Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Pneumonia (451)

Fever (335)

Cough (265)

Hypertension (152)

Respiratory distress (139)


Transmission

age categories (1172)

Transmission (1150)

fomite (565)

gender (495)

asymptotic cases (457)


Seroprevalence
    displaying 31 - 40 records in total 5125
    records per page




    Proteinuria MESHD Proteinuria HP in COVID-19: prevalence SERO, characterization and prognostic role

    Authors: Justine Huart; Antoine Bouquegneau; Laurence Lutteri; Pauline Erpicum; Stéphanie Grosch; Guillaume Résimont; Patricia Wiesen; Christophe Bovy; Jean-Marie Krzesinski; Marie Thys; Bernard Lambermont; Benoit Misset; Hans Pottel; Christophe Mariat; Etienne Cavalier; Stéphane Burtey; François Jouret; Pierre Delanaye

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-57181/v1 Date: 2020-08-11 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Proteinuria MESHD Proteinuria HP has been commonly reported in patients with COVID-19, suggesting a renal involvement in this infection MESHD. However, only dipstick tests have been used thus far. Here, the quantification and characterization of proteinuria MESHD proteinuria HP and hematuria MESHD hematuria HP are investigated. Their potential association with mortality was assessed. Methods: This retrospective, observational and monocentric study includes 153 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between March 28th and April 30th 2020, in whom total proteinuria MESHD proteinuria HP and urine α1-microglobulin (a marker of tubular injury) have been measured. Association with mortality was evaluated with a follow-up until May 7th 2020. Results: According to the Kidney Disease MESHD Improving Global Outcomes staging, 14% (n=21) had stage 1 proteinuria MESHD proteinuria HP (<150 mg/g of urine creatinine), 42% (n=64) had stage 2 (between 150 and 500 mg/g) and 44% (n=68) had stage 3 (over 500 mg/g). Urine α1-microglobulin concentration was higher than 10 or 15 mg/g in 94% and 89% of patients, respectively. After a median follow-up of 27 [14;30] days, the mortality rate reached 18%. Total proteinuria MESHD proteinuria HP and urine α1-microglobulin (as continuous and/or categorical variables) were associated with mortality in unadjusted and adjusted models. This association was even stronger in subgroups of patients with normal renal function or without urinary catheter. Conclusions: Proteinuria MESHD Proteinuria HP is frequent in patients with COVID-19. Its characterization suggests a tubular origin with increased urine α1-microglobulin. Tubular proteinuria MESHD proteinuria HP seems associated with mortality in COVID-19.

    Cardiac involvement in COVID-19 patients: mid-term follow up by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Authors: Hui Wang; Ruili Li; Hong Jiang; Zixu Yan; Xinyan Tao; Hongjun Li; Lei Xu

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-57104/v1 Date: 2020-08-11 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) induces myocardial injury, either direct myocarditis MESHD myocarditis HP or indirect injury due to systemic inflammatory response. Myocardial involvement has been proved to be one of the primary manifestations of COVID-19 infection MESHD, according to laboratory test, autopsy, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). However, the middle-term outcome of cardiac involvement after the patients were discharged from the hospital is yet unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate mid-term cardiac sequelae in recovered COVID-19 patients by CMRIMethods: A total of 47 recovered COVID-19 patients were prospectively recruited and underwent CMRI examination in this study. The CMRI protocol consisted of black blood SERO fat-suppressed T2 weighted imaging (BB-T2WI), T2 star mapping, left ventricle cine imaging, pre- and post-contrast T1 mapping, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Myocardium edema MESHD edema HP and LGE were assessed in recovered COVID-19 patients. The left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) function and LV mass were assessed and compared with normal controls.Results: Finally, 44 recovered COVID-19 patients and 31 normal controls were included in this study. No edema MESHD edema HP was observed in any patient. LGE was found in 13 patients. All LGE lesions were located in the middle myocardium and/or sub-epicardium with a scattered distribution. Further analysis showed that LGE-positive patients had significantly decreased left ventricle peak global circumferential strain (LVpGCS), right ventricle peak global circumferential strain (RVpGCS), right ventricle peak global longitudinal strain (RVpGLS) as compared to non-LGE patients (p<0.05), while no difference was detected between the non-LGE patients and normal controls.Conclusion: Myocardium injury existed in about 30% of COVID-19 patients. These patients had peak right ventricle strain that decreased at the 3-month follow-up. Cardiac MRI can monitor the COVID-19-induced myocarditis MESHD myocarditis HP progression, and CMR strain analysis is a sensitive tool to evaluate the recovery of left ventricle circumferential contraction dysfunction and right ventricular MESHD dysfunction.

    An ultra-high affinity synthetic nanobody blocks SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD by locking Spike into an inactive conformation

    Authors: Michael Schoof; Bryan Faust; Reuben A Saunders; Smriti Sangwan; Veronica V Rezelj; Nick Hoppe; Morgane Boone; Christian Billesboelle; Marcell Zimanyi; Ishan Deshpande; Jiahao Liang; Aditya A Anand; Niv Dobzinski; Beth Shoshana Zha; Benjamin Barsi-Rhyne; Vladislav Bleyy; Andrew W Barile-Hill; Sayan Gupta; Camille R. Simoneau; Kristoffer Leon; Kris M. White; Silke Nock; Yuwei Liu; Nevan J. Krogan; Corie Y Ralston; Danielle L Swaney; Adolfo Garcia-Sastre; Melanie Ott; Marco Vignuzzi; - Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) Coronavirus Research Group Structural Biology Consortium; Peter Walter; Aashish Manglik

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.08.238469 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: bioRxiv

    Without an effective prophylactic solution, infections MESHD from SARS-CoV-2 continue to rise worldwide with devastating health and economic costs. SARS-CoV-2 gains entry into host cells via an interaction between its Spike protein and the host cell receptor angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Disruption of this interaction confers potent neutralization of viral entry, providing an avenue for vaccine design and for therapeutic antibodies SERO. Here, we develop single-domain antibodies SERO (nanobodies) that potently disrupt the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 Spike and ACE2. By screening a yeast surface-displayed library of synthetic nanobody sequences, we identified a panel of nanobodies that bind to multiple epitopes on Spike and block ACE2 interaction via two distinct mechanisms. Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) revealed that one exceptionally stable nanobody, Nb6, binds Spike in a fully inactive conformation with its receptor binding domains (RBDs) locked into their inaccessible down-state, incapable of binding ACE2. Affinity maturation and structure-guided design of multivalency yielded a trivalent nanobody, mNb6-tri, with femtomolar affinity for SARS-CoV-2 Spike and picomolar neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. mNb6-tri retains stability and function after aerosolization, lyophilization, and heat treatment. These properties may enable aerosol-mediated delivery of this potent neutralizer directly to the airway epithelia, promising to yield a widely deployable, patient-friendly prophylactic and/or early infection MESHD therapeutic agent to stem the worst pandemic in a century.

    DC/L-SIGN recognition of spike glycoprotein promotes SARS-CoV-2 trans- infection MESHD and can be inhibited by a glycomimetic antagonist

    Authors: Michel Thepaut; Joanna Luczkowiak; Corinne Vives; Nuria Labiod; Isabelle Bally; Fatima Lasala; Yasmina Grimoire; Daphna Fenel; Sara Sattin; Nicole Thielens; Guy Schoehn; Anna Bernardi; Rafael Delgado; Franck Fieschi

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.09.242917 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: bioRxiv

    The efficient spread of SARS-CoV-2 resulted in a pandemic that is unique in modern history. Despite early identification of ACE2 as the receptor for viral spike protein, much remains to be understood about the molecular events behind viral dissemination. We evaluated the contribution of C-type lectin receptors (CLRS) of antigen-presenting cells, widely present in air mucosa and lung tissue. DC-SIGN, L-SIGN, Langerin and MGL bind to diverse glycans of the spike using multiple interaction areas. Using pseudovirus and cells derived from monocytes or T-lymphocytes, we demonstrate that while virus capture by the CLRs examined does not allow direct cell infection MESHD, DC/L-SIGN, among these receptors, promote virus transfer to permissive ACE2+ cells. A glycomimetic compound designed against DC-SIGN, enable inhibition of this process. Thus, we described a mechanism potentiating viral capture and spreading of infection MESHD. Early involvement of APCs opens new avenues for understanding and treating the imbalanced innate immune response observed in COVID-19 pathogenesis.

    K18-hACE2 Mice for Studies of COVID-19 Treatments and Pathogenesis Including Anosmia HP

    Authors: Stanley Perlman; Jian Zheng; LOK YIN ROY WONG; Kun Li; Abhishek K Verma; Miguel E Ortiz Bezara; Christine Wohlford-Lenane; Mariah R. Leidinger; Michael C. Kundson; David K. Meyerholz; Paul B McCray Jr.

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.242073 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: bioRxiv

    The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. While much has been learned in the first months of the pandemic, many features of COVID-19 pathogenesis remain to be determined. For example, anosmia HP is a common presentation and many patients with this finding show no or only minor respiratory signs. Studies in animals experimentally infected with SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, provide opportunities to study aspects of the disease MESHD not easily investigated in human patients. COVID-19 severity ranges from asymptomatic TRANS to lethal. Most experimental infections MESHD provide insights into mild disease MESHD. Here, using K18-hACE2 mice that we originally developed for SARS studies, we show that infection MESHD with SARS-CoV-2 causes severe disease in the lung MESHD, and in some mice, the brain. Evidence of thrombosis MESHD and vasculitis MESHD vasculitis HP was detected in mice with severe pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP. Further, we show that infusion of convalescent plasma SERO (CP) from a recovered COVID-19 patient provided protection against lethal disease MESHD. Mice developed anosmia HP at early times after infection MESHD. Notably, while treatment with CP prevented significant clinical disease MESHD, it did not prevent anosmia HP. Thus K18-hACE2 mice provide a useful model for studying the pathological underpinnings of both mild and lethal COVID-19 and for assessing therapeutic interventions.

    Comparative analyses of SARS-CoV-2 binding (IgG, IgM, IgA) and neutralizing antibodies SERO from human serum samples SERO

    Authors: Livia Mazzini; Donata Martinuzzi; Inesa Hyseni; Giulia Lapini; Linda Benincasa; Pietro Piu; Claudia Maria Trombetta; Serena Marchi; Ilaria Razzano; Alessandro Manenti; Emanuele Montomoli

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.243717 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: bioRxiv

    A newly identified coronavirus, named SARS-CoV-2, emerged in December 2019 in Hubei Province, China, and quickly spread throughout the world; so far, it has caused more than 18 million cases of disease MESHD and 700,000 deaths MESHD. The diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is currently based on the detection of viral RNA in nasopharyngeal swabs by means of molecular-based assays, such as real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, serological assays SERO aimed at detecting different classes of antibodies SERO constitute the best surveillance strategy for gathering information on the humoral immune response to infection MESHD and the spread of the virus through the population, in order to evaluate the immunogenicity of novel future vaccines and medicines for the treatment and prevention of COVID-19 disease MESHD. The aim of this study was to determine SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO in human serum samples SERO by means of different commercial and in-house ELISA SERO kits, in order to evaluate and compare their results first with one another and then with those yielded by functional assays using wild-type virus. It is important to know the level of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies SERO in order to predict population immunity and possible cross-reactivity with other coronaviruses and to identify potentially infectious subjects. In addition, in a small sub-group of samples, we performed a subtyping Immunoglobulin G ELISA SERO. Our data showed an excellent statistical correlation between the neutralization titer and the IgG, IgM and IgA ELISA SERO response against the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein, confirming that antibodies SERO against this portion of the virus spike protein are highly neutralizing and that the ELISA SERO Receptor-Binding Domain-based assay can be used as a valid surrogate for the neutralization assay in laboratories which do not have Biosecurity level-3 facilities.

    Aggression in the workplace makes social distance difficult

    Authors: Keisuke Kokubun

    id:2008.04131v1 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: arXiv

    The spread of new coronavirus (COVID-19) infections MESHD continues to increase. The practice of social distance attracts attention as a measure to prevent the spread of infection MESHD, but it is difficult for some occupations. Therefore, in previous studies, the scale of factors that determine social distance has been developed. However, it was not clear how to select the items among them, and it seemed to be somewhat arbitrary. In response to this trend, this paper extracted eight scales by performing exploratory factor analysis based on certain rules while eliminating arbitrariness as much as possible. They were Adverse Conditions, Leadership, Information Processing, Response to Aggression, Mechanical Movement, Autonomy, Communication with the Outside, and Horizontal Teamwork. Of these, Adverse Conditions, Response to Aggression, and Horizontal Teamwork had a positive correlation with Physical Proximity, and Information Processing, Mechanical Movement, Autonomy, and Communication with the Outside had a negative correlation with Physical Proximity. Furthermore, as a result of multiple regression analysis, it was shown that Response to Aggression, not the mere teamwork assumed in previous studies, had the greatest influence on Physical Proximity.

    Aggression in the workplace makes social distance difficult

    Authors: Keisuke Kokubun

    id:2008.04131v2 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: arXiv

    The spread of new coronavirus (COVID-19) infections MESHD continues to increase. The practice of social distance attracts attention as a measure to prevent the spread of infection MESHD, but it is difficult for some occupations. Therefore, in previous studies, the scale of factors that determine social distance has been developed. However, it was not clear how to select the items among them, and it seemed to be somewhat arbitrary. In response to this trend, this paper extracted eight scales by performing exploratory factor analysis based on certain rules while eliminating arbitrariness as much as possible. They were Adverse Conditions, Leadership, Information Processing, Response to Aggression, Mechanical Movement, Autonomy, Communication with the Outside, and Horizontal Teamwork. Of these, Adverse Conditions, Response to Aggression, and Horizontal Teamwork had a positive correlation with Physical Proximity, and Information Processing, Mechanical Movement, Autonomy, and Communication with the Outside had a negative correlation with Physical Proximity. Furthermore, as a result of multiple regression analysis, it was shown that Response to Aggression, not the mere teamwork assumed in previous studies, had the greatest influence on Physical Proximity.

    Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 ORF6 deletion variants detected in a nosocomial cluster during routine genomic surveillance, Lyon, France

    Authors: Gregory Queromes; Gregory Destras; Antonin Bal; Hadrien Regue; Gwendolyne Burfin; Solenne Brun; Remi Fanget; Florence Morfin; Martine Valette; Bruno Lina; Emilie Frobert; Laurence Josset

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.07.241653 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: bioRxiv

    Through routine genomic surveillance of the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus (n=229 whole genome sequences), 2 different frameshifting deletions were newly detected in the open reading frame (ORF) 6, starting at the same position (27267). While the 26-nucleotide deletion variant was only found in one sample in March 2020, the 34-nucleotide deletion variant was found within a single geriatric hospital unit in 5/9 patients sequenced and one health care worker with samples collected between April 2nd and 9th, 2020. Both the presence of the 34-nucleotide deletion variant limited to this unit and the clustering of the corresponding whole genome sequences by phylogeny analysis strongly suggested a nosocomial transmission TRANS between patients. Interestingly, prolonged viral excretion of the 34-nucleotide deletion variant was identified in a stool sample 14 days after initial diagnosis for one patient. Clinical data revealed no significant difference in disease MESHD severity between patients harboring the wild-type or the 34-nucleotide deletion variants. The in vitro infection MESHD of the two deletion variants on primate endothelial kidney cells (BGM) and human lung adenocarcinoma MESHD lung adenocarcinoma HP cells (Calu-3) yielded comparable replication kinetics with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, high viral loads were found in vivo regardless of the presence or absence of the ORF6 deletion. Our study highlights the transmission TRANS and replication capacity of two newly described deletion variants in the same ORF6 region.

    Has Ivermectin Virus-Directed Effects against SARS-CoV-2? Rationalizing the Action of a Potential Multitarget Antiviral Agent

    Authors: Antonio Francés-Monerris; Cristina Garcia-Iriepa; Isabel Iriepa; Cecilia Hognon; Tom Miclot; Giampaolo Barone; Antonio Monari; Marco Marazzi

    doi:10.26434/chemrxiv.12782258.v1 Date: 2020-08-10 Source: ChemRxiv

    The novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus is causing a devastating pandemic in 2020, threatening public health in many countries. An unprecedented rapid and global response has been set in motion to identify efficient antiviral agents against SARS-CoV-2, mostly relying on the repurposing of drugs presenting or not previously known antiviral activity. Ivermectin is an approved drug used as antiparasitic in humans and animals with well documented broad-spectrum antiviral properties that emerge from host-directed effects. Recent results reported by Wagstaff and coworkers (Antiviral Research 2020, 178, 104787) show a potent inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro by ivermectin, and clinical trials with human volunteers have already started. However, the mode of action of ivermectin is still largely unknown, especially at the molecular level. Here, we employ advanced molecular dynamics simulations to assess the influence of ivermectin on several key viral protein targets, with the aim to reveal the molecular bases of antiviral mechanisms against SARS-CoV-2. Interestingly, we show that ivermectin could be regarded as a multitarget agent, inhibiting different viral functions. These include blocking the recognition by the SARS-CoV-2 Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) of the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), the interactions with the two viral proteases 3CLpro and PLpro, and the SARS Unique Domain (SUD) non-structural protein. Hence, the wide spectrum of actions involving i) the interference with cell infection MESHD, ii) the inhibition of viral replication, and iii) elusion of the host immune system, could point to an unprecedented synergy between host- and virus-directed effects explaining the high anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity observed for this compound.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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