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SARS-CoV-2 proteins

NSP5 (1)


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SARS-CoV-2 Proteins
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    Lack of lockdown, open borders, and no vaccination in sight: is Bosnia and Herzegovina a control group?

    Authors: Adnan Fojnica; Ahmed Osmanovic; Nermin Duzic; Armin Fejzic; Ensar Mekic; Zehra Gromilic; Imer Muhovic; Amina Kurtovic-Kozaric

    doi:10.1101/2021.03.01.21252700 Date: 2021-03-03 Source: medRxiv

    Bosnia and Herzegovina is among ten countries in the world with the highest mortality rate due to COVID-19 infection MESHD. Lack of lockdown, open borders, high mortality rate, no herd immunity, no vaccination plan, and strong domestic anti-vaccination movement present serious COVID-19 MESHD concerns in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In such circumstances, we set out to study if the population is willing to receive the vaccine. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 10,471 adults in Bosnia and Herzegovina to assess the attitude of participants toward COVID-19 MESHD vaccination. Using a logistic regression model, we assessed the associations of sociodemographic characteristics with vaccine rejection, reasons for vaccine hesitancy, preferred vaccine manufacturer, and information sources. Surprisingly, only 25.7% of respondents indicated they would like to get a COVID-19 MESHD vaccine, while 74.3% of respondents were either hesitant or completely rejected vaccination. The vaccine acceptance increased with increasing age, education, and income level. Major motivation of pro-vaccination behaviour was intention to achieve collective immunity (30.1%), while the leading incentive for vaccine refusal was deficiency of clinical data (30.2%). The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is shown to be eightfold more preferred vaccine compared to the other manufacturers. For the first time, vaccine acceptance among health care professionals has been reported, where only 39.4% of healthcare professionals expressed willingness to get vaccinated. With the high share of the population unwilling to vaccinate, governmental impotence MESHD in securing the vaccines supplies, combined with the lack of any lockdown measures suggests that Bosnia and Herzegovina is unlikely to put COVID-19 pandemic MESHD under control in near future.

    Fear and death anxiety MESHD among Latin American doctors during the Covid-19 pandemic MESHD

    Authors: Miguel A Perez; Sonia Indacochea; Jenny Raquel Torres-Malca; Victor Juan Vera-Ponce; Jhony A De La Cruz-Vargas

    doi:10.1101/2021.02.12.21251445 Date: 2021-02-16 Source: medRxiv

    Introduction: A patient s death MESHD elicits various feelings arise in doctors such as impotence MESHD and guilt that could trigger physical or psychological symptoms. Despite its impact, few studies have explored anxiety MESHD and fear of death among physicians. Objective: To evaluate perceptions and responses to one s mortality among Latin American physicians treating COVID-19 MESHD patients. Methodology: This cross-sectional study utilized the Collet-Lester Modified Fear of Death Scale and the Death Anxiety MESHD Scale (DAS) to collect data from physicians in Latin America. Results: 219 doctors from Peru, Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia filled out the online questionnaire. Fear of death among the sample population ranged from 56.2% to 90%. Furthermore, the prevalence of " High Anxiety MESHD" was 80.8%. A statistically significant association was found between fear according to age and time of graduation (p = 0.010 and p = 0.020, respectively). No differences were found by gender, age, and country of origin or practice. Conclusion: Physicians experience feelings of helplessness and guilt upon the death of a patient and those feelings can trigger physical or psychological symptoms. For these states of fear and anxiety about death MESHD, more frequent in times of pandemic, doctors must be prepared, and institutions must provide them with the necessary means to help them overcome these difficult times.

    Methodology for Triage of Urologic Surgical Cases in the Setting of A Pandemic

    Authors: Ahmed Aboumohamed; Josh Gottlieb; Matthew DeMasi; Emily Barry; Kara Watts

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-102451/v1 Date: 2020-11-03 Source: ResearchSquare

    Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic MESHD COVID-19 pandemic MESHD forced our healthcare system in the Bronx, New York to cancel nearly all surgeries. With the possible second wave approaching, we developed a framework for the prioritization of Urologic surgeries that can be used as a model for those experiencing surges elsewhere. Methods: Each surgeon in the department was asked to rank their cancelled surgeries by priority (Level 1 – least urgent; Level 2 – moderately urgent; Level 3 – most urgent). A committee of urologists assigned a subclass to Level 3 and 2 cases (3a – least urgent; 3b – moderately urgent; 3c – most urgent; 2a – lower priority; 2b – higher priority). The committee then reviewed cases by urgency to arrive on a final priority ranking. Results: A total of 478 total cases were categorized: 250 Level 1, 130 Level 2, 98 Level 3 (73 adult, 25 pediatric). Level 3c involved renal cell carcinoma MESHD ≥ T2b, high-grade bladder urothelial carcinoma, adrenal mass/cancer MESHD > 6 cm, testicular cancer MESHD requiring radical orchiectomy, and penile cancer MESHD. Level 3b involved T2a renal masses requiring nephrectomy; high-risk prostate cancer MESHD and symptomatic nephrolithiasis MESHD were classified as 3a. Level 2 included testicular cancer MESHD requiring retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and complicated benign prostatic hyperplasia MESHD. Surgeries for urologic reconstruction, erectile dysfunction MESHD, and incontinence MESHD were considered Level 1.Conclusions: Our disease-specific approach to surgical rescheduling offers appropriate guidance for triaging Urologic surgeries. Our system can provide guidance to other institutions as COVID-19 MESHD surges in different regions and with the growing possibility of a second wave.

    Methodology for the Triage of Urologic Surgical Cases in the Setting of a Pandemic

    Authors: Ahmed Aboumohamed; Josh Gottlieb; Matthew DeMasi; Emily Barry; Kara Watts

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-98427/v1 Date: 2020-10-26 Source: ResearchSquare

    Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic MESHD COVID-19 pandemic MESHD forced our healthcare system in the Bronx, New York to cancel nearly all surgeries. With the possible second wave approaching, we developed a framework for the prioritization of Urologic surgeries that can be used as a model for those experiencing surges elsewhere. Methods: Each surgeon in the department was asked to rank their cancelled surgeries by priority (Level 1 – least urgent; Level 2 – moderately urgent; Level 3 – most urgent). A committee of urologists assigned a subclass to Level 3 and 2 cases (3a – least urgent; 3b – moderately urgent; 3c – most urgent; 2a – lower priority; 2b – higher priority). The committee then reviewed cases by urgency to arrive on a final priority ranking. Results: A total of 478 total cases were categorized: 250 Level 1, 130 Level 2, 98 Level 3 (73 adult, 25 pediatric). Level 3c involved renal cell carcinoma MESHD ≥ T2b, high-grade bladder urothelial carcinoma, adrenal mass/cancer MESHD > 6 cm, testicular cancer MESHD requiring radical orchiectomy, and penile cancer MESHD. Level 3b involved T2a renal masses requiring nephrectomy; high-risk prostate cancer MESHD and symptomatic nephrolithiasis MESHD were classified as 3a. Level 2 included testicular cancer MESHD requiring retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and complicated benign prostatic hyperplasia MESHD. Surgeries for urologic reconstruction, erectile dysfunction MESHD, and incontinence MESHD were considered Level 1.Conclusions: Our disease-specific approach to surgical rescheduling offers appropriate guidance for triaging Urologic surgeries. Our system can provide guidance to other institutions as COVID-19 MESHD surges in different regions and with the growing possibility of a second wave.

    Computational screening of repurposed drugs and natural products against SARS-Cov-2 main protease PROTEIN ( Mpro PROTEIN) as potential COVID-19 MESHD therapies

    Authors: Sakshi Piplani; Puneet Singh; Nikolai Petrovsky; David A. Winkler

    id:2009.00744v1 Date: 2020-09-01 Source: arXiv

    There remains an urgent need to identify existing drugs that might be suitable for treating patients suffering from COVID-19 MESHD infection. Drugs rarely act at a single molecular target, with off target effects often being responsible for undesirable side effects and sometimes, beneficial synergy between targets for a specific illness. Off target activities have also led to blockbuster drugs in some cases, e.g. Viagra for erectile dysfunction MESHD and Minoxidil for male pattern hair loss. Drugs already in use or in clinical trials plus approved natural products constitute a rich resource for discovery of therapeutic agents that can be repurposed for existing and new conditions, based on the rationale that they have already been assessed for safety in man. A key question then is how to rapidly and efficiently screen such compounds for activity against new pandemic pathogens such as COVID-19 MESHD. Here we show how a fast and robust computational process can be used to screen large libraries of drugs and natural compounds to identify those that may inhibit the main protease PROTEIN of SARS-Cov-2 (3CL pro, Mpro PROTEIN). We show how the resulting shortlist of candidates with strongest binding affinities is highly enriched in compounds that have been independently identified as potential antivirals against COVID-19 MESHD. The top candidates also include a substantial number of drugs and natural products not previously identified as having potential COVID-19 MESHD activity, thereby providing additional targets for experimental validation. This in silico screening pipeline may also be useful for repurposing of existing drugs and discovery of new drug candidates against other medically important pathogens and for use in future pandemics.

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MeSH Disease
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SARS-CoV-2 Proteins


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