Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Infections (422)

Disease (298)

Death (175)

Coronavirus Infections (161)

Fever (72)


Human Phenotype

Fever (72)

Anxiety (63)

Cough (56)

Hypertension (52)

Pneumonia (38)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 21 - 30 records in total 871
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    The Impact of COVID-19 on Medical Practice: A Nationwide Survey of Dermatologists and Healthcare Providers

    Authors: Mohammed Shanshal; Hayder Saad Ahmed; Hayder Asfoor; Raad Ibrahim Salih; Shehab Ahmed Ali; Yusif k. Aldabouni

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.26.20156380 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed medical practice worldwide. It posed a significant impact on different health services, including dermatology. Methods and objectives: Two online surveys were conducted to determine the prevalence SERO of personal protective equipment-related skin complications (200 healthcare providers were included) and to demonstrate the outbreak s impact on dermatology practice (100 dermatologists were included). Results: In the first survey, the response rate was 72.46%. PPE- related dermatoses were reported by 147 (73%) participants, including frictional dermatitis MESHD (51.9%), mechanical acne HP (33.1%), contact dermatitis MESHD contact dermatitis HP (29.9%), nonspecific rash (17.5%), urticaria MESHD urticaria HP (9.1%) and skin infections MESHD (3.2%). The response rate of the second survey was 64%. COVID-19 emerging cutaneous manifestations were recognized by 20% of dermatologists, including maculopapular rash (41.67%), urticaria MESHD urticaria HP (37.50%), chilblain MESHD chilblain HP (25%) and vasculitis MESHD vasculitis HP (16.67). Telemedicine was provided by 73% of the dermatologists. The relapse rates of psoriasis MESHD, atopic dermatitis MESHD atopic dermatitis HP, rosacea MESHD, vitiligo MESHD vitiligo HP and alopecia areata MESHD alopecia areata HP were noticeably increased as observed by 62%, 50%, 20%, and 4% of dermatologists, respectively. Most dermatologists (89%) reported minimal use of immunosuppressive drugs amid the pandemic. Conclusions: This article highlights the pivotal role of dermatologists in the leading edge during the current health crisis and how they adapt to these unfamiliar circumstances to meet the challenges. It documents the emergence of PPE-related dermatoses among healthcare providers and the impact of COVID-19 on different aspects of dermatology practice.

    Prevalence SERO and Determinants of Mental Distress During COVID-19 Outbreak in Bangladesh: Evidence from an Online Survey

    Authors: Shilpi Rani Saha; Md. Mobarak Hossain Khan

    id:10.20944/preprints202008.0104.v1 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: Preprints.org

    Background: Coronavirus disease MESHD 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic and life-threatening highly infectious disease MESHD. The people of Bangladesh are at high risk of COVID-19 and have already experienced various socio-economic, health and psychological (mental) consequences. Particularly, mental health problems are dominantly reported in the literature and should be controlled. The main objective of this epidemiological study is to assess the mental distress and identify its determinants using online-based survey. Such information is urgently needed to develop feasible strategies for Bangladesh. Methods: An online survey was conducted for this study from May 01 to May 05, 2020. A total of 240 respondents provided self-reported online responses. Respondent’s mental distress was measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12) and by the self-rated mental health (SRMH) question. Various kinds of statistical analyses ranging from simple to multivariable logistic recession were performed using SPSS 23.0. Results: About 31.3% and 48.3% of respondents were mentally distressed by GHQ-12 and SRMH question, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mental distress was significantly higher among those respondents, whose usual activity was affected by the coronavirus (OR = 6.40, 95% CI: 1.87 - 21.90, p<0.001) and whose financial stress was increased due to lockdown (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01 – 4.46, p<0.05) on GHQ-12. Female TRANS sex (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.03 – 3.75, p<0.05) and respondents with poor mental health before the outbreak (OR = 3.38, 95% CI: 1.18 – 9.72, p<0.05) were also significantly affected by mental distress on SRMH. Conclusions: At least thirty percent of the respondents were found to be mentally distressed. Some of the study findings, particularly significant determinants, should be considered while developing strategies to reduce the burden of mental distress among study respondents or similar group in Bangladesh.

    Paradoxical Case Fatality Rate dichotomy of Covid-19 among rich and poor nations points to the hygiene hypothesis.

    Authors: Bithika Chatterjee; Rajeeva Laxman Karandikar; Shekhar C. Mande

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20165696 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    In the first six months of its deadly spread across the world, the Covid-19 incidence has exhibited interesting dichotomy between the rich and the poor countries. Surprisingly, the incidence and the Case Fatality Rate has been much higher in the richer countries compared with the poorer countries. However, the reasons behind this dichotomy have not been explained based on data or evidence, although some of the factors for the susceptibility of populations to SARS-CoV-2 infections MESHD have been proposed. We have taken into consideration all publicly available data and mined for the possible explanations in order to understand the reasons for this phenomenon. The data included many parameters including demography of nations, prevalence SERO of communicable and non- communicable diseases MESHD, sanitation parameters etc. Results of our analyses suggest that demography, improved sanitation and hygiene, and higher incidence of autoimmune disorders as the most plausible factors to explain higher death MESHD rates in the richer countries Thus, the much debated hygiene hypothesis appears to lend credence to the Case Fatality Rate dichotomy between the rich and the poor countries.

    Sooner than you think: a very early affective reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine in Argentina

    Authors: Fernando Torrente; Adrian Ezequiel Yoris; Daniel Low; Pablo Lopez; Pedro Bekinschtein; Marcelo Cetkovich; Facundo Manes

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.31.20166272 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    The unique circumstances created by the COVID-19 pandemic pose serious challenges to mood stability and emotional regulation at all ages TRANS. Although many people tend to react resiliently to stress, others appear to display emotional anxiety HP and depression-related symptoms. In this study, we carried out a survey (N = 10,053) during the first week of the general lockdown (quarantine) in Argentina to measure early affective reactions in Argentine adults TRANS. Respondents showed substantial anxious and depressive symptoms, with 33 % and 23% of participants reporting possible depressive andanxious syndromes MESHD, respectively, with the youngest group (18 to 25 y.o.) showing the highest prevalence SERO of symptoms. Even if prior mental health problems predisposed or aggravated the reaction, participants without prior complaints showed signs of psychological impact. Using linear regression, the most important independent variables related to depressive symptoms was the feeling of loneliness followed by daily stress. In the case of anxious states, the strongest variables were negative repetitive thinking and feeling of loneliness. Other psychological, economic, and social factors are discussed. This study is in line with previous literature that highlights the importance of the psychological impact of pandemics but additionally demonstrates that these reactions are present at a large scale immediately after the start of quarantine with very low infectious rates as an early anticipatory adaptive reaction leading to potentially negative outcomes from adjustment disorders to major disorders. In addition, the present results provide potentially relevant information about sudden environmental impacts on affective states and specific pathways for anxiety HP and depression to be expressed. We end by discussing implications for public policy based on considering the most vulnerable groups.

    Altitude as a protective factor from COVID-19

    Authors: Timothy M Thomson; Fresia Casas; Harold Andre Guerrero; Rómulo Figueroa-Mujica; Francisco C Villafuerte; Claudia Machicado

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.20167262 Date: 2020-08-04 Source: medRxiv

    The COVID-19 pandemic had a delayed onset in South America compared to Asia (outside of China), Europe or North America. In spite of the presumed time advantage for the implementation of preventive measures to help contain its spread, the pandemic in that region followed growth rates that paralleled, and currently exceed, those observed several weeks before in Europe. Indeed, in early August, 2020, many countries in South and Central America presented among the highest rates in the world of COVID-19 confirmed cases TRANS and deaths MESHD per million inhabitants. Here, we have taken an ecological approach to describe the current state of the pandemic in Peru and its dynamics. Our analysis supports a protective effect of altitude from COVID-19 incidence and mortality. Further, we provide circumstantial evidence that internal migration through a specific land route is a significant factor progressively overriding the protection from COVID-19 afforded by high altitude. Finally, we show that protection by altitude is independent of poverty indexes and is inversely correlated with the prevalence SERO in the population of risk factors associated with severe COVID-19, including hypertension MESHD hypertension HP and hypercholesterolemia MESHD hypercholesterolemia HP. We discuss long-term multisystemic adaptations to hypobaric hypoxia MESHD as possible mechanisms that may explain the observed protective effect of high altitude from death MESHD from COVID-19.

    SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences from late April in Stockholm, Sweden reveal a novel mutation in the spike protein

    Authors: Tatiany Aparecida Teixeira Soratto; Hamid Darban; Annelie Bjerkner; Maarten Coorens; Jan Albert; Tobias Allander; Bjorn Andersson

    doi:10.1101/2020.08.03.233866 Date: 2020-08-03 Source: bioRxiv

    Large research efforts are going into characterizing, mapping the spread, and studying the biology and clinical features of the severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, we report four complete SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences obtained from patients confirmed to have the disease MESHD in Stockholm, Sweden, in late April. A variant at position 23463 was found for the first time in one genome. It changes an arginine (R) residue to histidine (H) at position 364 in the S1 subunit of the spike protein. The genomes belonged to two different genetic groups, previously reported as two of the three main genetic groups found in Sweden. Three of them are from group B.1/G, corresponding to the Italian outbreak, reported by the Public Health Agency of Sweden to have declined in prevalence SERO by late April, and more investigation is needed in order to ensure that the spread of different types of SARS-CoV-2 is fully characterized. HighlightsO_LIFour near-complete genomes of SARS-CoV-2 were assembled from late April in Stockholm. C_LIO_LIA novel mutation in the spike protein were found. C_LIO_LIThe phylogeny of the strains were discussed. C_LI

    High SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Health Care Workers but relatively low numbers of deaths MESHD in urban Malawi

    Authors: Marah Grace Chibwana; Khuzwayo Chidiwa Jere; Jonathan Mandolo; Vincent Katunga-Phiri; Dumizulu Tembo; Ndaona Mitole; Samantha Musasa; Simon Sichone; Agness Lakudzala; Lusako Sibale; Prisca Matambo; Innocent Kadwala; Rachel Louise Byrne; Alice Mbewe; Marc Y.R. Henrion; Ben Morton; Chimota Phiri; Jane Mallewa; Henry C Mwandumba; Emily R Adams; Stephen B Gordon; Kondwani Charles Jambo

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164970 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background In low-income countries, like Malawi, important public health measures including social distancing or a lockdown, have been challenging to implement owing to socioeconomic constraints, leading to predictions that the COVID-19 pandemic would progress rapidly. However, due to limited capacity to test for severe acute respiratory syndrome MESHD coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection MESHD, there are no reliable estimates of the true burden of infection MESHD and death MESHD. We, therefore, conducted a SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey amongst health care workers (HCW) in Blantyre city to estimate the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in urban Malawi. Methods Five hundred otherwise asymptomatic TRANS HCWs were recruited from Blantyre City (Malawi) from 22nd May 2020 to 19th June 2020 and serum samples SERO were collected all participants. A commercial ELISA SERO was used to measure SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in serum SERO. We run local negative samples (2018 - 2019) to verify the specificity of the assay. To estimate the seroprevalence SERO of SARS CoV-2 antibodies SERO, we adjusted the proportion of positive results based on local specificity of the assay. Results Eighty-four participants tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO. The HCW with a positive SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO result came from different parts of the city. The adjusted seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO was 12.3% [CI 9.0-15.7]. Using age TRANS-stratified infection MESHD fatality estimates reported from elsewhere, we found that at the observed adjusted seroprevalence SERO, the number of predicted deaths MESHD was 8 times the number of reported deaths MESHD. Conclusion The high seroprevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO among HCW and the discrepancy in the predicted versus reported deaths MESHD, suggests that there was early exposure but slow progression of COVID-19 epidemic in urban Malawi. This highlights the urgent need for development of locally parameterised mathematical models to more accurately predict the trajectory of the epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa for better evidence-based policy decisions and public health response planning.

    Self-rated smell ability enables highly specific predictors of COVID-19 status: a case control study in Israel

    Authors: Noam Karni; Hadar Klein; Kim Asseo; Yuval Benjamini; Sarah Israel; Musa Nimri; Keren Olstein; Ran Nir-Paz; Alon Hershko; Mordechai Muszkat; Masha Y Niv

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164327 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background: Clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 poses an enormous challenge to early detection and prevention of COVID-19, which is of crucial importance for pandemic containment. Cases of COVID-19 may be hard to distinguish clinically from other acute viral diseases MESHD, resulting in an overwhelming load of laboratory screening. Sudden onset of taste and smell loss emerge as hallmark of COVID-19. The optimal ways for including these symptoms in the screening of suspected COVID-19 patients should now be established. Methods: We performed a case-control study on patients that were PCR-tested for COVID-19 (112 positive and 112 negative participants), recruited during the first wave (March 2020 - May 2020) of COVID-19 pandemic in Israel. Patients were interviewed by phone regarding their symptoms and medical history and were asked to rate their olfactory and gustatory ability before and during their illness on a 1-10 scale. Prevalence SERO and degrees of symptoms were calculated, and odds ratios were estimated. Symptoms-based logistic-regression classifiers were constructed and evaluated on a hold-out set. Results: Changes in smell and taste occurred in 68% (95% CI 60%-76%) and 72% (64%-80%), of positive patients, with 24 (11-53 range) and 12 (6-23) respective odds ratios. The ability to smell was decreased by 0.5 {+/-} 1.5 in negatives, and by 4.5 {+/-} 3.6 in positives, and to taste by 0.4 {+/-} 1.5 and 4.9 {+/-} 3.8, respectively (mean {+/-} SD). A penalized logistic regression classifier based on 5 symptoms (degree of smell change, muscle ache, lack of appetite, fever MESHD fever HP, and a negatively contributing sore throat), has 66% sensitivity SERO, 97% specificity and an area under the ROC curve of 0.83 (AUC) on a hold-out set. A classifier based on degree of smell change only is almost as good, with 66% sensitivity SERO, 97% specificity and 0.81 AUC. Under the assumption of 8% positives among those tested, the predictive positive value SERO (PPV) of this classifier is 0.68 and negative predictive value SERO (NPV) is 0.97. Conclusions: Self-reported quantitative olfactory changes, either alone or combined with other symptoms, provide a specific and powerful tool for clinical diagnosis of COVID-19. The applicability of this tool for prioritizing COVID-19 laboratory testing is facilitated by a simple calculator presented here.

    Persistence of anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO in non-hospitalized COVID-19 convalescent health care workers

    Authors: Margherita Bruni; Valentina Cecatiello; Angelica Diaz-Basabe; Georgia Lattanzi; Erika Mileti; Silvia Monzani; Laura Pirovano; Francesca Rizzelli; Clara Visintin; Giuseppina Bonizzi; Marco Giani; Marialuisa Lavitrano; Silvia Faravelli; Federico Forneris; Flavio Caprioli; Pier Giuseppe Pelicci; Gioacchino Natoli; Sebastiano Pasqualato; Marina Mapelli; Federica Facciotti

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.30.20164368 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Background. Coronavirus disease MESHD-19 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome MESHD CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel beta-coronavirus. Although antibody SERO response to SARS-CoV-2 can be detected early during the infection MESHD, several outstanding questions remain to be addressed regarding magnitude and persistence of antibody SERO titer against different viral proteins and their correlation with the strength of the immune response, as measured by serum SERO levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Methods. An ELISA assay SERO has been developed by expressing and purifying the recombinant SARS-CoV-2 Spike Receptor Binding Domain (RBD), Soluble Ectodomain (Spike), and full length nucleocapsid protein (N protein). Sera from healthcare workers affected by non-severe COVID-19 were longitudinally collected over four weeks, and compared to sera from patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Units (ICU) and SARS-CoV-2-negative subjects for the presence of IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies SERO as well as soluble pro-inflammatory mediators in the sera. Results. Specificity and sensitivity SERO of the ELISA assays SERO were high for anti-RBD IgG and IgA (92-97%) and slightly lower for IgM and the Spike and N proteins (70-85%). The ELISA SERO allowed quantification of IgM, IgG and IgA antibody SERO responses against all the viral antigens tested and showed a correlation between magnitude of the antibody SERO response and disease MESHD severity. Non-hospitalized subjects showed lower antibody SERO titers and blood SERO pro-inflammatory cytokine profiles as compared to patients in Intensive Care Units (ICU), irrespective of the antibodies tested SERO. Noteworthy, in non-severe COVID-19 infections MESHD, antibody SERO titers against RBD and Spike, but not against the N protein, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased within a month after viral clearance. Conclusions. Rapid decline in antibody SERO titers and in pro-inflammatory cytokines may be a common feature of non-severe SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, suggesting that antibody SERO-mediated protection against re- infection MESHD with SARS-CoV-2 is of short duration. These results suggest caution in use serological testing SERO to estimate the prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in the general population.

    Comparative experimental evidence on compliance with social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Authors: Michael Becher; Daniel Stegmueller; Sylvain Brouard; Eric Kerrouche

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164806 Date: 2020-08-01 Source: medRxiv

    Social distancing is a central public health measure in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, but individuals' compliance cannot be taken for granted. We use a survey experiment to examine the prevalence SERO of non-compliance with social distancing in nine countries and test pre-registered hypotheses about individual-level characteristics associated with less social distancing. Leveraging a list experiment to control for social desirability bias, we find large cross-national variation in adherence to social distancing guidelines. Compliance varies systematically with COVID-19 fatalities and the strictness of lockdown measures. We also find substantial heterogeneity in the role of individual-level predictors. While there is an ideological gap in social distancing in the US and New Zealand, this is not the case in European countries. Taken together, our results suggest caution when trying to model pandemic health policies on other countries' experiences. Behavioral interventions targeted towards specific demographics that work in one context might fail in another.

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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