Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Transmission

Seroprevalence
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    Gastrointestinal disturbance and effect of fecal microbiota transplantation in discharged COVID-19 patients

    Authors: Zhaoqun Deng; Fengqiong Liu; Shanliang Ye; Xin Zhu; Xuesong He; Shengzhou Wang; Yinbao Li; Jiang Lin; Jingsu Wang; Yonggan Lin; Xin Ren; Yong Li

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-54135/v1 Date: 2020-08-05 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: Gastrointestinal manifestations and gut dysbiosis MESHD are prevalent after SARS-CoV2 infection MESHD.With the continuously increasing number of infected cases, more attention should be paid to this particular population in post- infection MESHD recovery.cWe aimed to investigate the potential beneficial effect of FMT on gastrointestinal symptoms, gut dysbiosis MESHD and immune status in discharged COVID-19 patients. Results: Gastrointestinal and psychological disorder (45.5%) were observed in COVID-19 patients during post- infection MESHD recovery, improvement of which were observed after FMT. Most of the lab results including blood SERO routine and blood SERO biochemistry, within the normal range. The general distribution of 69 different types of lymphocytes differed between before and after FMT. FMT exert significant effect on B cells which was characterized as decreased naive B cell ( P =0.012) and increased memory B cells ( P = 0.001) and non-switched B cells ( P = 0.012).The microbial community richness indicated by OTUs number, observed species and Chao1 estimators was marginally increased after FMT, whereas the community diversity estimated by the Shannon and Simpson index showed no significant changes after FMT. Gut microbiome composition of discharged COVID-19 patients differed from that of the general population at both phylum and genera level, which was characterized with a lower proportion of Firmicutes (41.0%) and Actinobacteria (4.0%), higher proportion of Bacteroidetes (42.9%) and Proteobacteriato (9.2%). FMT can partially restore the gutdysbiosis by increasing the relative abundance of Actinobacteria (15.0%) and reducing Proteobacteriato (2.8%) at the phylum level. At the genera level, Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium , which were dominant genera in the human gut microbiota and were beneficial for human health, had significantly increased after FMT. Conclusions: Gastrointestinal and gut dysbiosis MESHD were observed in COVID-19 patients during post- infection MESHD recovery. FMT can improve the immune functionality, restore the gut microbiota, alleviate gastrointestinal disorders, and may serve as a potential therapeutic and rehabilitative intervention for the COVID-19.

    Temporal dynamics of human respiratory and gut microbiomes during the course of COVID-19 in adults TRANS

    Authors: Rong Xu; Renfei Lu; Tao Zhang; Qunfu Wu; Weihua Cai; Xudong Han; Xia Jin; Zhigang Zhang; Chiyu Zhang; Zhenzhou Wan

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.21.20158758 Date: 2020-07-22 Source: medRxiv

    SARS-CoV-2 infects multiple organs including the respiratory tract and gut. Whether regional microbiomes are disturbed significantly to affect the disease progression MESHD of COVID-19 is largely unknown. To address this question, we performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of throat and anal swabs from 35 COVID-19 adults TRANS and 15 controls by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results allowed a partitioning of patients into 3-4 categories (I-IV) with distinct microbial community types in both sites. Lower-diversity community types often appeared in the early phase of COVID-19, and synchronous fast restoration of both the respiratory and gut microbiomes from early dysbiosis MESHD towards late near-normal was observed in 6/8 mild COVID-19 adult TRANS patients despite they had a relatively slow clinical recovery. The synchronous shift of the community types was associated with significantly positive bacterial interactions between the respiratory tract and gut, possibly along the airway-gut axis. These findings reveal previously unknown interactions between respiratory and gut microbiomes, and suggest that modulations of regional microbiota might help to improve the recovery from COVID-19 in adult TRANS patients.

    Progressive worsening of the respiratory and gut microbiome in children TRANS during the first two months of COVID-19

    Authors: Rong Xu; Pengcheng Liu; Tao Zhang; Qunfu Wu; Mei Zeng; Yingying Ma; Xia Jin; Jin Xu; Zhigang Zhang; Chiyu Zhang

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.13.20152181 Date: 2020-07-17 Source: medRxiv

    Children TRANS are less susceptible to COVID-19 and manifests lower morbidity and mortality after infection MESHD, for which a multitude of mechanisms may be proposed. Whether the normal development of gut-airway microbiome is affected by COVID-19 has not been evaluated. We demonstrate that COVID-19 alters the respiratory and gut microbiome of children TRANS. Alteration of the microbiome was divergent between the respiratory tract and gut, albeit the dysbiosis MESHD was dominated by genus Pseudomonas and sustained for up to 25-58 days in different individuals. The respiratory microbiome distortion persisted in 7/8 children TRANS for at least 19-24 days after discharge from the hospital. The gut microbiota showed early dysbiosis MESHD towards later restoration in some children TRANS, but not others. Disturbed development of both gut and respiratory microbiomes, and prolonged respiratory dysbiosis MESHD in children TRANS imply possible long-term complications after clinical recovery from COVID-19, such as predisposition to an increased health risk in the post-COVID-19 era.

    Progressive worsening of the respiratory and gut microbiome in children TRANS during the first two months of COVID-19

    Authors: Rong Xu; Pengcheng Liu; Tao Zhang; Qunfu Wu; Mei Zeng; Yingying Ma; Xia Jin; Jin Xu; Zhigang Zhang; Chiyu Zhang

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-44158/v1 Date: 2020-07-16 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background Children TRANS are less susceptible to COVID-19 and manifests lower morbidity and mortality after infection MESHD, for which a multitude of mechanisms may be proposed. Whether the normal development of gut-airway microbiome is affected by COVID-19 has not been evaluated.Results We demonstrate that COVID-19 alters the respiratory and gut microbiome of children TRANS. Alteration of the microbiome was divergent between the respiratory tract and gut, albeit the dysbiosis MESHD was dominated by genus Pseudomonas and sustained for up to 25–58 days in different individuals. The respiratory microbiome distortion persisted in 7/8 children TRANS for at least 19–24 days after discharge from the hospital. The gut microbiota showed early dysbiosis MESHD towards later restoration in some children TRANS, but not others.Conclusions Disturbed development of both gut and respiratory microbiomes, and prolonged respiratory dysbiosis MESHD in children TRANS imply possible long-term complications after clinical recovery from COVID-19, such as predisposition to an increased health risk in the post-COVID-19 era.

    Secondary pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP in critically ill ventilated patients with COVID-19

    Authors: Mailis Maes; Ellen Higginson; Joana Pereira Dias; Martin D Curran; Surendra Parmar; Fahad Khokhar; Delphine Cuchet-Lourenço; Janine Lux; Sapna Sharma-Hajela; Benjamin Ravenhill; Razeen Mahroof; Amelia Solderholm; Sally Forrest; Sushmita Sridhar; Nicholas M Brown; Stephen Baker; Vilas Navapurkar; Gordon Dougan; Josefin Bartholdson Scott; Andrew Conway Morris

    doi:10.1101/2020.06.26.20139873 Date: 2020-06-28 Source: medRxiv

    Background Pandemic COVID-19 caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has a high incidence of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD (SARS). Many of these patients require admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) for invasive artificial ventilation and are at significant risk of developing a secondary, ventilator-associated pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP (VAP). Objectives To study the incidence of VAP, as well as differences in secondary infections, and bacterial MESHD lung microbiome composition of ventilated COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients. Methods In this prospective observational study, we compared the incidence of VAP and secondary infections MESHD using a combination of a TaqMan multi-pathogen array and microbial culture. In addition, we determined the lung microbime composition using 16S RNA analyisis. The study involved eighteen COVID-19 and seven non-COVID-19 patients receiving invasive ventilation in three ICUs located in a single University teaching hospital between April 13th 2020 and May 7th 2020. Results We observed a higher percentage of confirmed VAP in COVID-19 patients. However, there was no statistical difference in the detected organisms or pulmonary microbiome when compared to non-COVID-19 patients. Conclusion COVID-19 makes people more susceptible to developing VAP, partly but not entirely due to the increased duration of ventilation. The pulmonary dysbiosis MESHD caused by COVID-19, and the array of secondary infections MESHD observed are similar to that seen in critically ill patients ventilated for other reasons.

    Gut mycobiota alterations in patients with COVID-19 and H1N1 and associations with immune and gastrointestinal symptoms

    Authors: Longxian Lv; Silan Gu; Huiyong Jiang; Ren Yan; Yanfei Chen; Yunbo chen; Rui Luo; Chenjie Huang; Haifeng Lu; Beiwen Zheng; Hua Zhang; Jiafeng Xia; Lingling Tang; Guoping Sheng; Lanjuan Li

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-33152/v1 Date: 2020-06-02 Source: ResearchSquare

    The relationship between gut microbes and COVID-19 or H1N1 flu is not fully understood. Here, we compared gut mycobiota of 67 COVID-19 patients, 35 H1N1 patients and 48 healthy controls (HCs) using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 3-ITS4 sequencing. Fungal richness decreased in COVID-19 and H1N1 patients compared to HCs, but fungal diversity decreased in only H1N1 patients. Fungal mycobiota dysbiosis MESHD in both COVID-19 and H1N1 patients was mainly characterized by depletions of fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, but several fungi, such as Candida parapsilosis, and Malassezia yamatoensis, were enriched in H1N1 patients. The altered fungal taxa were strongly associated with clinical features such as the incidence of diarrhoea, albumin. Gut mycobiota between COVID-19 patients with mild and severity symptoms are not different, as well as between COVID-19 patients in and out hospital. Therefore, gut mycobiota dysbiosis MESHD occur in covid-19 or H1N1 patients and do not improve until discharge.

    Immunodepletion with Hypoxemia HP: A Potential High Risk Subtype of Coronavirus Disease MESHD 2019

    Authors: Lilei Yu; Yongqing Tong; Gaigai Shen; Aisi Fu; Yanqiu Lai; Xiaoya Zhou; Yuan Yuan; Yuhong Wang; Yuchen Pan; Zhiyao Yu; Yan Li; Tiangang Liu; Hong Jiang

    doi:10.1101/2020.03.03.20030650 Date: 2020-03-06 Source: medRxiv

    Background The outbreak of COVID-2019 is becoming a global public health emergency MESHD. Although its basic clinical features have been reported, the dynamic characteristics of immune system in COVID-2019 patients, especially those critical patients with refractory hypoxemia HP, are not yet well understood. We aim to describe the dynamic characteristics of immune system in 3 critical patients with refractory hypoxemia HP, and discuss the relationship between hypoxemia HP severity and immune cell levels, and the changes of gut microbes of COVID-2019 patient. Methods This is a retrospective study from 3 patients with 2019-nCoV infection MESHD admitted to Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, a COVID-2019 designated hospital in Wuhan, from January 31 to February 6, 2020. All patients were diagnosed and classified based on the Diagnosis and Treatment of New Coronavirus Pneumonia MESHD Pneumonia HP (6th edition) published by the National Health Commission of China4. We recorded the epidemiological history, demographic features, clinical characteristics, symptoms and signs MESHD, treatment and clinical outcome in detail. Blood SERO samples were collected and we determined the expression levels of immune cells (CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells, and CD16+56+ NK cells) in different time points. Nanopore Targeted Sequencing was used to determine the alterations of gut microbiota homeostasis. Results Apart from the clinical features described previously4, we found that four patients had decreased immune cells and refractory hypoxemia HP during the hospitalization, and the severity of hypoxemia HP was strongly correlated to the expression levels of immune cells. Additionally, we found that the proportion of probiotics was significantly reduced, such as Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, and Eubacterium, and the proportion of conditioned pathogenic bacteria was significantly increased, such as Corynebacterium of Actinobacteria and Ruthenibacterium of Firmicutes. Notably, all patients died. Conclusions We discussed the dynamic characteristics of host immune system and the imbalance of gut microbiota in 3 critical patients with COVID-2019. Hypoxemia HP severity was closely related with host immune cell levels, and the vicious circle between immune disorder and gut microbiota imbalance may be a high risk of fatal pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which revealing that immunodepletion with refractory hypoxemia HP is a potential high risk subtype of COVID-2019 and the vicious circle between immune disorder and gut dysbiosis MESHD may be a high risk of fatal pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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