displaying 1 - 4 records in total 4
    records per page




    Blood SERO Type Distribution in Autoimmune Diseases MESHD: An Anonymous, Large-Scale, Self-Report Pilot Study

    Authors: Edward S Harris; Harlan D Harris; Miroslav Malkovsky

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-75388/v1 Date: 2020-09-10 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Recent research has verified that blood SERO group or Rh factor can influence susceptibility to various cardiovascular, neoplastic and infectious diseases MESHD including COVID-19. While a number of studies have looked at correlations between blood SERO group and various rheumatological diseases MESHD, findings have been inconsistent, often because many of these studies suffered from small sample size issues. In order to better understand the potential relationships between blood SERO group/Rh factor and rheumatological diseases MESHD, we performed a large-scale self-report pilot study of blood SERO type distributions in five autoimmune diseases MESHD.Methods: Five autoimmune diseases MESHD were included in the study: systemic sclerosis MESHD, systemic lupus erythematosus HP systemic lupus erythematosus MESHD, rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD, psoriasis MESHD, and ankylosing spondylitis MESHD. We also included a control group in which participants did not have any autoimmune diseases MESHD.  The participants were recruited through social media and organizations such as the Lupus Foundation and the National Psoriasis Foundation. Respondents who met the inclusion criteria were asked only two questions by anonymous survey: blood SERO type and country of birth.Results: Each autoimmune disorder MESHD group included between 570 and 951 US participants. While there was little difference in blood SERO type distribution patterns among the five diseases, unexpectedly, all five disease groups showed a consistent pattern where Rh negative was almost twice as high as US population norms. A post-hoc non-autoimmune control group was added in order to determine if this anomalous finding was an artifact of the study design. The control group displayed a similar unexpected increase in the Rh-negative blood SERO type prevalence SERO, suggesting that the very high Rh-negative frequency among the tested disease groups was likely to be an artifact of the study design. Conclusions: Overall, our preliminary study results show no meaningful differences between the disease groups and the post-hoc control group, suggesting that neither ABO type nor Rh factor affects susceptibility to the development of any of the five studied autoimmune diseases MESHD. Nevertheless, the unexpected observed difference in Rh factor distribution between the studied groups/control group and the corresponding US population norms has important implications for any research study using self-selected subjects.  Our results suggest that such studies may be subject to unanticipated biases, requiring meticulous controls to confirm impartiality and exclude any artifacts of the study design.

    Association between autoimmune diseases MESHD and COVID-19 as assessed in both a test-negative case-control and population case-control design

    Authors: Rossella Murtas; Anita Andreano; Federico Gervasi; Davide Guido; David Consolazio; Sara Tunesi; Laura Andreoni; Maria Teresa Greco; Maria Elena Gattoni; Monica Sandrini; Antonio Riussi; Antonio Giampiero Russo

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-58948/v1 Date: 2020-08-13 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: COVID-19 epidemic has paralleled with the so called infodemic, where countless pieces of information have been disseminated on putative risk factors for COVID-19. Among those, emerged the notion that people suffering from autoimmune diseases MESHD ( AIDs MESHD) have a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Methods: The cohort included all COVID-19 cases residents in the Agency for Health Protection (AHP) of Milan that, from the beginning of the outbreak, developed a web-based platform that traced TRANS positive and negative cases as well as related contacts. AIDs MESHD subjects were defined ad having one the following autoimmune disease MESHD: rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD, systemic lupus erythematosus HP systemic lupus erythematosus MESHD, systemic sclerosis MESHD, Sjogren disease, ankylosing spondylitis MESHD, myasthenia gravis MESHD, Hashimoto's disease MESHD, acquired autoimmune hemolytic anemia HP autoimmune hemolytic anemia MESHD, and psoriatic arthritis MESHD arthritis HP. To investigate whether AID subjects are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, and whether they have worse prognosis than AIDs MESHD-free subjects once infected, we performed a combined analysis of a test-negative design case-control study, a case-control with test-positive as cases, and one with test-negative as cases (CC-NEG). Results: During the outbreak, the Milan AHP endured, up to April 27th 2020, 20,364 test-positive and 34,697 test-negative subjects. We found no association between AIDs MESHD and being positive to COVID-19, but a statistically significant association between AIDs MESHD and being negative to COVID-19 in the CC-NEG. If, as likely, test-negative subjects underwent testing because of respiratory infection MESHD symptoms, these results imply that autoimmune diseases MESHD may be a risk factor for respiratory infections MESHD in general (including COVID-19), but they are not a specific risk factor for COVID-19. Furthermore, when infected by SARS-CoV-2, AIDs MESHD subjects did not have a worse prognosis compared to non- AIDs MESHD subjects. Results highlighted a potential unbalance in the testing campaign, which may be correlated to the characteristics of the tested person, leading specific frail population to be particularly tested.Conclusions: Lack of availability of sound scientific knowledge inevitably lead unreliable news to spread over the population, preventing people to disentangle them form reliable information. Even if additional studies are needed to replicate and strengthen our results, these findings represent initial evidence to derive recommendations based on actual data for subjects with autoimmune diseases MESHD.

    Frequency and severity of Covid-19 in patients treated with biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) for inflammatory rheumatic disease MESHD. A case-control study

    Authors: Dr. Anne LOHSE; Dr. Marie BOSSERT; Dr. Ana-Maria BOZGAN; Charlotte BOURGOIN; Dr. Aline CHARPENTIER; Dr. Cerise GUILLOCHON; Dr. Julie KESSLER; Dr. Jean-Charles BALBLANC; Dr. Thierry CONROZIER

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-50490/v1 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: ResearchSquare

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact (frequency and severity) of Covid-19 on patients treated with biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) for inflammatory rheumatic disease MESHD and to compare it to a control group consisting of patients with musculoskeletal conditions MESHD not treated with bDMARDs.Patients and methods:A case control study in 200 outpatients with musculoskeletal conditions MESHD. 100 consecutive patients who have been treated with bDMARDs and 100 other consecutive patients who did not take bDMARDs were asked to complete a 15-item standardized questionnaire regarding demographic data. The following information was recorded: gender TRANS, age TRANS, weight, height, body mass index, professional activity, family status, total number of children TRANS and number of children TRANS under 18, rheumatic disease MESHD diagnosis, current treatment for rheumatism MESHD, type of containment, close contact TRANS with Covid-19 patients, Covid-19 symptoms, Covid-19 test result and hospitalization for Covid-19.Results:bDMARD patients mostly suffered from rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD, or RA MESHD, (47%) and ankylosing spondylitis MESHD (42%). The most prescribed bDMARDs were TNFα inhibitors (57%), IL-6 blockers (12%) and JAK inhibitors (11%). The mean duration of the current biological treatment was 38.6 months. Patients from the control group were suffering chiefly from osteoarthritis HP osteoarthritis MESHD (45%) and RA MESHD (21%). Compared to the control group, patients treated with bDMARDs were 10 years younger (p<0.001), fewer were retired (56% versus 31%) and more were on sick or incapacity leave (6% versus 18%). During lockdown, they were more likely to be working from home or working short term (27% versus 9%). 18 patients from the bDMARDs group stopped biological treatment: one because of Covid-19 evidenced by PCR, 11 because of symptoms suggesting Covid- 19 and only six from fear of contracting the disease. 12 patients, including the one Sars-CoV-2 +, resumed their treatment after a few weeks of interruption. There was no severe Covid-19 infection MESHD in the bDMARDs group. Among the three patients from the control group who had contracted Covid-19, one developed a very severe disease.Conclusion :This case-control study did not show an increase in the frequency or severity of Covid-19 in subjects suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatism MESHD treated with biotherapies. Larger-scale studies are necessary before affirming that biologics do not expose patients to an increased risk of disease and complications.

    Does Biological Therapy Protect against Severe COVID-19?

    Authors: Ramon Mazzucchelli; Raquel Almodovar-Gonzalez; Natalia Crespi-Villarias; Elena Garcia-Zamora; Elia Perez-Fernandez; Javier Quiros-Donate; Monserrat Perez-Encinas; Patricia Sanmartin-Fenollera; Maria Velasco-Arribas; Pilar Lopez-Serrano; Jose lazaro Perez-Calle; Conrado Fernandez-Rodriguez; Jose Luis Lopez-Estebaranz; Pedro Zarco-Montejo

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.21.20136788 Date: 2020-06-24 Source: medRxiv

    Objective. To estimate COVID-19 infection MESHD incidence rate with severe affectation MESHD (requiring hospitalization) in patients with biological treatment due to rheumatoid arthritis HP rheumatoid arthritis MESHD ( RA MESHD), psoriatic arthritis MESHD arthritis HP ( PsA MESHD), spondyloarthritis MESHD ( SpA MESHD), psoriasis MESHD ( Ps MESHD), and inflammatory bowel disease MESHD ( IBD MESHD) and compare it with incidence rate in the general population. Methods: Retrospective observational study based on information provided by two administrative databases. One of these two databases contains information on all patients seen in our hospital and diagnosed with COVID-19 infection between March 4th 2020 and April 26th 2020. The other database contains data from patients seen at Rheumatology, Dermatology and Digestive Departments in our hospital who are currently receiving biological therapy. We calculated the crude and age TRANS and sex adjusted incidence in both groups. To compare both groups we calculated the Incidence Rate Ratio. Results: There was a total of 2,182 patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Four patients out of a total of 797 patients receiving biological therapy had contracted COVID-19 and required hospital care. Crude incidence rate of COVID-19 requiring hospital care among the general population was 1.41%, and it was 0.50% among the group receiving biological therapy. Rates adjusted by age TRANS and sex in the biological group was 0.45% (CI95% 0.11-4.13). The IRR of the group receiving biological therapy compared to the general population was 0.39 (CI95% 0.14-1, p=0.049). Conclusion: Findings suggest that prior use of biological therapy does not associate with severe manifestations of COVID-19, and it is likely to have a protective effect against them when compared to the general population.

The ZB MED preprint Viewer preVIEW includes all COVID-19 related preprints from medRxiv and bioRxiv, from ChemRxiv, from ResearchSquare, from arXiv and from Preprints.org and is updated on a daily basis (7am CET/CEST).
The web page can also be accessed via API.

Sources


Annotations

All
None
MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


Export subcorpus as...

This service is developed in the project nfdi4health task force covid-19 which is a part of nfdi4health.

nfdi4health is one of the funded consortia of the National Research Data Infrastructure programme of the DFG.