individuals visiting Palestinian medical laboratories between the 1st May 2020 and 9th July 2020 for a routine checkup. Out of the 2491 blood SERO samples collected, serological tests SERO for 2455 adequate serum samples SERO were done using an Immunoassay SERO for qualitative detection of antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 .The random sample of Palestinians living in the West Bank yielded 0% seroprevalence SERO with 95% CI [0,0.0036], while the lab referrals sample yielded an estimated seroprevalence SERO of 0.354% with 95% CI [0.0011,0096]. Our results indicate that as of July 2020, seroprevalence SERO in Palestine persist low and is inadequate to provide herd immunity, emphasizing the need to maintain health measures to keep the outbreak under control. Population-based seroprevalence SERO studies are to be conducted periodically to monitor the SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Palestine and inform policy makers about the efficacy of their surveillance system.

    Population-based seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 is more than halfway through the herd immunity threshold in the State of Maranhao, Brazil

    Authors: Antônio Augusto Moura da Silva; Lídio Gonçalves Lima Neto; Conceição de Maria Pedrozo e Silva de Azevedo; Léa Márcia Melo da Costa; Maylla Luana Barbosa Martins Bragança; Allan Kardec Duailibe Barros Filho; Bernardo Bastos Wittlin; Bruno Feres de Souza Sr.; Bruno Luciano Carneiro Alves de Oliveira; Carolina Abreu de Carvalho; Érika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Eudes Alves Simões Neto; Jamesson Ferreira Leite Júnior; Lécia Maria Sousa Santos Cosme; Marcos Adriano Garcia Campos; Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz; Sérgio Souza Costa; Vitória Abreu de Carvalho; Vanda Maria Ferreira Simóes; Maria Teresa Seabra Soares de Britto e Alves; Alcione Miranda dos Santos; Alberto Pasqualetto; Maylin Koo; Virginia Esteve; Arnau Antoli; Rafael Moreno; Sergi Yun; Pau Cerda; Mariona Llaberia; Francesc Formiga; Marta Fanlo; Abelardo Montero; David Chivite; Olga Capdevila; Ferran Bolao; Xavier Pinto; Josep Llop; Antoni Sabate; Jordi Guardiola; Josep M Cruzado; Josep Comin-Colet; Salud Santos; Ramon Jodar; Xavier Corbella

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.28.20180463 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Few population-based studies on the prevalence SERO of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) have been performed to date, and most of them have used lateral flow immunoassays SERO with finger-prick, which may yield false-negative results and thus underestimate the true infection rate. Methods: A population-based household survey was performed in the State of Maranhao, Brazil, from 27 July 2020 to 8 August 2020 to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 using a serum SERO testing electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO. A three-stage cluster sampling stratified by four state regions was used. The estimates took clustering, stratification, and non-response into account. Qualitative detection of IgM and IgG antibodies SERO was performed in a fully-automated Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 electrochemiluminescence immunoassay SERO on the Cobas e601 analyser (Roche Diagnostics). Findings: A total of 3156 individuals were interviewed. Seroprevalence SERO of total antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 was 40.4% (95%CI 35.6-45.3). Population adherence to non-pharmaceutical interventions was higher at the beginning of the pandemic than in the last month. SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD rates were significantly lower among mask wearers and among those who maintained social and physical distancing in the last month compared to their counterparts. Among the infected, 62.2% had more than three symptoms, 11.1% had one or two symptoms, and 26.0% were asymptomatic TRANS. The infection MESHD fatality rate was 0.17%, higher for males TRANS and advanced age groups TRANS. The ratio of estimated infections MESHD to reported cases was 22.2. Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, the seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 estimated in this population-based survey was the highest and the closest to the herd immunity threshold reported to date. Our results suggest that the herd immunity threshold is not as low as 20%, but at least higher than or equal to around 40%. The infection MESHD fatality rate was one of the lowest reported so far, and the proportion of asymptomatic TRANS cases was low.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO in hospitalized patients in a tertiary referral center in North India

    Authors: Animesh Ray; Komal Singh; Souvick Chattopadhyay; Farha Mehdi; Gaurav Batra; Aakansha Gupta; Ayush Agarwal; Bhavesh M; Shubham Sahni; Chaithra R; Shubham Agarwal; Chitrakshi Nagpal; Gagantej B H; Umang Arora; Kartikeya Kumar Sharma; Ranveer Singh Jadon; Ashish Datt Upadhyay; Neeraj Nischal; Naval K Vikram; Manish Soneja; R M Pandey; Naveet Wig; Alessandra C. Sanchez; Haifa L. Gaza; Geraldine M. Arevalo; Coleen M. Pangilinan; Shaira A. Acosta; Melanie V. Salinas; Brian E. Schwem; Angelo D. Dela Tonga; Ma. Jowina H. Galarion; Nina Theresa P. Dungca; Stessi G. Geganzo; Neil Andrew D. Bascos; Eva Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz; Cynthia P. Saloma; Alberto L Garcia-Basteiro

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.22.20179937 Date: 2020-08-25 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Seroprevalence SERO of IgG antibodies SERO against SARS-CoV-2 is an important tool to estimate the true extent of infection MESHD in a population. However, seroprevalence SERO studies have been scarce in South East Asia including India, which, as of now, carries the third largest burden of confirmed cases TRANS in the world. The present study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence SERO of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO among hospitalized patients at one of the largest government hospital in India. Method: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a tertiary care hospital in North India, recruited consecutive patients who were negative for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR or CB-NAAT. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO levels targeting recombinant spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) protein of SARS CoV-2 were estimated in serum samples SERO by the ELISA SERO method. Results: A total of 212 hospitalized patients were recruited in the study with mean age TRANS (+/-SD) of 41.2 (+/-15.4) years and 55% male TRANS population. Positive serology against SARS CoV-2 was detected in 19.8% patients(95% CI 14.7-25.8). Residency in Delhi conferred a higher frequency of seropositivity 26.5% (95% CI 19.3-34.7) as compared to that of other states 8% (95% CI 3.0-16.4) with p-value 0.001. No particular age groups TRANS or socio-economic strata showed a higher proportion of seropositivity. Conclusion: Around, one-fifth of hospitalized patients, who were not diagnosed with COVID-19 before, demonstrated seropositivity against SARS-CoV-2. While there was no significant difference in the different age groups TRANS and socio-economic classes; residence in Delhi was associated with increased risk (relative risk of 3.62, 95% CI 1.59-8.21) Key Words: SARS-CoV-2 IgG Antibody SERO, Seroprevalence SERO, Hospitalized patient, COVID-19

    SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro Whole Human Proteome Cleavage Prediction and Enrichment/Depletion Analysis

    Authors: Lucas Prescott; Kerstin Wernike; Donata Hoffmann; Thomas C. Mettenleiter; Martin Beer; Meabh MacMahon; Winnie Lei; Nicholas M Katritsis; Anika Liu; Alison Schuldt; Rebecca Harris; Kathryn Chapman; Frank McCaughan; Friedemann Weber; Tony Kouzarides; Marie G Ponce; Samuel LaCapra; Frank J Cunningham; Arthur G Calise; Bradley L Pulver; Dominic Ruocco; Greggory E Mojares; Michael P Eagan; Kristy L Ziontz; Paul Mastrokyriakos; Stuart L Goldberg; Felecia Cerrato; Maha Farhat; Damien Slater; Jason B Harris; John Branda; David Hooper; Jessie M Gaeta; Travis P. Baggett; James O'Connell; Andreas Gnirke; Tami D Lieberman; Anthony Philippakis; Meagan Burns; Catherine Brown; Jeremy Luban; Edward T Ryan; Sarah E Turbett; Regina C LaRocque; William P. Hanage; Glen Gallagher; Lawrence C Madoff; Sandra Smole; Virginia M. Pierce; Eric S Rosenberg; Pardis Sabeti; Daniel J Park; Bronwyn L MacInnis

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.24.265645 Date: 2020-08-25 Source: bioRxiv

    A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has devastated the globe as a pandemic that has killed more than 800,000 people. Effective and widespread vaccination is still uncertain, so many scientific efforts have been directed towards discovering antiviral treatments. Many drugs are being investigated to inhibit the coronavirus main protease, 3CLpro, from cleaving its viral polyprotein, but few publications have addressed this proteases interactions with the host proteome or their probable contribution to virulence. Too few host protein cleavages have been experimentally verified to fully understand 3CLpros global effects on relevant cellular pathways and tissues. Here, we set out to determine this proteases targets and corresponding potential drug targets. Using a neural network trained on coronavirus proteomes with a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.983, we predict that a large proportion of the human proteome is vulnerable to 3CLpro, with 4,460 out of approximately 20,000 human proteins containing at least one predicted cleavage site. These cleavages are nonrandomly distributed and are enriched in the epithelium along the respiratory tract, brain, testis, plasma SERO, and immune tissues and depleted in olfactory and gustatory receptors despite the prevalence SERO of anosmia HP anosmia MESHD and ageusia in COVID-19 patients. Affected cellular pathways include cytoskeleton/motor/cell adhesion proteins, nuclear condensation and other epigenetics, host transcription and RNAi, coagulation, pattern recognition receptors, growth factor, lipoproteins, redox, ubiquitination, and apoptosis. This whole proteome cleavage prediction demonstrates the importance of 3CLpro in expected and nontrivial pathways affecting virulence, lead us to propose more than a dozen potential therapeutic targets against coronaviruses, and should therefore be applied to all viral proteases and experimentally verified.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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