Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Hypertension (443)

Fever (98)

Cough (85)

Pneumonia (79)

Obesity (73)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 171 - 180 records in total 443
    records per page




    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: systematic review and analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.18.20134478 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: medRxiv

    A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. This disease, originating in Wuhan, China, has become a global pandemic. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance. This research is intended to offer a systematic review/meta-analysis for assessing how common clinical conditions and comorbidities correlate with COVID-19. The meta-analysis incorporated seven studies covering 4101 COVID-19 patients from Chinese hospitals who had their diagnosis confirmed through laboratory testing. The findings demonstrate that the most common comorbidities with the disease were COPD MESHD (2.53%, OR 3.24 [95% CI: 1.99-4.45], p< 0.0006), cardiovascular disease MESHD (10.76%, OR 2.89 [95% CI: 1.90-4.40], p <0.0001), coronary heart disease MESHD (5.52%, OR 2.97 [95% CI: 1.99-4.45], p <0.0001), diabetes MESHD (11.34%, OR 2.27, [95% CI: 1.46-3.53], p = 0.0003), and hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (22.07%, OR 2.43 [95% CI: 1.71-3.45], p <0.0001). No significant associations were found for disease severity with the comorbidities of kidney disease MESHD, liver disease MESHD, or cancer MESHD. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms were fever HP fever MESHD (74.52%, OR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.01-1.86, p = 0.04), cough HP (62.15%, OR 1.25, 95% CI: 0.97-1.60, p = 0.0823), myalgia HP myalgia MESHD/ fatigue HP fatigue MESHD (38.77%, OR 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11-1.55, p = 0.0018), dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD (33.9%, OR 3.61, 95% CI: 2.57-5.06, p = <0.0001), respiratory failure HP respiratory failure MESHD/ARDS (20.6%, OR 11.46, 95% CI: 3.24-40.56, p = 0.0002), diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD (11.21%) and chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD/ pain HP (16.82%, OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.40-3.36, p = 0.0006). Meta-analysis also revealed that neither the duration of the incubation period TRANS nor current smoking status associated with disease severity.

    PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN SPANISH COVID-19 PATIENTS: A CASE SERIES FROM BARCELONA

    Authors: Antoni Sisó-Almirall; Belchin Kostov; Minerva Mas-Heredia; Sergi Vilanova-Rotllan; Ethel Sequeira-Aymar; Mireia Sans-Corrales; Elisenda Sant-Arderiu; Laia Cayuelas-Redondo; Angela Martínez-Pérez; Noemí García Plana; August Anguita-Guimet; Jaume Benavent-Àreu

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.18.20134510 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: medRxiv

    Background In addition to the lack of COVID-19 diagnostic tests for the whole Spanish population, the current strategy is to identify the disease early to limit contagion in the community. Aim To determine clinical factors of a poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19 infection MESHD. Design and Setting Descriptive, observational, retrospective study in three primary healthcare centres with an assigned population of 100,000. Method Examination of the medical records of patients with COVID-19 infections confirmed TRANS by polymerase chain reaction. Results We included 322 patients (mean age TRANS 56.7 years, 50% female TRANS, 115 (35.7%) aged TRANS [≥] 65 years). The best predictors of ICU admission or death MESHD were greater age TRANS, male TRANS sex (OR=2.99; 95%CI=1.55 to 6.01), fever HP fever MESHD (OR=2.18; 95%CI=1.06 to 4.80), dyspnoea MESHD (OR=2.22; 95%CI=1.14 to 4.24), low oxygen saturation (OR=2.94; 95%CI=1.34 to 6.42), auscultatory alterations (OR=2.21; 95%CI=1.00 to 5.29), heart disease MESHD (OR=4.37; 95%CI=1.68 to 11.13), autoimmune disease MESHD (OR=4.03; 95%CI=1.41 to 11.10), diabetes MESHD (OR=4.00; 95%CI=1.89 to 8.36), hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (OR=3.92; 95%CI=2.07 to 7.53), bilateral pulmonary infiltrates HP (OR=3.56; 95%CI=1.70 to 7.96), elevated lactate-dehydrogenase (OR=3.02; 95%CI=1.30 to 7.68), elevated C-reactive protein (OR=2.94; 95%CI=1.47 to 5.97), elevated D-dimer (OR=2.66; 95%CI=1.15 to 6.51) and low platelet count (OR=2.41; 95%CI=1.12 to 5.14). Myalgia HP Myalgia MESHD or artralgia (OR=0.28; 95%CI=0.10 to 0.66), dysgeusia MESHD (OR=0.28; 95%CI=0.05 to 0.92) and anosmia HP anosmia MESHD (OR=0.23; 95%CI=0.04 to 0.75) were protective factors. Conclusion Determining the clinical, biological and radiological characteristics of patients with suspected COVID-19 infection MESHD will be key to early treatment and isolation and the tracing of contacts TRANS.

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A systematic review and analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v2 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance.Aim: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19.Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2.Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease MESHD (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer MESHD (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease MESHD (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD MESHD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease MESHD (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms were fever HP fever MESHD (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP myalgia MESHD/ fatigue HP fatigue MESHD (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP dyspnea MESHD (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease MESHD, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP diarrhea MESHD or chest tightness HP chest tightness MESHD/ pain HP pain MESHD were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease MESHD, and coronary heart disease MESHD, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes MESHD and hypertension HP hypertension MESHD and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity. 

    The influence of comorbidity on the severity of COVID-19 disease: A scoping review and meta-analysis

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Elfadil Abdalla Mohamed; Sahar Ibrahim; Gulfaraz Khan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-37127/v3 Date: 2020-06-20 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: A novel form of coronavirus disease MESHD (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the world. What risk factors influence the severity of the disease is of considerable importance. Objectives: This research offers a systematic review and meta-analysis of the correlation between common clinical conditions and comorbidities and the severity of COVID-19. Methodology: Two independent researchers searched Europe PMC, Google Scholar, and PubMed databases for articles related to influence comorbidities have on the progress of the disease. A search engine was also created to screen a further 59,000 articles in COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). Random-effects modeling was used to pool 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and odds ratios (ORs). The significance of all comorbidities and clinical conditions to the severity of the disease was evaluated by employing machine-learning techniques. Publication bias was assessed by using funnel-plots and Egger’s-test. Heterogeneity was tested using I2. Results: The meta-analysis incorporated 12 studies spanning 4,101 confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted to Chinese hospitals. The prevalence SERO of the most commonly associated co-morbidities and their corresponding odds ratio for disease severity were as follows: coronary heart disease (OR 2.97 [CI: 1.99-4.45], p < 0.0001), cancer (OR 2.65 [CI: 1.12-6.29], p < 0.03), cardiovascular disease (OR 2.89 [CI: 1.90-4.40], p < 0.0001), COPD (OR 3.24 [CI: 1.66-6.32], p = 0.0), and kidney disease (OR 2.2.4 [CI: 1.01-4.99], p = 0.05) with low or moderate level of heterogeneity. The most frequently exhibited clinical symptoms recorded during the course of admission were fever HP (OR 1.37 [CI: 1.01-1.86], p = 0.04), myalgia HP/ fatigue HP (OR 1.31 [CI: 1.11-1.55], p = 0.0018), and dyspnea HP (OR 3.61, [CI: 2.57-5.06], p = <0.0001). No significant associations between disease severity and liver disease, smoking habits, and other clinical conditions, such as a cough HP, respiratory/ARDS, diarrhea HP or chest tightness HP/ pain HP were found. The meta-analysis also revealed that the incubation period TRANS was positively associated with disease severity. Conclusion: Existing comorbidities, including COPD, cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease, increase the severity of COVID-19. Some studies found a statistically significant association between comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension HP and disease severity. However, these studies may be biased due to substantial heterogeneity.

    Clinical Characteristics and Prognosis of Patients with COVID-19 Combineded with or without Diabetes MESHD, Hypertension HP Hypertension MESHD or Coronary

    Authors: Haoxiang Li; Jianguo Zhang; Jinhui Zhang; Ling Yang; Dong Wang; Li Zhao; Xia Deng; Guoyue Yuan

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-36840/v1 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: ResearchSquare

    Bcakground: This study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of COVID-19 patients combined with or without major chronic diseases MESHD like diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD or coronary. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 183 patients with COVID-19 diagnosed at First People's Hospital of Jiangxia District (FPHJD) in Wuhan, China attended by Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University supporting medical team from February 1, 2020 to March 15, 2020. Patients were divided into simple COVID-19 group(n=134), COVID-19 combined with diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD or coronary group(n=49). Besides, COVID-19 patients with diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD or coronary were further classified into severe pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD group(n=23) and common pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD group(n=26), death MESHD group(n=17) and survival group(n=32). The prognosis of COVID-19 patients was evaluated by analyzing the clinical data and the results of laboratory tests. Results: 183 patients were included in this study, of whom 166 were discharged and 16 died in hospital. 49 (26.92%) patients had a comorbidity, with hypertension HP hypertension MESHD being the most common [37 (20.33%) patients], followed by diabetes MESHD [25 (13.74%) patients] and coronary heart disease MESHD [4 (2.2%) patients]. Compared with simple COVID-19 group, the proportion of history of chronic respiratory system disease MESHD, age TRANS, D-dimer, procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, myoglobin, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase MB, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage, blood SERO urea nitrogen, creatinine and mortality rate were significantly higher in COVID-19 combined with chronic diseases group, whereas lymphocyte count, lymphocyte percentage and alanine transferase were significantly lower in COVID-19 combined with chronic diseases group. Among COVID-19 patients with chronic diseases MESHD, D-dimer, procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, myoglobin, cardiac troponin I, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage, blood SERO urea nitrogen, death MESHD rate was significantly higher in severe pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD group than common pneumonia HP group. While lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage were significantly lower in severe pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD group than common pneumonia HP group. Besides, we found that the proportion of history of chronic respiratory system disease MESHD, D-dimer, procalcitonin, myoglobin, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase MB, lactate dehydrogenase, neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage, blood SERO urea nitrogen were significantly higher in death group compared with survival group, whereas lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage were significantly lower in survival group. In COVID-19 combined with chronic diseases group, univariate logistic regression showed that the risk for severe pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD were D-dimer, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count and neutrophil percentage. Univariate logistic regression also showed that the risk for death MESHD were D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage and blood SERO urea nitrogen. Multivariate regression logistic showed that lactate dehydrogenase were independent risk factors for death among COVID-19 patients combined with chronic diseases MESHD. Cox regression analysis showed that compared with simple COVID-19 group, the RR(95% CI) in COVID-19 patients combined with diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, and coronary were 2.187 (1.141~4.191) for death MESHD (P<0.05). Conclusion: Among COVID-19 patients combined with diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD or coronary, the risk factors for severe pneumonia HP pneumonia MESHD were D-dimer, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count and neutrophil percentage, whereas the risk factors for death MESHD were D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, white blood SERO cell count, neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage and blood SERO urea nitrogen. Moreover, lactate dehydrogenase were independent risk factors for death MESHD. The mortality rate of COVID-19 patients combined with diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD or coronary was higher than that of simple COVID-19 patients.

    Association of hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, diabetes MESHD, stroke HP stroke MESHD, cancer MESHD, kidney disease MESHD, and high-cholesterol with COVID-19 disease severity and fatality: a systematic review

    Authors: Nazar Zaki; Hany Alashwal; Sahar Ibrahim

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.16.20132639 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: medRxiv

    Objective: To undertake a review and critical appraisal of published/preprint reports that offer methods of determining the effects of hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, diabetes MESHD, stroke HP stroke MESHD, cancer MESHD, kidney issues, and high-cholesterol on COVID-19 disease severity. Data sources: Google Scholar, PubMed, COVID-19 Open Research Dataset: a resource of over 128,000 scholarly articles, including over 59,000 articles with full text related to COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, and coronaviruses. Methods: A search was conducted by two authors independently on the freely available COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19). We developed an automated search engine to screen a total of 59,000 articles in a few seconds. The search engine was built using a retrieval function that ranks a set of documents based on the query terms appearing in each document regardless of their proximity within the document. Filtering of the articles was then undertaken using keywords and questions, e.g. "Effects of diabetes MESHD on COVID/normal coronavirus/SARS-CoV-2/nCoV/COVID-19 disease severity, mortality?". The search terms were repeated for all the comorbidities considered in this paper. Additional articles were retrieved by searching via Google Scholar and PubMed. Findings: A total of 54 articles were considered for a full review. It was observed that diabetes MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD, and cholesterol levels possess an apparent relation to COVID-19 severity. Other comorbidities, such as cancer MESHD, kidney disease MESHD, and stroke HP stroke MESHD, must be further evaluated to determine a strong relationship to the virus. Reports associating cancer MESHD, kidney disease MESHD, and stroke HP stroke MESHD with COVID-19 should be carefully interpreted, not only because of the size of the samples, but also because patients could be old, have a history of smoking, or have any other clinical condition suggesting that these factors might be associated with the poor COVID-19 outcomes rather than the comorbidity itself. Such reports could lead many oncologists and physicians to change their treatment strategies without solid evidence and recommendations. Further research regarding this relationship and its clinical management is warranted. Additionally, treatment options must be examined further to provide optimal treatment and ensure better outcomes for patients suffering from these comorbidities. It should be noted that, whether definitive measurements exist or not, the care of patients as well as the research involved should be largely prioritized to tackle this deadly pandemic.

    Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Evolution of Patients Attended with COVID-19 in a National Reference Hospital from Lima, Peru MESHD

    Authors: Germán V. Valenzuela; Alfonso J. Rodriguez-Morales; Roxana Mamani; Ricardo Ayala; Katherine Pérez; Cynthia Sarmiento; Jessica Calcino; Luis García; José Amado

    id:10.20944/preprints202006.0237.v1 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: Preprints.org

    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) fatal outcomes have been associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. In new epidemic areas, such as Latin America, there is a lack of studies about this. Here, we evaluated those factors in a retrospective cohort of patients in a national reference hospital of Lima, Peru. Design. A retrospective cohort observational study was done. For this study, information was obtained from clinical records of the hospital for the cases that were laboratory-diagnosed and related, during March 6th and April 30th, 2020. rRT-PCR was used for the detection of the RNA of SARS-CoV-2 following the protocol Charité, Berlin, Germany, from nasopharyngeal swabs at the National Institute of Health. Calculation of the odds ratio (OR) with the respective 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was done, also logistic regression for adjusted OR (multivariate) was done. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant for all analyses. Results. One hundred six hospitalized patients were evaluated. The mean age TRANS of patients was 61.58 years (SD 16.81). Cardiovascular risk factors among them were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (46.2%), diabetes MESHD (28.3%), and obesity HP obesity MESHD (28.3%), among others. Fifty-six patients died (52.8%). Mortality associated factors at the multivariate analysis were arterial hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (OR=1.343, 95% 1.089-1.667), myocardial injury MESHD (OR=1.303, 95% 1.031-1.642), and mechanical ventilation (OR 1.262, 95% 1.034-1.665), as associated factors. Conclusion. As observed in other regions of the world, cardiovascular risk factors represent a significant and independent threat to be considered in patients with COVID-19. Further studies and interventions in Peru and Latin America are expected.

    Machine learning prediction for mortality of patients diagnosed with COVID-19: a nationwide Korean cohort study

    Authors: Chansik An; Hyunsun Lim; Dong-Wook Kim; Jung Hyun Chang; Yoon Jung Choi; Seong Woo Kim

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-36458/v1 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: ResearchSquare

    The rapid spread of COVID-19 is likely to result in the shortage of medical resources, which necessitates accurate prognosis prediction to triage patients effectively. This study used the nationwide cohort of South Korea to develop a machine learning model to predict prognosis based on sociodemographic and medical information. Of 10,237 COVID-19 patients, 228 (2.2%) died, 7,772 (75.9%) recovered, and 2,237 (21.9%) were still in isolation or being treated at the last follow-up (April 16, 2020). The Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that age TRANS > 70, male TRANS sex, moderate or severe disability, the presence of symptoms, nursing home residence, and comorbidities of diabetes mellitus HP diabetes mellitus MESHD ( DM MESHD), chronic lung disease HP chronic lung disease MESHD, or asthma HP asthma MESHD were significantly associated with increased risk of mortality (p ≤ 0.047). For machine learning, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), linear support vector machine (SVM), SVM with radial basis function kernel, random forest (RF), and k-nearest neighbors were tested. In prediction of mortality, LASSO and linear SVM demonstrated high sensitivities SERO (90.3% [95% confidence interval: 83.3, 97.3]and 92.0% [85.9, 98.1], respectively) and specificities (91.4% [90.3, 92.5] and 91.8%, [90.7, 92.9], respectively) while maintaining high specificities >90%. The most significant predictors for LASSO included old age TRANS and preexisting DM MESHD or cancer MESHD; for RF they were old age TRANS, infection MESHD route (at large clusters or from personal contact with an infected individual), and underlying hypertension HP hypertension MESHD. The proposed prediction model may be helpful for the quick triage of patients without having to wait for the results of additional tests such as laboratory or radiologic studies, during a pandemic when limited medical resources have to be wisely allocated without hesitation.

    Analysis of Genetic Host Response Risk Factors in Severe COVID-19 Patients

    Authors: Krystyna Taylor; Sayoni Das; Matthew Pearson; James Kozubek; Marcin Pawlowski; Claus Erik Jensen; Zbigniew Skowron; Gert Lykke Møller; Mark Strivens; Steve Gardner

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.17.20134015 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: medRxiv

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological studies indicate that as many as 20% of individuals who test positive for COVID-19 develop severe symptoms that can require hospitalization. These symptoms include low platelet count, severe hypoxia MESHD, increased inflammatory cytokines and reduced glomerular filtration rate. Additionally, severe COVID-19 is associated with several chronic co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease MESHD, hypertension HP hypertension MESHD and type 2 diabetes mellitus MESHD diabetes mellitus HP. The identification of genetic risk factors that impact differential host responses to SARS-CoV-2, resulting in the development of severe COVID-19, is important in gaining greater understanding into the biological mechanisms underpinning life-threatening responses to the virus. These insights could be used in the identification of high-risk individuals and for the development of treatment strategies for these patients. METHODS As of June 6, 2020, there were 976 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 and were hospitalized, indicating they had a severe response to SARS-CoV-2. There were however too few patients with a mild form of COVID-19 to use this cohort as our control population. Instead we used similar control criteria to our previous study looking at shared genetic risk factors between severe COVID-19 and sepsis HP sepsis MESHD, selecting controls who had not developed sepsis HP sepsis MESHD despite having maximum co-morbidity risk and exposure to sepsis HP sepsis MESHD-causing pathogens. RESULTS Using a combinatorial (high-order epistasis) analysis approach, we identified 68 protein-coding genes that were highly associated with severe COVID-19. At the time of analysis, nine of these genes have been linked to differential response to SARS-CoV-2. We also found many novel targets that are involved in key biological pathways associated with the development of severe COVID-19, including production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, endothelial cell dysfunction, lipid droplets, neurodegeneration HP neurodegeneration MESHD and viral susceptibility factors. CONCLUSION The variants we found in genes relating to immune response pathways and cytokine production cascades, were in equal proportions across all severe COVID-19 patients, regardless of their co-morbidities. This suggests that such variants are not associated with any specific co-morbidity, but are common amongst patients who develop severe COVID-19. Among the 68 severe COVID-19 risk-associated genes, we found several druggable protein targets and pathways. Nine are targeted by drugs that have reached at least Phase I clinical trials, and a further eight have active chemical starting points for novel drug development. Several of these targets were particularly enriched in specific co-morbidities, providing insights into shared pathological mechanisms underlying both the development of severe COVID-19, ARDS and these predisposing co-morbidities. We can use these insights to identify patients who are at greatest risk of contracting severe COVID-19 and develop targeted therapeutic strategies for them, with the aim of improving disease burden and survival rates.

    Impact of diabetes MESHD on COVID-19-related in-hospital mortality: a retrospective study from Northern Italy

    Authors: Stefano Ciardullo; Francesca Zerbini; Silvia Perra; Emanuele Muraca; Rosa Cannistraci; Marinella Lauriola; Paolo Grosso; Guido Lattuada; Giovanbattista Ippoliti; Andrea Mortara; Giuseppina Manzoni; Gianluca Perseghin

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-36391/v1 Date: 2020-06-18 Source: ResearchSquare

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-existing diabetes MESHD on in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19).Methods. This is a single center, retrospective study conducted at Policlinico di Monza hospital, located in the Lombardy region, Northern Italy. We reviewed medical records of 373 consecutive adult TRANS patients who were hospitalized with COVID-19 between February 22 and May 15, 2020. Data were collected on diabetes MESHD status, comorbid conditions and laboratory findings. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate the effect of diabetes MESHD on in-hospital mortality after adjustment for potential confounding variables.Results. Mean age TRANS of the patients was 72 ± 14 years (range 17-98), 244 (65.4%) were male TRANS and 69 (18.5%) had diabetes MESHD. The most common comorbid conditions were hypertension HP hypertension MESHD (237 [64.8%]), cardiovascular disease MESHD (140 [37.7%]) and malignant neoplasms MESHD neoplasms HP (50 [13.6%]). In-hospital death occurred in 142 (38.0%) patients. In the multivariable model older age TRANS (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.07 [1.04-1.10] per year), diabetes MESHD (OR 2.2 [1.10-4.73]), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease HP chronic obstructive pulmonary disease MESHD (OR 3.30 [1.22-8.90]), higher values of lactic dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein were independently associated with in-hospital mortality.Conclusion. In this retrospective single-center study, diabetes MESHD was independently associated with a higher in-hospital mortality. More intensive surveillance of patients with this condition is to be warranted.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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