Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence

antibody (2)

    displaying 1 - 3 records in total 3
    records per page




    Disruption of Adaptive Immunity Enhances Disease MESHD in SARS-CoV-2 Infected Syrian Hamsters

    Authors: Rebecca Brocato; Lucia Principe; Robert Kimi; Xiankun Zeng; Janice Williams; Yanan Liu; Rong Li; Jeffrey Smith; Joseph Golden; Dave Gangemi; Sawsan Youssef; Zhongde Wang; Jacob Glanville; Jay W Hooper

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-43931/v1 Date: 2020-07-15 Source: ResearchSquare

    Animal models recapitulating human COVID-19 disease MESHD, especially with severe disease MESHD, are urgently needed to understand pathogenesis and evaluate candidate vaccines and therapeutics. Here, we develop novel severe disease animal models MESHD for COVID-19 involving disruption of adaptive immunity in Syrian hamsters. Cyclophosphamide (CyP) immunosuppressed or RAG2 knockout (KO) hamsters were exposed to SARS-CoV-2 by the respiratory route. Both the CyP-treated and RAG2 KO hamsters developed clinical signs of disease MESHD that were more severe than in immunocompetent hamsters, notably weight loss MESHD weight loss HP, viral loads, and fatality (RAG2 KO only). Disease MESHD was prolonged in transiently immunosuppressed hamsters and uniformly lethal in RAG2 KO hamsters. We evaluated the protective efficacy of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody SERO and found that pretreatment, even in immunosuppressed animals, limited infection MESHD. Our results suggest that functional B and/or T cells are not only important for the clearance of SARS-CoV-2, but also play an early role in protection from acute disease MESHD.

    Disruption of Adaptive Immunity Enhances Disease MESHD in SARS-CoV-2 Infected Syrian Hamsters

    Authors: Rebecca Brocato; Lucia Principe; Robert Kim; Xiankun Zeng; Janice Williams; Yanan Liu; Rong Li; Jeffrey Smith; Joseph Golden; Dave Gangemi; Sawsan Youssef; Zhongde Wang; Jacob Glanville; Jay Hooper

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.19.161612 Date: 2020-06-19 Source: bioRxiv

    Animal models recapitulating human COVID-19 disease MESHD, especially with severe disease MESHD, are urgently needed to understand pathogenesis and evaluate candidate vaccines and therapeutics. Here, we develop novel severe disease animal models MESHD for COVID-19 involving disruption of adaptive immunity in Syrian hamsters. Cyclophosphamide (CyP) immunosuppressed or RAG2 knockout (KO) hamsters were exposed to SARS-CoV-2 by the respiratory route. Both the CyP-treated and RAG2 KO hamsters developed clinical signs of disease MESHD that were more severe than in immunocompetent hamsters, notably weight loss MESHD weight loss HP, viral loads, and fatality (RAG2 KO only). Disease MESHD was prolonged in transiently immunosuppressed hamsters and uniformly lethal in RAG2 KO hamsters. We evaluated the protective efficacy of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody SERO and found that pretreatment, even in immunosuppressed animals, limited infection MESHD. Our results suggest that functional B and/or T cells are not only important for the clearance of SARS-CoV-2, but also play an early role in protection from acute disease MESHD. One Sentence SummaryAn antibody SERO targeting the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 limits infection MESHD in immunosuppressed Syrian hamster models.

    Pandemic Coronavirus Disease MESHD (COVID-19): Challenges and A Global Perspective

    Authors: Yashpal Singh Malik; Naveen Kumar; Shubhankar Sircar; Rahul Kaushik; Sudipta Bhatt; Kuldeep Dhama; Parakriti Gupta; Kapil Goyal; Mini P. Singh; Ujjala Ghoshal; Mohamed Ezzat Mahmoud El Zowalaty; O.R. Vinodh Kumar; Mohd. Iqbal Yatoo; Ruchi Tiwari; Mamta Pathak; Shailesh Kumar Patel; Ranjit Sah; Alfonso J. Rodriguez-Morales; Balasubramanian Ganesh; Prashant Kumar; Raj Kumar Singh

    id:10.20944/preprints202004.0469.v1 Date: 2020-04-26 Source: preprints.org

    The technology-driven world of the 21st century is currently confronted with a major threat to humankind in the form of the coronavirus disease MESHD (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). As of April 22, 2020, COVID-19 has claimed 169, 006 human lives and had spread to over 200 countries with more than 2,471,136 confirmed cases TRANS. The perpetually increasing figures associated with COVID-19 are disrupting the social and economic systems globally. The losses are unmatched and significantly higher compared to those from previously encountered pathogenic infections MESHD. Previously, two CoVs (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome MESHD-CoV) affected the human population in 2002 and 2012 in China and Saudi Arabia, respectively. Based on genomic similarities, animal-origin CoVs, primarily those infecting bats, civet cats, and pangolins, were presumed to be the source of emerging human CoVs, including the SARS-CoV-2. The cohesive approach amongst virologists, bioinformaticians, big data analysts, epidemiologists, and public health researchers across the globe has delivered high-end viral diagnostics. Similarly, vaccines and therapeutics against COVID-19 are currently in the pipeline for clinical trials. The rapidly evolving and popular technology of artificial intelligence played a major role in confirming and countering the COVID-19 pandemic using digital technologies and mathematical algorithms. In this review, we discuss the noteworthy advancements in the mitigation of the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on the etiological viral agent, comparative genomic analysis, population susceptibility, disease MESHD epidemiology, animal reservoirs, laboratory animal models, disease MESHD transmission TRANS, diagnosis using artificial intelligence interventions, therapeutics and vaccines, and disease MESHD mitigation measures to combat disease MESHD dissemination.

The ZB MED preprint Viewer preVIEW includes all COVID-19 related preprints from medRxiv and bioRxiv, from ChemRxiv, from ResearchSquare, from arXiv and from Preprints.org and is updated on a daily basis (7am CET/CEST).

Sources


Annotations

All
None
MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


Export subcorpus as Endnote

This service is developed in the project nfdi4health task force covid-19 which is a part of nfdi4health.

nfdi4health is one of the funded consortia of the National Research Data Infrastructure programme of the DFG.