Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Human Phenotype

Pneumonia (48)

Fever (42)

Cough (21)

Respiratory distress (15)

Anosmia (12)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 41 - 50 records in total 866
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    Neutralizing antibody SERO against SARS-CoV-2 spike in COVID-19 patients, health care workers and convalescent plasma SERO donors: a cohort study using a rapid and sensitive high-throughput neutralization assay

    Authors: Cong Zeng; John P Evans; Rebecca Pearson; Panke Qu; Yi-Min Zheng; Richard T Robinson; Luanne Hall-Stoodley; Jacob Yount; Sonal Pannu; Rama K Mallampalli; Linda Saif; Eugene Oltz; Gerard Lozanski; Shan-Lu Liu

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.02.20166819 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Rapid and specific antibody testing SERO is crucial for improved understanding, control, and treatment of COVID-19 pathogenesis. Herein, we describe and apply a rapid, sensitive, and accurate virus neutralization assay for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The new assay is based on an HIV-1 lentiviral vector that contains a secreted intron Gaussia luciferase or secreted Nano-luciferase reporter cassette, pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein, and is validated with a plaque reduction assay using an authentic, infectious SARS-CoV-2 strain. The new assay was used to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in serum SERO from individuals with a broad range of COVID-19 symptoms, including intensive care unit (ICU) patients, health care workers (HCWs), and convalescent plasma SERO donors. The highest neutralizing antibody SERO titers were observed among ICU patients, followed by general hospitalized patients, HCWs and convalescent plasma SERO donors. Our study highlights a wide phenotypic variation in human antibody SERO responses against SARS-CoV-2, and demonstrates the efficacy of a novel lentivirus pseudotype assay for high-throughput serological surveys of neutralizing antibody SERO titers in large cohorts.

    Assessment of a Laboratory-Based SARS-CoV-2 Antibody SERO Test Among Hemodialysis Patients: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    Authors: Dena E Cohen; Gilbert Marlowe; Gabriel Contreras; Marie Ann Sosa; Jair Munoz Mendoza; Oliver Lenz; Zain Mithani; Pura Margarita Teixeiro; Nery Queija; Araceli Moneda; Jean S Jeanty; Katherine Swanzy; Misha Palecek; Mahesh Krishnan; Jeffery Giullian; Steven M Brunelli

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20163642 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction: The coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID -19) pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS -CoV -2) infection MESHD. Although tests to detect anti - SARS -CoV-2 antibodies SERO have been developed, their sensitivity SERO and specificity in hemodialysis patients have not been previously assessed. Methods: As part of a quality improvement (QI) initiative, nasopharyngeal swabs and predialysis blood SERO samples were collected on the same day from adult TRANS patients receiving routine hemodialysis care at clinics managed by a large dialysis organization in the greater Miami, Florida region (23 - 30 Apr 2020). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for SARS -CoV -2 and chemiluminescence immunoassays SERO for anti -SARS -CoV2 antibodies SERO were performed according to manufacturer-specified protocols. Results: Of 715 participants in the QI initiative, 38 had symptomatology consistent with COVID -19 prior to or during the initiative. Among these, COVID -19 was PCR -confirmed in 14 and ruled out in 20, with the remaining 4 being inconclusive. Among the 34 patients with known COVID -19 status, the sensitivity SERO and specificity of the antibody test SERO were 57.1% and 85.0% when either antibody SERO was considered. The remaining 677 patients had no record of symptoms consistent with COVID -19, nor any known exposure. Of these, 38 patients (5.6%) tested positive for anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. Conclusions: The operational characteristics of the laboratory-based antibody test SERO make it sufficient to rule in, but not rule out, SARS -CoV -2 infection MESHD in the appropriate clinical circumstance. A substantial proportion of dialysis patients may have had asymptomatic TRANS SARS -CoV -2 infection MESHD.

    Analytical and clinical performances SERO of five immunoassays SERO for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in comparison with neutralization activity

    Authors: Mario Plebani; Andrea Padoan; Laura Sciacovelli; Francesco Bonfante; Matteo Pagliari; Dania Bozzato; Chiara Cosma; Alessio Bortolami; Davide Negrini; Silvia Zuin

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.01.20166546 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background. Reliable high-throughput serological assays SERO for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO (Abs) are urgently needed for the effective containment of the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is of crucial importance to understand the strength and duration of immunity after infection MESHD, and to make informed decisions concerning the activation or discontinuation of physical distancing restrictions. Methods. In 184 serum samples SERO from 130 COVID-19 patients and 54 SARS-CoV-2 negative subjects, the analytical and clinical performances SERO of four commercially available chemiluminescent assays (Abbott SARS-Cov-2 IgG, Roche Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2, Ortho SARS-CoV-2 total and IgG) and one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO (Diesse ENZY-WELL SARS-CoV-2 IgG) were evaluated and compared with the neutralization activity achieved using the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Findings. Precision results ranged from 0.9% to 11.8% for all assays. Elecsys anti-SARS-CoV-2 demonstrated linearity of results at concentrations within the cut-off value. Overall, sensitivity SERO ranged from 78.5 to 87.8%, and specificity, from 97.6 to 100%. On limiting the analysis to samples collected 12 days after onset of symptoms TRANS, the sensitivity SERO of all assays increased, the highest value (95.2%) being obtained with VITRO Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Total and Architect SARS-CoV-2 IgG. The strongest PRNT50 correlation with antibody SERO levels was obtained with ENZY-Well SARS-CoV-2 IgG (rho = 0.541, p < 0.001). Interpretation. The results confirmed that all immunoassays SERO had an excellent specificity, whereas sensitivity SERO varied across immunoassays SERO, depending strongly on the time interval between symptoms onset TRANS and sample collection. Further studies should be conducted to achieve a stronger correlation between antibody SERO measurement and PRNT50 in order to obtain useful information for providing effective passive antibody SERO therapy, and developing a vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

    SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence SERO Across a Diverse Cohort of Healthcare Workers

    Authors: Joseph Ebinger; Gregory J. Botwin; Christine M. Albert; Mona Alotaibi; Moshe Arditi; Anders H. Berg; Aleksandra Binek; Patrick G. Botting; Justyna Fert-Bober; Jane C. Figueiredo; Jonathan D. Grein; Wohaib Hasan; Mir Henglin; Shehnaz K. Hussain; Mohit Jain; Sandy Joung; Michael Karin; Elizabeth H Kim; Dalin Li; Yunxian Liu; Eric Luong; Dermot P.B. McGovern; Akil Merchant; Noah M. Merin; Peggy B. Miles; Margo Minissian; Trevor-Trung Nguyen; Koen Raedschelders; Mohamad A. Rashid; Celine E. Riera; Richard V. Riggs; Sonia Sharma; Sarah Sternbach; Nancy Sun; Warren G. Tourtellotte; Jennifer E. Van Eyk; Kimia Sobhani; Jonathan G. Braun; Susan Cheng

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20163055 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Importance: Antibody testing SERO is important for understanding patterns of exposure and potential immunity to SARS-CoV-2. Prior data on seroprevalence SERO have been subject to variations in selection of individuals and nature as well as timing of testing in relation to exposures. Objective: We sought to determine the extent of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalance and the factors associated with seroprevelance across a diverse cohort of healthcare workers. Design: Observational cohort study of healthcare workers, including SARS-CoV-2 serology testing and participant questionaires. Participants: A diverse and unselected population of adults TRANS (n=6,062) employed in a multi-site healthcare delivery system located in Los Angeles County, including individuals with direct patient contact and others with non-patient-oriented work functions. Exposure: Exposure and infection MESHD with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as determined by seropositivity. Main Outcomes: Using Bayesian and multi-variate analyses, we estimated seroprevalence SERO and factors associated with seropositivity and antibody SERO titers, including pre-existing demographic and clinical characteristics; potential Covid-19 illness related exposures; and, symptoms consistent with Covid-19 infection MESHD. Results: We observed a seroprevalence SERO rate of 4.1%, with anosmia HP as the most prominently associated self-reported symptom in addition to fever MESHD fever HP, dry cough MESHD cough HP, anorexia MESHD anorexia HP, and myalgias MESHD myalgias HP. After adjusting for potential confounders, pre-existing medical conditions were not associated with antibody SERO positivity. However, seroprevalence SERO was associated with younger age TRANS, Hispanic ethnicity, and African-American race, as well as presence of either a personal or household member having a prior diagnosis of Covid-19. Importantly, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with antibody SERO positivity even after adjusting for personal Covid-19 diagnosis status, suggesting the contribution of unmeasured structural or societally factors. Notably, number of people, or children TRANS, in the home was not associated with antibody SERO positivity. Conclusion and Relevance: The demographic factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO among our healthcare workers underscore the importance of exposure sources beyond the workplace. The size and diversity of our study population, combined with robust survey and modeling techniques, provide a vibrant picture of the demographic factors, exposures, and symptoms that can identify individuals with susceptibility as well as potential to mount an immune response to Covid-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 antigens expressed in plants detect antibody SERO responses in COVID-19 patients

    Authors: Mohau S Makatsa; Marius B Tincho; Jerome M Wendoh; Sherazaan D Ismail; Rofhiwa Nesamari; Francisco Pera; Scott de Beer; Anura David; Sarika Jugwanth; Maemu P Gededzha; Nakampe Mampeule; Ian Sanne; Wendy Stevens; Lesley Scott; Jonathan Blackburn; Elizabeth S Mayne; Roanne S Keeton; Wendy A Burgers

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.20167940 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has swept the world and poses a significant global threat to lives and livelihoods, with over 16 million confirmed cases TRANS and at least 650 000 deaths MESHD from COVID-19 in the first 7 months of the pandemic. Developing tools to measure seroprevalence SERO and understand protective immunity to SARS-CoV-2 is a priority. We aimed to develop a serological assay SERO using plant-derived recombinant viral proteins, which represent important tools in less-resourced settings. Methods: We established an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay SERO ( ELISA SERO) using the S1 and receptor-binding domain (RBD) portions of the spike protein from SARS-CoV-2, expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. We measured antibody SERO responses in sera from South African patients (n=77) who had tested positive by PCR for SARS-CoV-2. Samples were taken a median of six weeks after the diagnosis, and the majority of participants had mild and moderate COVID-19 disease MESHD. In addition, we tested the reactivity of pre-pandemic plasma SERO (n=58) and compared the performance SERO of our in-house ELISA SERO with a commercial assay. We also determined whether our assay could detect SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG and IgA in saliva. Results: We demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2-specific immunoglobulins are readily detectable using recombinant plant-derived viral proteins, in patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by PCR. Reactivity to S1 and RBD was detected in 51 (66%) and 48 (62%) of participants, respectively. Notably, we detected 100% of samples identified as having S1-specific antibodies SERO by a validated, high sensitivity SERO commercial ELISA SERO, and OD values were strongly and significantly correlated between the two assays. For the pre-pandemic plasma SERO, 1/58 (1.7%) of samples were positive, indicating a high specificity for SARS-CoV-2 in our ELISA SERO. SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG correlated significantly with IgA and IgM responses. Endpoint titers of S1- and RBD-specific immunoglobulins ranged from 1:50 to 1:3200. S1-specific IgG and IgA were found in saliva samples from convalescent volunteers. Conclusions: We demonstrate that recombinant SARS-CoV-2 proteins produced in plants enable robust detection of SARS-CoV-2 humoral responses. This assay can be used for seroepidemiological studies and to measure the strength and durability of antibody SERO responses to SARS-CoV-2 in infected patients in our setting.

    SARS-CoV-2 Seroprevalence SERO in Relation to Timing of Symptoms

    Authors: Joseph Ebinger; Gregory J. Botwin; Christine M. Albert; Mona Alotaibi; Moshe Arditi; Anders H. Berg; Aleksandra Binek; Patrick Botting; Justyna Fert-Bober; Jane C. Figueiredo; Jonathan D. Grein; Wohaib Hasan; Mir Henglin; Shehnaz K. Hussain; Mohit Jain; Sandy Joung; Michael Karin; Elizabeth H. Kim; Dalin Li; Yunxian Liu; Eric Luong; Dermot P.B. McGovern; Akil Merchant; Noah Merin; Peggy B. Miles; Trevor-Trung Nguyen; Koen Raedschelders; Mohamad A. Rashid; Celine E. Riera; Richard V. Riggs; Sonia Sharma; Kimia Sobhani; Sarah Sternbach; Nancy Sun; Warren G. Tourtellotte; Jennifer E. Van Eyk; Jonathan G. Braun; Susan Cheng

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.02.20166876 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Of individuals with SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody SERO testing performed, those who contemporaneously experienced a cluster of Covid-19 relevant symptoms in the 1-2 months preceding the antibody SERO assay were more likely to test positive whereas those who experienced the symptom clustering in the prior 3-6 months were more likely to test negative. These findings suggest that antibodies SERO likely wane over a period of months, particularly in relation to the timing of symptoms.

    A valid protective immune response elicited in rhesus macaques by an inactivated vaccine is capable of defending against SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD

    Authors: Hongbo Chen; Zhongping Xie; Runxiang Long; Shengtao Fan; Heng Li; Zhanlong He; Kanwei Xu; Yun Liao; Lichun Wang; Ying Zhang; Xueqi Li; Xingq Dong; Tangwei Mou; Xiaofang Zhou; Yaoyun Yang; Lei Guo; Jianbo Yang; Huiwen Zheng; Xingli Xu; Jing Li; Yan Liang; Dandan Li; Zhimei Zhao; Chao Hong; Heng Zhao; Guorun Jiang; Yanchun Che; Fengmei Yang; Yunguang Hu; Xi Wang; Jing Pu; Kaili Ma; Chen Chen; Weiguo Duan; Dong Shen; Hongling Zhao; Ruiju Jiang; Xinqiang Deng; Yan Li; Hailian Zhu; Jian Zhou; Li Yu; Mingjue Xu; Huijuan Yang; Li Yi; Zhenxin Zhou; Jiafang Yang; Nan Duan; Huan Yang; Wangli Zhao; Wei Yang; Changgui Li; Longding Liu; Qihan Li

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.235747 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: bioRxiv

    With the relatively serious global epidemic outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, public concerns focus on not only clinical therapeutic measures and public quarantine for this disease MESHD but also the development of vaccines. The technical design of our SARS-CoV-2 inactivated vaccine provides a viral antigen that enables the exposure of more than one structural protein based upon the antibody SERO composition of COVID-19 patients convalescent serum SERO. This design led to valid immunity with increasing neutralizing antibody SERO titers and a CTL response detected post-immunization of this vaccine by two injections in rhesus macaques. Further, this elicited immunoprotection in macaques enables not only to restrain completely viral replication in tissues of immunized animals, compared to the adjuvant control and those immunized by an RBD peptide vaccine, but also to significantly alleviate inflammatory lesion in lung tissues in histo-pathologic detection, compared to the adjuvant control with developed interstitial pneumonia MESHD pneumonia HP. The data obtained from these macaques immunized with the inactivated vaccine or RBD peptide vaccine suggest that immunity with a clinically protective effect against SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD should include not only specific neutralizing antibodies SERO but also specific CTL responses against at least the S and N antigens.

    Evaluation of Serological SARS-CoV-2 Lateral Flow Assays for Rapid Point of Care Testing

    Authors: Steven E Conklin; Kathryn Martin; Yukari C Manabe; Haley A Schmidt; Morgan Keruly; Ethan Klock; Charles S Kirby; Owen R Baker; Reinaldo E Fernandez; Yolanda J Eby; Justin Hardick; Kathryn Shaw-Saliba; Richard E Rothman; Patrizio P Caturegli; Andrew R Redd; Aaron AR Tobian; Evan M Bloch; H Benjamin Larman; Thomas C Quinn; William Clarke; Oliver Laeyendecker

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166041 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background. Rapid point-of-care tests (POCTs) for SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO vary in performance SERO. A critical need exists to perform head-to-head comparison of these assays. Methods. Performance SERO of fifteen different lateral flow POCTs for the detection of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies SERO was performed on a well characterized set of 100 samples. Of these, 40 samples from known SARS-CoV-2-infected, convalescent individuals (average of 45 days post symptom onset TRANS) were used to assess sensitivity SERO. Sixty samples from the pre-pandemic era (negative control), that were known to have been infected with other respiratory viruses (rhinoviruses A, B, C and/or coronavirus 229E, HKU1, NL63 OC43) were used to assess specificity. The timing of seroconversion was assessed on five POCTs on a panel of 272 longitudinal samples from 47 patients of known time since symptom onset TRANS. Results. For the assays that were evaluated, the sensitivity SERO and specificity for any reactive band ranged from 55%-97% and 78%-100%, respectively. When assessing the performance SERO of the IgM and the IgG bands alone, sensitivity SERO and specificity ranged from 0%-88% and 80%-100% for IgM and 25%-95% and 90%-100% for IgG. Longitudinal testing revealed that median time post symptom onset TRANS to a positive result was 7 days (IQR 5.4, 9.8) for IgM and 8.2 days (IQR 6.3 to 11.3). Conclusion. The testing performance SERO varied widely among POCTs with most variation related to the sensitivity SERO of the assays. The IgM band was most likely to misclassify pre-pandemic samples. The appearance of IgM and IgG bands occurred almost simultaneously.

    Effectiveness of Convalescent Plasma SERO for Treatment of COVID-19 Patients

    Authors: Shanshan Chen; Chunya Lu; Ping Li; Lei Wang; Huaqi Wang; Qiankun Yang; Liyinghui Chen; Jianbin Li; Hongwei Ma; Qian Sang; Jing Li; Luyang Xu; Xiangjin Song; Fangfang Li; Yi Zhang; Yi Kang; Lihua Xing; Guojun Zhang

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.02.20166710 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background and objective: The outbreak of COVID-19 has become a global health concern. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness and safety of convalescent plasma SERO therapy in patients with severe and critically ill COVID-19. Methods: Sixteen COVID-19 patients received transfusion of anti-COVID-19 antibody SERO-positive convalescent plasma SERO. The main outcome was time for viral nucleic acid amplification (NAA) test turning negative. Clinical laboratory parameters were measured at the baseline (d0) before plasma SERO transfusion, and day 1 (d1), day 3 (d3) after transfusion as well. Results: Among the 16 patients, 10 of them had a consistently positive result of viral NAA test before convalescent plasma SERO transfusion. Eight patients (8/10) became negative from day 2 to day 8 after transfusion. Severe patients showed a shorter time for NAA test turning negative after transfusion (mean rank 2.17 vs 5.90, P = 0.036). Two critically ill patients transfused plasma SERO with lower antibody SERO level remained a positive result of NAA test. CRP level demonstrated a decline 1 day after convalescent plasma SERO treatment, compared with the baseline (P = 0.017). No adverse events were observed during convalescent plasma SERO transfusion. Conclusions: Viral NAA test of most patients with COVID-19 who received convalescent plasma SERO transfusion turned negative on the 2nd to 8th days after transfusion, and the negative time of severe patients was shorter than that of critically ill patients.

    Cold-adapted live attenuated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine completely protects human ACE2 transgenic mice from SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD

    Authors: Sang Heui Seo; Yunyueng Jang

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.04.235689 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: bioRxiv

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has infected more than 16,000,000 people and has caused the death MESHD of more than 650,000 individuals since December 2019. A safe and effective vaccine that can provide herd immunity against SARS-CoV-2 is urgently needed to stop the spread of this virus among humans. Many human viral vaccines are live attenuated forms of viruses that elicit humoral and cellular immunity. Here, we describe the development of a cold-adapted live attenuated vaccine (SARS-CoV-2/human/Korea/CNUHV03-CA22{degrees}C/2020) by gradually adapting the growth of SARS-CoV-2 from 37{degrees}C to 22{degrees}C in Vero cells. This vaccine can be potentially administered to humans through nasal spray. Its single dose was observed to strongly induce the neutralising antibody SERO (>640), cellular immunity, and mucosal IgA antibody SERO in intranasally immunised K18-hACE2 mice, which are very susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection MESHD. The one-dose vaccinated mice were completely protected from SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD and did not show loss of body weight MESHD, death MESHD, and the presence of virus in tissues, such as the nasal turbinates, brain, lungs, and kidneys. Taken together, the cold-adapted live attenuated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine developed by us may contribute to saving of human lives from the threat of SARS-CoV-2.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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