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Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Hepatitis (1)


Transmission

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Seroprevalence
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    Humidity and deposition solution play a critical role in virus inactivation by heat treatment on N95 respirators

    Authors: Nicole Rockey; Peter J. Arts; Lucinda Li; Katherine R. Harrison; Kathryn Langenfeld; William J. Fitzsimmons; Adam S. Lauring; Nancy G. Love; Keith S. Kaye; Lutgarde Raskin; William W. Roberts; Bridget Hegarty; Krista R. Wigginton

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.22.20137448 Date: 2020-06-23 Source: medRxiv

    Supply shortages of N95 respirators during the coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have motivated institutions to develop feasible and effective N95 respirator reuse strategies. In particular, heat decontamination is a treatment method that scales well and can be implemented in settings with variable or limited resources. Prior studies using multiple inactivation methods, however, have often focused on a single virus under narrowly defined conditions, making it difficult to develop guiding principles for inactivating emerging or difficult-to-culture viruses. We systematically explored how temperature, humidity, and virus deposition solutions impact the inactivation of viruses deposited and dried on N95 respirator coupons. We exposed four virus surrogates across a range of structures and phylogenies, including two bacteriophages (MS2 and phi6), a mouse coronavirus (murine hepatitis MESHD hepatitis MESHD hepatitis HP virus, MHV), and a recombinant human influenza MESHD A virus subtype H3N2 (IAV), to heat treatment for 30 minutes in multiple deposition solutions across several temperatures and relative humidities (RH). We observed that elevated RH was essential for effective heat inactivation of all four viruses tested. For heat treatments between 72{degrees}C and 82{degrees}C, RH greater than 50% resulted in > 6-log10 inactivation of bacteriophages and RH greater than 25% resulted in > 3.5-log10 inactivation of MHV and IAV. Furthermore, deposition of viruses in host cell culture media greatly enhanced virus inactivation by heat and humidity compared to other deposition solutions such as phosphate buffered saline, phosphate buffered saline with bovine serum SERO albumin, and human saliva. Past and future heat treatment methods or technologies must therefore explicitly account for deposition solutions as a factor that will strongly influence observed virus inactivation rates. Overall, our data set can inform the design and validation of effective heat-based decontamination strategies for N95 respirators and other porous surfaces, especially for emerging or low-titer viruses that may be of immediate public health concern such as SARS-CoV-2.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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