Corpus overview


Overview

MeSH Disease

Infections (422)

Disease (298)

Death (175)

Coronavirus Infections (161)

Fever (72)


Human Phenotype

Fever (72)

Anxiety (63)

Cough (56)

Hypertension (52)

Pneumonia (38)


Transmission

Seroprevalence
    displaying 41 - 50 records in total 871
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    Determinants of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in Italian healthcare workers: a multicenter study

    Authors: Paolo Boffetta; Francesco Violante; Paolo Durando; Giuseppe De Palma; Enrico Pira; Luigi Vimercati; Alfonso Cristaudo; Giancarlo Icardi; Emma Sala; Maurizio Coggiola; Silvio Tafuri; Vittorio Gattini; Pietro Apostoli; Giovanna Spatari; - Working Group on SARS-CoV-2 infection in Italian healthcare workers

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20158717 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background. Healthcare workers (HCW) are at increased risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2, yet limited information is available on risk factors of infection MESHD. Methods. We pooled data on occupational surveillance of 10,654 HCW who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD in six Italian centers. Information was available on demographics, job title, department of employment, source of exposure, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and COVID-19-related symptoms. We fitted multivariable logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Findings. The prevalence SERO of infection MESHD varied across centers and ranged from 3.0% to 22.0%, being strongly correlated with that of the respective areas. Women were at lower risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD compared to men. Fever MESHD Fever HP, cough MESHD cough HP, dyspnea MESHD dyspnea HP and malaise were the symptoms most strongly associated with infection MESHD, together with anosmia HP and ageusia MESHD. No differences in the risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD were detected between job titles, or working in a COVID-19 designated department. Reported contact with a patient inside or outside the workplace was a risk factor. Use of a mask was strongly protective against risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD as was use of gloves. The use of a mask by the source of exposure (patient or colleague) had an independent effect in reducing infection MESHD infection risk TRANS infection risk TRANS risk.

    Nicotine-replacement therapy, as a surrogate of smoking, and the risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 and all-cause mortality: a nationwide, observational cohort study in France

    Authors: Mahmoud Zureik; Berangere Baricault; Celementine Vabre; Laura SEMENZATO; Jerome Drouin; Francois cuenot; Laetitia penso; Philippe Herlemont; Emilie Sbidian; Alain Weill; Mathieu Molimard; Rosemary Dray-Spira; Jeremie Botton

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.28.20160630 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Abstract Introduction Several studies have reported an unexpectedly low prevalence SERO of current smoking among hospitalized patients with Covid-19. However, these studies mostly compared observed to expected rates of smoking without direct comparison with individual controls. Objective To examine the association of nicotine-replacement therapy, as a surrogate of smoking, with hospitalization and all-cause mortality during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in France. Methods We conducted a nationwide matched exposed/unexposed cohort study using information from the French national health data system which covers the entire French population. We conducted two separate analyses, the first in individuals exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy without major smoking-related diseases MESHD (cancer, cardiovascular and/or respiratory diseases MESHD) and the second in those presenting these conditions. We included all individuals, aged TRANS between 18 and 75 years, who had been reimbursed at least one nicotine-replacement therapy between November 15, 2019, and February 15, 2020. For each exposed individual, we randomly selected, from the entire Metropolitan French population, up to two non-exposed individuals (1:2) matched for the following variables: age TRANS (same year of birth), sex, department of residence (n=96 in Metropolitan France), and complementary universal health insurance (CMU-C). The three end points were a hospitalization with Covid-19, a death MESHD or an intubation in hospitalized patients with Covid-19, and all-cause mortality. We compared outcomes in individuals who were exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy with those in individuals who were not, using a multivariable Cox model with inverse probability weighting according to the propensity score. Results In the first analysis, 297,070 individuals without major smoking-related diseases MESHD exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy were matched with 558,228 unexposed individuals without major smoking-related diseases MESHD. Individuals were aged TRANS on average 45.6 years (standard deviation: 12.7) and 48.8% were male TRANS. From February 15, 2020 to June 7, 2020, hospitalization with Covid-19 occurred in 647 patients (151 patients in the nicotine-replacement therapy group and 496 patients in the unexposed group). In the main multivariable analysis, nicotine-replacement therapy was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 compared with unexposed individuals (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.61). Nicotine-replacement therapy exposure was also associated with a decreased risk of intubation or death MESHD in hospitalized individuals with Covid-19 (13 vs. 73 patients, hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.57) but with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (251 vs. 231 deaths MESHD, hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.80). In the second analysis, 128,768 individuals with major smoking-related diseases MESHD exposed to nicotine-replacement therapy were matched with 243,793 unexposed individuals. Individuals were aged TRANS on average 55.3 years (standard deviation: 11.4) and 53.3% were male TRANS. In the main multivariable analysis, nicotine-replacement therapy exposure was neither associated with risk of hospitalization with Covid-19 (240 patients in the nicotine-replacement therapy group and 398 patients in the unexposed group, hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.38) nor with risk of death MESHD or an intubation in hospitalized individuals with Covid-19 (48 vs. 61 patients, hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.54). All-cause mortality was higher in the nicotine-replacement therapy group (1040 vs. 366 deaths MESHD, hazard ratio, 3.83; 95% CI, 3.41 to 4.31). Conclusions This large-scale observational study suggests that smoking, measured by exposure to nicotine-replacement therapy, was associated with an increased risk of overall mortality during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in France, although it was associated with a lower risk of severe Covid-19 in individuals without major related-smoking diseases MESHD. Experimental and clinical studies are needed to disentangle the potential mechanisms of nicotine and/or smoking in Covid-19 risk. Whatever the nature of these associations, the global impact of smoking is harmful for health even over a short epidemic period.

    Incidence and outcomes of healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections MESHD: significance of delayed diagnosis and correlation with staff absence

    Authors: Kirstin Khonyongwa; Surabhi K Taori; Ana Soares; Nergish Desai; Malur Sudhanva; William Bernal; Silke Schelenz; Lisa A Curran

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.24.20148262 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The sudden increase in COVID-19 admissions in hospitals during the SARS-CoV2 pandemic of 2020 has led to onward transmissions TRANS among vulnerable inpatients. Aims: This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence SERO and clinical outcomes of Healthcare-associated COVID-19 infections MESHD (HA-COVID-19) during the 2020 epidemic and study factors which may promote or correlate with its incidence and transmission TRANS in a London Teaching Hospital Trust. Methods: Electronic laboratory, patient and staff self-reported sickness records were interrogated for the period 1st March to 18th April 2020. HA-COVID-19 was defined as symptom onset TRANS >14d of admission. Test performance SERO of a single combined throat and nose swab (CTNS) for patient placement and the effect of delayed RNA positivity (DRP, defined as >48h delay) on patient outcomes was evaluated. The incidence of staff self-reported COVID-19 sickness absence, hospital bed occupancy, community incidence and DRP was compared HA-COVID-19. The incidence of other significant hospital-acquired bacterial infections MESHD (OHAI) was compared to previous years. Results: 58 HA-COVID-19 (7.1%) cases were identified. As compared to community-acquired cases, significant differences were observed in age TRANS (p=0.018), ethnicity (p<0.001) and comorbidity burden (p<0.001) but not in 30d mortality. CTNS negative predictive value SERO was 60.3%. DRP was associated with greater mortality (p=0.034) and 34.5% HA-COVID-19 cases could be traced TRANS to delayed diagnosis in CA-COVID-19. Incidence of HA-COVID-19 correlated positively with DRP (R=0.7108) and staff sickness absence (R=0.7815). OHAI rates were similar to previous 2 years. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and isolation of COVID-19 would help reduce transmission TRANS. A single CTNS has limited value in segregating patients into positive and negative pathways.

    Estimating missing deaths MESHD in Delhi's COVID-19 data

    Authors: Shoibal Chakravarty

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.29.20164392 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: medRxiv

    A sero- prevalence SERO survey in Delhi measured an infection MESHD rate of 23.48% and an implied infection MESHD fatality rate (IFR) of 0.06%. Modeling using age group TRANS based IFRs from France, Spain and Lombardia project an average IFR that is significantly higher than currently estimated. We show that at least 1500-2500 COVID-19 deaths MESHD in the 60+ age group TRANS are missing.

    Cumulated burden of Covid-19 in Spain from a Bayesian perspective

    Authors: David Moriña; Amanda Fernández-Fontelo; Alejandra Cabaña; Argimiro Arratia; Gustavo Ávalos; Pedro Puig

    id:2007.15727v1 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: arXiv

    The main goal of this work is to estimate the actual number of cases of Covid-19 in Spain in the period 01-31-2020 / 06-01-2020 by Autonomous Communities. Based on these estimates, this work allows us to accurately re-estimate the lethality of the disease MESHD in Spain, taking into account unreported cases. A hierarchical Bayesian model recently proposed in the literature has been adapted to model the actual number of Covid-19 cases in Spain. The results of this work show that the real load of Covid-19 in Spain in the period considered is well above the data registered by the public health system. Specifically, the model estimates show that, cumulatively until June 1st, 2020, there were 2,425,930 cases of Covid-19 in Spain with characteristics similar to those reported (95\% credibility interval: 2,148,261 - 2,813,864), from which were actually registered only 518,664. Considering the results obtained from the second wave of the Spanish seroprevalence SERO study, which estimates 2,350,324 cases of Covid-19 produced in Spain, in the period of time considered, it can be seen that the estimates provided by the model are quite good. This work clearly shows the key importance of having good quality data to optimize decision-making in the critical context of dealing with a pandemic.

    Asymptomatic TRANS COVID-19 infection MESHD in multiple trauma MESHD patients: should we obtain more CT-scans?

    Authors: Seyyed Saeed Khabiri; Farhad Naleini; Ronak Miladi; Mina Sadat Mosavat; Maryam Khoshbakht; Shokofeh Maleki; Maryam Ghadimi; Soroush Baghdadi

    doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-51098/v1 Date: 2020-07-30 Source: ResearchSquare

    Background: There are studies that show a chest CT scan is superior to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies in the diagnosis of COVID. This study was designed to assess the prevalence SERO of COVID-related lung involvement in patients admitted to a trauma center.Methods: In a retrospective study, data from a regional referral trauma center from February 21, 2020 to April 10, 2020, were reviewed. All patients admitted to the hospital for whom a chest CT scan was performed during the study period for any reason were included. Trained physicians screened all CT-scans for findings suggestive of COVID-19. Next, blinded radiologists selected CT-scans with findings highly suggestive of COVID involvement. The clinical course and outcome, and the results of PCR for SARS-CoV-2 were recorded assessed.Results: A total of 4200 chest CT scans were reviewed. After multiple rounds of exclusion, 24 patients with highly- suggestive findings were reviewed. Only three patients developed COVID symptoms during the course of admission. PCR results were positive in 22 patients (92.6%). Conclusions: We suggest having a lower threshold for ordering chest CT scans in trauma patients at a high risk of COVID infection MESHD, as well as those requiring extensive surgical interventions. Also, a thorough review of the available CT scans before invasive procedures, preferably with the help of an expert radiologist, is highly recommended, even when the results of the COVID laboratory tests are negative.

    Seroprevalence SERO of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies SERO in Kenyan blood SERO donors

    Authors: Sophie Uyoga; Ifedayo M.O. Adetifa; Henry K. Karanja; James Nyagwange; James Tuju; Perpetual Wanjiku; Rashid Aman; Mercy Mwangangi; Patrick Amoth; Kadondi Kasera; Wangari Ng'ang'a; Charles Rombo; Christine K. Yegon; Khamisi Kithi; Elizabeth Odhiambo; Thomas Rotich; Irene Orgut; Sammy Kihara; Mark Otiende; Christian Bottomley; Zonia N. Mupe; Eunice W. Kagucia; Katherine Gallagher; Anthony Etyang; Shirine Voller; John Gitonga; Daisy Mugo; Charles N. Agoti; Edward Otieno; Leonard Ndwiga; Teresa Lambe; Daniel Wright; Edwine Barasa; Benjamin Tsofa; Philip Bejon; Lynette I. Ochola-Oyier; Ambrose Agweyu; J. Anthony G. Scott; George M Warimwe

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.27.20162693 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background There are no data on SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence SERO in Africa though the COVID-19 epidemic curve and reported mortality differ from patterns seen elsewhere. We estimated the anti- SARS-CoV-2 antibody SERO prevalence SERO among blood SERO donors in Kenya. Methods We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG prevalence SERO by ELISA SERO on residual blood SERO donor samples obtained between April 30 and June 16, 2020. Assay sensitivity SERO and specificity were 83% (95% CI 59, 96%) and 99.0% (95% CI 98.1, 99.5%), respectively. National seroprevalence SERO was estimated using Bayesian multilevel regression and post-stratification to account for non-random sampling with respect to age TRANS, sex and region, adjusted for assay performance SERO. Results Complete data were available for 3098 of 3174 donors, aged TRANS 15-64 years. By comparison with the Kenyan population, the sample over-represented males TRANS (82% versus 49%), adults TRANS aged TRANS 25-34 years (40% versus 27%) and residents of coastal Counties (49% versus 9%). Crude overall seroprevalence SERO was 5.6% (174/3098). Population-weighted, test-adjusted national seroprevalence SERO was 5.2% (95% CI 3.7, 7.1%). Seroprevalence SERO was highest in the 3 largest urban Counties; Mombasa (9.3% [95% CI 6.4, 13.2%)], Nairobi (8.5% [95% CI 4.9, 13.5%]) and Kisumu (6.5% [95% CI 3.3, 11.2%]). Conclusions We estimate that 1 in 20 adults TRANS in Kenya had SARS-CoV-2 antibodies SERO during the study period. By the median date of our survey, only 2093 COVID-19 cases and 71 deaths MESHD had been reported through the national screening system. This contrasts, by several orders of magnitude, with the numbers of cases and deaths MESHD reported in parts of Europe and America when seroprevalence SERO was similar.

    Serial population based serosurvey of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 SERO in a low and high transmission TRANS area of Karachi, Pakistan

    Authors: Muhammad Imran Nisar; Nadia Ansari; Mashal Amin; Farah Khalid; Aneeta Hotwani; Najeeb Rehman; Arjumand Rizvi; Arslan Memon; Zahoor Ahmed; Ashfaque Ahmed; Junaid Iqbal; Ali Faisal Saleem; Uzma Bashir Aamir; Daniel B Larremore; Bailey Fosdick; Fyezah Jehan

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.28.20163451 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background Pakistan is among the first low- and middle-income countries affected by COVID-19 pandemic. Monitoring progress through serial sero-surveys SERO, particularly at household level, in densely populated urban communities can provide insights in areas where testing is non-uniform. Methods Two serial cross-sectional household surveys were performed in April (phase 1) and June (phase 2) 2020 each in a low- (District Malir) and high- transmission TRANS (District East) area of Karachi, Pakistan. Household were selected using simple random sampling (Malir) and systematic random sampling (East). Individual participation rate from consented households was 82.3% (1000/1215 eligible) in phase 1 and 76.5% (1004/1312 eligible) in phase 2. All household members or their legal guardians answered questions related to symptoms of Covid-19 and provided blood SERO for testing with commercial Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoassay SERO targeting combined IgG and IgM. Seroprevalence SERO estimates were computed for each area and time point independently. Given correlation among household seropositivity values, a Bayesian regression model accounting for household membership, age TRANS and gender TRANS was used to estimate seroprevalence SERO. These estimates by age TRANS and gender TRANS were then post-stratified to adjust for the demographic makeup of the respective district. The household conditional risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD was estimated for each district and its confidence interval were obtained using a non-parametric bootstrap of households. Findings Post-stratified seroprevalence SERO was estimated to be 0.2% (95% CI 0-0.7) in low-and 0.4% (95% CI 0 - 1.3) in high- transmission TRANS areas in phase 1 and 8.7% (95% CI 5.1-13.1) in low- and 15.1% (95% CI 9.4 -21.7) in high- transmission TRANS areas in phase 2, with no consistent patterns between prevalence SERO rates for males TRANS and females TRANS. Conditional risk of infection TRANS risk of infection TRANS infection MESHD estimates (possible only for phase 2) were 0.31 (95% CI 0.16-0.47) in low- and 0.41(95% CI 0.28-0.52) in high- transmission TRANS areas. Of the 166 participants who tested positive, only 9(5.4%) gave a history of any symptoms. Interpretation A large increase in seroprevalence SERO to SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD is seen, even in areas where transmission TRANS is reported to be low. Mostly the population is still seronegative. A large majority of seropositives do not report any symptoms. The probability that an individual in a household is infected, given that another household member is infected is high in both the areas. These results emphasise the need to enhance surveillance activities of COVID-19 especially in low- transmission TRANS sites and provide insights to risks of household transmission TRANS in tightly knit neighbourhoods in urban LMIC settings.

    Impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic among health care workers in a secondary teaching hospital in Spain.

    Authors: Javier Garralda Fernandez; Ignacio Molero Vilches; Alfredo Bermejo Rodriguez; Isabel Cano de Torres; Elda I Colino Romay; Isabel Garcia-Arata; Jeronimo Jaqueti Aroca; Rosa Lillo; Daniel Lopez Lacomba; Luis Mazon Cuadrado; Laura M Molina Esteban; Luis J Morales Garcia; Laura Moratilla Monzo; Elva Nieto-Borrajo; Maria Pacheco Delgado; Santiago Prieto Menchero; Cristina Sanchez Hernandez; Eva Sanchez Testillano; Jesus Garcia-Martinez

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.26.20162529 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background. The COVID-19 pandemic has posed a huge challenge to healthcare systems and their personnel worldwide. The study of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD among healthcare workers, through prevalence SERO studies, will let us know viral expansion, individuals at most risk and the most exposed areas. The aim of this study is to gauge the impact of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in our hospital workforce and identify groups and areas at increased risk. Methods and Findings. This is a cross-sectional and longitudinal study carried out on healthcare workers based on molecular and serological diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD. Of the 3013 HCW invited to participate, finally 2439 (80.9%) were recruited, including 674 (22.4%) who had previously consulted at the OHS for confirmed exposure and/or presenting symptoms suggestive of COVID-19. A total of 411 (16.9%) and 264 (10.8%) healthcare workers were SARS-CoV-2 IgG and rRT-PCR positive, respectively. The cumulative prevalence SERO considering all studies (IgG positive HCW and/or rRT-PCR positive detection) has been 485 (19.9%). SARS-CoV-2 IgG-positive patients in whom the virus was not detected were 221 (9.1%); up to 151 of them (68.3%) did not report any compatible symptoms nor consult at the OHS for this reason. Men became more infected than women (25% vs 18.5%, p=0.0009), including when data were also classified by age TRANS. COVID-19 cumulative prevalence SERO among the HCW assigned to medical departments was higher (25.2%) than others, as well as among medical staff (25.4%) compared with other professional categories (p<0.01). Conclusions. Global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HCW of our centre has been 19.9%. Doctors and medical services personnel have had the highest prevalence SERO of SARS-CoV-2 infection MESHD, but many of them have not presented compatible symptoms. This emphasizes the performance SERO of continuous surveillance methods of the most exposed health personnel and not only based on the appearance of symptoms.

    The Impact of COVID-19 on Mental Health outcomes among hospital fever MESHD fever HP clinic attendants across Nepal: A community-based cross-sectional study

    Authors: Hridaya Raj Devkota; Tula Ram Sijali; Ramji Bogati; Meraj Ahmad; Karuna Laxmi Shakya; Pratik Adhikary

    doi:10.1101/2020.07.28.20163295 Date: 2020-07-29 Source: medRxiv

    Background: The COVID 19 pandemic has been creating a panic and distressing situations among the entire population globally including Nepal. No study has been conducted assessing the psychological impact of this pandemic on the general public in Nepal. The objective of this study is to assess the mental health status during COVID 19 outbreak and explore the potential influencing factors among the population attending the hospital fever MESHD fever HP clinics with COVID 19 symptoms. Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted between May to June, 2020 with a sample of 645 participants aged TRANS 18 and above in 26 hospitals across Nepal. Telephone interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire along with a validated psychometric tool, the Depression, Anxiety HP and Stress (DASS21) scale. The metrics and scores of symptoms and their severity were created and analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association of potential covariates with outcome variables. Results: The prevalence SERO of anxiety HP, depression and stress were 14%, 7% and 5% respectively. Participants from Bagmati province reported higher level of anxiety HP (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.42 10.59), while stress (OR 4.78, 95% CI 1.09 21.29) and depressive symptoms (OR 3.37, 95% CI 1.10 10.35) observed higher among the participants in Province 1. Women were more at risk of anxiety HP (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.21 8.20) and depression (2.75, 95% CI 1.16 6.51) than men. Similarly, people with primary level education found more prone to all factors, stress (OR 20.35, 95% CI 2.06 201.19), anxiety HP (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.24 7.91), and depression (OR 4.41, 95% CI 1.29 15.07). More farmers than labors showed higher odds (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.01 5.01) for anxiety HP, while individuals surveyed who reported their health status as poor-had higher odds (OR 5.95, 95% CI 1.08 32.68) for depression. Also, people currently living in rented houses reported more stress (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.07 9.05) and those living far from family reported higher rates of depressive symptoms (OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.01 12.58). Conclusion: The study identified increased prevalence SERO of stress, anxiety HP and depressive symptoms during the initial stage of COVID 19 pandemic in Nepal. Considering the findings, there is urgent need to develop and implement appropriate community-based mental health programs targeting individuals who have had COVID 19 symptoms and who are prone to develop adverse mental health outcomes. Key words: COVID 19, Depression, Anxiety HP, Stress, Pandemic, Public Health, Nepal

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MeSH Disease
Human Phenotype
Transmission
Seroprevalence


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